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FAQ/Strategy Guide by DDJ

Version: 1.0.0 | Updated: 07/05/2009

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\                     /\_____________________________/\                       /
 \                   / /                             \ \                     /
| |-----------------| |       Table of Contents       | |-------------------| |
 /                   \ \_____________________________/ /                     \
/                     \/                             \/                       \

                    Section                   Search Code
                    -------                   -----------
                    The Particulars . . . . . . . . [TPA]
                     - Game Release Data. . . . . . [GRD]
                     - FAQ Version History. . . . . [VHI]
                     - Game History . . . . . . . . [HIS]

                    Playing the Game. . . . . . . . [PLA]
                     - Basic Rules. . . . . . . . . [RUL]
                     - Game Variations. . . . . . . [VAR]
                     - Playing on IRC . . . . . . . [IRC]
                     - Playing the Berkeley Release [BER]
                     - Playing Modern Versions. . . [MOD]
                     - Strategies . . . . . . . . . [STR]

                    The Three C's . . . . . . . . . [CCC]
                     - Copyright. . . . . . . . . . [COP]
                     - Credits. . . . . . . . . . . [CRE]
                     - Contact Information. . . . . [CON]



\                     /\_____________________________/\                   [TPA]
 \                   / /                             \ \                     /
| |-----------------| |        The Particulars        | |-------------------| |
 /                   \ \_____________________________/ /                     \
/                    |\/                             \/|                      \
\                    |/\ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ /\|                  [GRD]
 \                   / /                             \ \                     /
| |                 | |       Game Release Data       | |                   | |
 /                   \ \                             / /                     \
/                     \/                             \/                       \

                                Genre : Puzzle/Wordplay
                            Developer : Berkeley Systems
                            Publisher : Berkeley Systems
                               System : PC, Mac
                       Official Title : Acrophobia
                         Release Date : November 17, 1997
                          ESRB Rating : N/A

The Berkeley Systems release of Acrophobia represented a mass-market release of
what had become a popular IRC-based game. Its official release date was
November 17, 1997 after a short public beta period. It was initially available
on www.bezerk.com, a free online entertainment network, which also featured
the more-popular You Don't Know Jack game.


\                     /\ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ /\                   [VHI]
 \                   / /                             \ \                     /
| |                 | |      FAQ Version History      | |                   | |
 /                   \ \                             / /                     \
/                     \/                             \/                       \

This FAQ serves a dual purpose. First of all, as expected, it is a guide for
the Berkley Systems release of the game. However, given that the Berkeley
Systems release of the game is not widely available (if it is even available)
anywhere, it is also a guide to how to find more recent implementations of the
game for those -- like me -- that played the classic release and would enjoy
playing a similar game again.

Version 1.0.0 : This guide now exists. It didn't used to. All great guides
              : start this way.
              : File Size: 31KB, 29957 characters, 3493 words, 10 pages


\                     /\ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ /\                   [HIS]
 \                   / /                             \ \                     /
| |                 | |          Game History         | |                   | |
 /                   \ \                             / /                     \
/                     \/                             \/                       \

The Acrophobia game concept was initially conceived of by Anthony Shubert. Most
early versions of Acrophobia ran in a text-based format in IRC chat channels,
moderated by AcroBot. AcroBot would generate the acronyms that players would
utilize, collect the responses, present the responses for voting, collect the
votes, present the winner and award points.

The game release this FAQ is primarily geared to is the 1997 release of a game
by the same name and concept by Berkeley Systems. Available on www.bezerk.com,
this release of Acrophobia required the user to download a game installer, and
then faciliated the connection with other users for gameplay. Berkeley Systems'
version of the game presented a rich graphic interface that augmented gameplay
and helped users better assess game developments. This release was labeled a
"netshow", an early term for an online multiplayer game. It drew heavily from
the common notion of game shows, and presented many play elements in a very TV
show-like fashion.

Berkeley Systems' release of the game opened Acrophobia to a much wider
audience. It drew players from Berkeley Systems' already-popular You Don't Know
Jack  netshow, but more importantly it brought Acrophobia away from the largely
niche-oriented IRC channels and onto the common user's computer. The graphical
interface and easier set-up process made it possible for a much larger audience
to player the game, largely enhancing Acrophobia's popularity.

Shortly after its release, however, Berkeley Systems was acquired by Sierra
On-Line, and focus was largely shifted away from the beZerk network. While the
site and game were left online for a period of time, they eventually
disappeared.

The game continued to exist in its IRC format for years more until the game was
eventually resurrected in 2006 in a new set-up: Acrowars, a browser-based
implementation of the classic Acrophobia rules. Today, several new versions of
the standard Acrophobia framework exist online, largely driven by the advent
of the Web 2.0 era, towards which the game is particularly well-sculpted.

Likely the most popular modern version of the game is Acrobabble, a Flash
implementation that runs in-browser which resurrects many of the UI features
that Berkeley Systems' Acrophobia introduced, enhanced using modern technology
to present a more interactive and appealing gaming experience.

This FAQ will give a short guide to the game's general rules and possible
variations, information on how one would play under these three main
implementations (IRC, Berkeley Systems', Acrobabble), and general strategy on
how to succeed in the game.



\                     /\_____________________________/\                   [PLA]
 \                   / /                             \ \                     /
| |-----------------| |        Playing the Game       | |-------------------| |
 /                   \ \_____________________________/ /                     \
/                    |\/                             \/|                      \
\                    |/\ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ /\|                  [RUL]
 \                   / /                             \ \                     /
| |                 | |          Basic Rules          | |                   | |
 /                   \ \                             / /                     \
/                     \/                             \/                       \

For starters, Acrophobia is a game for three or more players. Most
implementations limit the number of players to 11 for reasons that will become
apparent, but fundamentally it could be played by an unlimited number of
players. The game is played in rounds, with scores added up from multiple
rounds to determine a winner.

A round proceeds as follows:
  1. The moderator, typically a bot, proposes an acronym of 3 or more letters.
     The letters are typically randomly generated.
  2. The players each submit an "acro" (that is, something for each letter in
     the acronym to stand for) they've created using those letters. By
     definition, each word of the player's submission must start with the
     successive letters of the acronym. There must be as many words as there
     are letters. For example, the acronym "SDEFN" could have the response
     "Strange Dogs Eating Fig Newtons".
  3. Once all Acros are submitted or time runs out, the Acros are shown
     anonymously. Players vote for which Acro they like the best. Players are
     not permitted to vote for their own acro.
  4. The writer of the acronym with the most votes wins the round and receives
     points. Then the next round begins.

There are many, many variations on these simple rules -- the ones above just
form the basics for a game implementation.

It's also useful to note that most implementations of Acrophobia come with an
incorporated chat function, and that because of the unique nature of the game,
it has generated its own shorthand. Most of the phrases are common ("TY" for
Thank You, "WTG" for Way to Go", "GG" for Good Game), but one that is pretty
unique is GMV: Got My Vote, usually preceded by an Acro or a username.


\                     /\ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ /\                   [VAR]
 \                   / /                             \ \                     /
| |                 | |        Game Variations        | |                   | |
 /                   \ \                             / /                     \
/                     \/                             \/                       \

There are numerous variations on the above rule set. In some implementations of
the game, different groups can choose different rules. Other set-ups always use
a particular set of rules.

Some of the rule variations rules are geared toward making the game more
interesting or challenging, while others are aimed at forcing players to play
by the spirit of the rules rather than abusing them. Some popular rule
variations include:

  - Categories: rather than allowing any acro, players are encouraged to try to
    make their Acro fit into a certain category for the round. This typically
    makes playing several rounds less monotonous. However, there is no way to
    truly enforce players' adherence to the category except that players are
    encouraged not to vote for an Acro that didn't fit the category at all.
    Oftentimes, this type of popular enforcement is effective.

  - Player Select: rather than randomly generating an acronym (and category, if
    the category rule is being used), the winner of one round is permitted to
    select the category, acronym or both for the following round.

  - First-Submit Bonus: to encourage players to submit an answer quickly, bonus
    points are awarded to the first person to submit their answer.

  - Quality First-Submit Bonus: to encourage players to submit an answer
    quickly but to discourage them from just entering gibberish to receive this
    bonus, bonus points are awarded to the first submission to actually receive
    a vote in the voting round. Presumably, nonsense Acros won't receive any
    votes.

  - Correct Vote Bonus: to discourage players from not voting for answers that
    might compete with their own, a bonus point is awarded to those that vote
    for the answer that ends up winning.

  - Forced Voting: to discourage players from sitting out the voting round to
    avoid giving a vote to a competitor, players are only eligible to receive
    points for winning the round if they themselves voted for someone else's.

  - Special Acronyms: oftentimes, letter combinations that would be mostly
    impossible are intentionally included for variety sake. These are
    combinations that feature lots of repetition or alliteration (such as
    "PPPPP" or "ABABAB") or intentionally difficult sets of letters (such as
    "QZQ" or "KKZKZ").

  - Punctuation: some variations of the game permit players to include
    punctuation in their responses, which encourages sentences or statements.
    Others forbid anything but letters and even force capitalization of each
    word, which encourages labels and group names.

  - Points Awarded for Votes: while the standard game simply awards a set
    number of points to the winner, some variations give the winner more points
    if their Acro receives more votes.

  - All-Player Points: while the standard game only awards points to the player
    whose Acro was most popular, some variations give everyone points based on
    the number of votes they received. The winner receives the most points
    simply by virtue of receiving the most votes.

  - Length-Based Bonuses: in cases where the above variation is implemented and
    all players receive points for their votes, it is often the case that the
    player with the most popular Acro will receive a bonus based on how long
    the acronym was.

  - Round Time Limits: while some games keep a round going until all players
    have submitted their acros, some implementations enforce a time limit.
    In some instances, this time limit is based on the length of the acronym,
    while in others it is the same for all rounds.

  - End-Condition: some games propose a time limit; other games propose a round
    limit (that is, X number of rounds will be played); and other games end
    when a particular player reaches a certain number of points.

  - Tiebreakers: in the event of a tie at the end of the game, alternate
    methods have been used to determine a winner. Some revolve around using
    some characteristic from the game (such as the player with the longest
    winning acronym, or the player with the most points from votes and not from
    bonuses), but others utilize a face-off, in which the tied players are
    given three or four acronyms to write Acros for, which are then voted on by
    the other players. The player with the most votes over these Acros wins.

Needless to say, countless other rules variations are possible. Unfortunately,
given that the game is typically computer-driven, creating new rules for a
particular implementation is usually not very easy.


\                     /\ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ /\                   [IRC]
 \                   / /                             \ \                     /
| |                 | |         Playing on IRC        | |                   | |
 /                   \ \                             / /                     \
/                     \/                             \/                       \

The first implementation of Acrophobia arrived on IRC in 1994. In the IRC
implementation, players can play a strictly textual version of the game by
residing in the same channel where an AcroBot is operating. While in the past
some channels and servers had an AcroBot running all the time, it is unknown
whether these are still around. If you know of an IRC channel that is still
consistently running an AcroBot, let me know and I'll list it here. The most
popular channel for Acrophobia has traditionally been #acro on DALnet, EFnet,
Undernet and Starnet, but I'm unaware of whether these groups are still around.

There is one open project regarding a modern implementation of the AcroBot
IRC, located at the following URL: http://www.acrobot.org/ . Please note that
I have not personally played the IRC version in years, and this section is
written largely from memory. If you see anything that has changed or is now
inaccurate, please let me know.

Once in a channel with a suitable number of people and an active AcroBot, you
can begin playing. The game proceeds as described under Basic Rules, but
clearly the Basic Rules do not provide enough information to really understand
how AcroBot operates. Below are the specific rules that are in play when
playing Acrophobia with the IRC AcroBot:

  - New players may join at any time, including mid-round. They will obviously
    be at a disadvantage, but they do not have to wait until a new round starts
    to start playing.

  - AcroBot will echo all commands it receives, including Acro submissions and
    votes.

  - Acronyms are between 3 and 7 letters long, and are always randomly
    generated.

  - The time given to submit your Acro is varies based on the length of the
    acronym. Acronyms with up to 5 characters are given a minute and a half;
    longer acronyms are given two full minutes. The round will continue until
    the time limit has run out, even if everyone is finished sooner. If you
    submit a second acro, it will replace your first one.

  - Punctuation is permitted in the acro, but not at the beginning of words.
    This seems normal, but note that this means that syntax like this example
    are invalid. Example: "The elephant -- nature's plunger" In this
    instance, the AcroBot would recognize the "--" as a word.

  - After the submission portion is over, the Acros will be displayed in a
    randomized order. Acros are numbered, and you may vote for your favorite
    Acro by number. Voting will end when all participants have voted or after
    30 seconds, whichever comes first.

  - After voting has concluded, AcroBot will display the winner.

  - Scoring for the winning answer is based on the number of votes it received:
    one point per vote. Every person receives points for the votes they
    receive, whether they have the most votes or not.

  - Two bonuses are awarded. The fastest response to receive any votes receives
    the Speed Bonus of two points. The player with the most votes will also
    receive the Winner's Bonus, a number of bonus points equal to the length of
    the acronym. For the Winner's Bonus, if there is a tie, the bonus points go
    to the player who entered their acronym first.

  - One penalty will be assessed: if the winning player does not vote for any
    other acro, they will not receive the Winner's Bonus.

  - After a round is over, the AcroBot creates a new acronym and a new round
    begins.

  - The game is over when one player ends a round with 30 points or more. At
    this time, the player with the most points is the winner.

Because the AcroBot runs in a strictly textual IRC client, it's important to
know how to communicate. Below are the instructions for how to perform certain
actions in-game. To perform the action, type the command on the right.

Action                                                                  Command
------                                                                  -------
View the current acronym during submission period.       /msg AcroBot show acro

Submit an Acro during submission period -- replace          /msg AcroBot (acro)
(acro) with the Acro you'd like to submit.

View the answers during voting period.                /msg AcroBot show answers

Submit a vote during the voting round -- replace (#)           /msg AcroBot (#)
with the number of the Acro you'd like to vote for.

View the leaderboard                                   /msg AcroBot show scores

Get help and view other commands.                             /msg AcroBot help


\                     /\ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ /\                   [BER]
 \                   / /                             \ \                     /
| |                 | | Playing the Berekeley Release | |                   | |
 /                   \ \                             / /                     \
/                     \/                             \/                       \

The Berkeley Systems' version of Acrophobia -- also the source of GameFAQs'
page on the Acrophobia game -- was initially released in 1997 as a downloadable
game. Once downloaded and installed, the player could connect with other users
in different game rooms in a graphically-enjoyable and heavily augmented
gameplay environment.

Unfortunately, the Berkeley Systems release of Acrophobia is no longer widely
available, if it's even around at all. However, for the sake of history, as
well as staying true to the actual implementation that is represented by this
GameFAQs page, this is a description for how to play the Berkeley Systems
release. Please note I'm writing this description heavily from memory, so if
you notice anything wrong (or remember it differently), let me know.

Upon installing and opening the game, you'll be prompted to enter a nickname.
This will be your identifier for the duration of your session. Information and
records will not be persisted from play to play, so in many ways it is simply
a graphically-augmented version of the IRC game.

After opening the game and choosing your player nickname, you'll be presented
with the option to choose what room to play in. All rooms play by identical
rules -- the only differences are where each room currently is in a game, and
how many people are playing in each room. You can join a room mid-game, but you
will obviously be at a disadvantage. Usually the best option is to either
choose a room that has recently started a new game, but if there is no such
room, choose the room that is closest to concluding its current game. You'll
get a couple rounds to warm up, and you'll be there when the next game starts.

Once you've chosen a room, the game will largely proceed as normal. Because the
game is graphically-augmented, it's important to pay attention to the layout
of the screen. Below is an ASCII diagram of the main gameplay screen and its
parts. Please note this diagram is only for the acro-submission round; other
screens are described below this one.

 _____________________________________________________________________________
|                                                                             |
| Acronym Length for this round                 Time Bar ----------------- ## |
|                                                                             |
|      ____________                                                           |
|     |            |                                                          |
|     | # of Acros |                                           Category Name  |
|     | submitted  |                                                          |
|     | so far     |                                                          |
|     |____________|                                                          |
|                                                                             |
|                      Type your answer and press Enter                       |
|               _______________________________________________               |
|              |                                               |              |
|              |   Current round's Acronym is displayed here   |              |
|              |_______________________________________________|              |
|                                                                             |
|                                                                             |
|           _______________________________________________________           |
|          |   Type your submission for this round into this box   |          |
|          |_______________________________________________________|          |
|                                                                             |
|                                                                             |
|   _______________ _______________________________________________________   |
|  |               |                                                       |  |
|  |  Leaderboard  |                       Chat Box                        |  |
|  |      Box      |                                                       |  |
|  |               |                                                       |  |
|  |               |                                                       |  |
|  |               |                                                       |  |
|  |               |                                                       |  |
|  |_______________|_______________________________________________________|  |
|_____________________________________________________________________________|


When a round begins, the acronym will be displayed in the middle box. You'll be
given the time allotment to enter your Acro into the submission box. As
submissions come in, the graphic in the top left will display the number of
Acros that have already been entered. 

The time bar in the top right will display the numerical amount of time
remaining, as well as a graphical depiction of it. You'll receive a little
alert when time is almost out and you have no acronym entered.

Once the Acro submission time has concluded, the game will present the
submitted Acros for voting. Answers are randomized and numbered. To vote, enter
the number of the Acro you wish to vote for. Your own will be marked in green,
so you can't vote for your own.

After the voting round has concluded, the computer will present the winner and
award points.

For the Berkeley Systems version of the game, note the following rule
variations:

  - Acronym lengths are presented in order. The early rounds have shorter
    acronyms, while the latter rounds have longer ones. The pattern is the same
    in every game.

  - Voice alerts accompany most parts of the game, allowing you to play with
    the game in the background and by auditorily alerted when your interaction
    is needed.

  - Acronyms are always purely randomly generated.

  - Regardless of acronym length, you have 60 seconds to submit your Acro.

  - A categories system is utilized. The category is always displayed in the
    top right corner of the screen. Categories are only enforced by the will of
    the voters; the game does not enforce them, but typically voters will not
    vote for acronyms that deviate from the category.

  - Punctuation is permitted in the acro, but not at the beginning of words.
    This seems normal, but note that this means that syntax like this example
    are invalid. Example: "The elephant -- nature's plunger" In this
    instance, the game would recognize the "--" as a word.

  - After the submission portion is over, the Acros will be displayed in a
    randomized order. Acros are numbered, and you may vote for your favorite
    Acro by number. Voting will end when all participants have voted or after
    45 seconds, whichever comes first.

  - After the votes have been submitted, the winner will be announced.

  - Scoring for the winning answer is based on the number of votes it received:
    one point per vote. Every person receives points for the votes they
    receive, whether they have the most votes or not.

  - Two bonuses are awarded. The fastest response to receive any votes receives
    the Speed Bonus of two points. The player with the most votes will also
    receive the Winner's Bonus, a number of bonus points equal to the length of
    the acronym. For the Winner's Bonus, if there is a tie, the bonus points go
    to the player who entered their acronym first.

  - After the round, the game generates a new acronym of equal or greater
    length than the previous one.

  - The game utilizes a face-off to break ties and determine a winner. In a
    face-off, the two leading players will each be given three short (3-5
    letters) acronyms in succession. They will have 30 seconds to write their
    Acro in each instance. The player with the most total votes over all the
    face-off Acros will win.

  - You'll notice as you play that full-screen ads will pop up frequently
    between rounds. These advertisements were the initial purpose of the beZerk
    network, and are one of the earliest examples of web-based advertising. Not
    really relevant to the game, but interesting nonetheless.


\                     /\ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ /\                   [IRC]
 \                   / /                             \ \                     /
| |                 | |     Playing Modern Versions   | |                   | |
 /                   \ \                             / /                     \
/                     \/                             \/                       \

Today, there are two prominent implementations of the classic Acrophobia game
structure: Acrowars and Acrobabble. It had been my intention to include a guide
for both of these implementations in this FAQ; however, I haven't been able to
get Acrowars to load in weeks. So, this section will focus on likely the most
popular modern version of the game, Acrobabble.

The Acrobabble implementation is currently up and running all the time, and is
available at www.acrobabble.com. In order to play on Acrobabble.com, you need
an account with another networking site, like Yahoo! Mail, GMail, Facebook or
several others. After logging in through these third-party sites, you'll create
an account nickname for your profile. From here on, you can log-in to this
new account using the same method you used to create it (Yahoo! Mail, GMail,
etc.).

After creating your account, click the Play button at the top to navigate to
the game. The game is implemented in Flash and runs in your browser, so no
downloadable installation is necessary.

Upon entering the application, you'll be presented with three boxes. The bottom
box is a lobby chat for conversing with other players, and the right box is a
list of other players currently residing in the lobby. But the more important
feature is in the top left. Here is a list of the different rooms available. To
play, click the Join button on the right side of the room's row.

This box of possible rooms contains several bits of information. In the Options
column, it lists the different options that are in play for that game. Unlike
the IRC and Berkeley Systems games which always operated under the same rules,
different rooms in Acrobabble have their own rule sets. The three possible
variations are:
  - Clean vs. Unrated: in the Clean game version, curse words and other graphic
    terminology are not permitted in Acros, and will be either prevented or
    automatically censored. Other players in these rooms will frown on
    bypassing the censors and typically will not vote for such answers.
  - 6-letters vs. 7-letters: this option describes the maximum length of the
    acronyms in that room. While all rooms will have acronyms as short as 3
    letters, only the 7-letter room will have 7-letter acronyms. Effectively,
    though, these rooms are interchangeable, as people typically join whichever
    is more full (or is not yet full).
  - Regular vs. Face-Off: in a Face-Off game, two players go head-to-head.
    These modes tend to be less popular as they require voters who do not also
    submit Acros. Game rooms not marked as Face-Off rooms are regular rooms,
    which operate under the regular conditions.

The Players column displays the number of players in that room, and mousing
over the player icon will bring up the current leaderboard for that room. The
status column shows how many points the current leader has and how many points
the leader must have for the game to end. In Acrobabble, the game is over when
a player reaches a certain number of points, so use this to gauge how close the
game is to ending.

Your next step is to choose a room. Typically, the most popular rooms are the
regular Clean rooms. Oftentimes, one is full, so choose the open one if that's
the case. Otherwise, choose the closest to ending so you can be there for the
next game.

After arriving in the game room, you'll be presented with the main screen.
Below is a diagram of the main points of the main screen when the game is
accepting Acro submissions.

 _____________________________________________________________________________
| ## |____________________________| Time Bar                        Room Name |
|                                                       Rating: Clean/Unrated |
| # of Entries Submitted                                     Face-Off: Yes/No |
|                                     Round #    Acro Generation: Random/Word |
| Current Category                           Volume |______^_____|  |___O___| |
|                                                                   Exit Game |
|                                                                             |
|     ___________________________________________________________________     |
|    |                                                                   |    |
|    |            Acronym for current round is displayed here            |    |
|    |                                                                   |    |
|    |___________________________________________________________________|    |
|                                                                             |
|   -----------------------------------------------------------------------   |
|                               (other time bar)                              |
|              _________________________________________________              |
|             |              Enter your Acro here.              |             |
|             |_________________________________________________|             |
|                                                                             |
|                                                                             |
|______________________________________________________ ______________________|
|                                                      |                      |
|                        Chat Box                      | Current Leaderboard  |
|                                                      |                      |
|                                                      |                      |
|                                                      |                      |
|                                                      |                      |
|                                                      |                      |
|                                                      |                      |
|                                                      |                      |
|                                                      |                      |
|______________________________________________________|______________________|


The game proceeds fairly standardly. Acros are entered into the 'Enter your
Acro here' box, and there are two time bars: one at the top left, and one right
above your entry box.

Several game options are displayed in the top right, while the current Category
is shown in the top left, as well as the entries submitted thusfar.

Once the Acro submission period is over, the game shifts into the voting mode.
In voting mode, you're presented with all the Acros and a button to the left.
Click the button next to the Acro you'd like to vote for.

After all votes are collected, the game displays the winner and awards bonus
points based on various criteria.

There are several specifics to the Acrobabble implementation of the rules in
addition to the variations from room to room outlined above. Note the following
variations:

  - New players may join at any time, including mid-round. They will obviously
    be at a disadvantage, but they do not have to wait until a new round starts
    to start playing.

  - Up to 12 players can play in a room at a time. Once a room is full, new
    players cannot join the room until some players leave.	

  - Acronym lengths are not presented in any specific order, and can be between
    3 and 7 characters long.

  - Voice alerts accompany most parts of the game, allowing you to play with
    the game in the background and by auditorily alerted when your interaction
    is needed.

  - Acronyms can be randomly generated, or can be generated intentionally to
    be similar to a word. This option is specified by the winner of the
    previous round. More information on this can be found at the base of this
    section.

  - The time you have to submit your Acro differs partly based on the length
    of the acronym; however, the winner of a round also has the option of
    increasing or decreasing the amount of time available for the next round.
    More information on this can be found at the base of this section.

  - A categories system is utilized. The category is always displayed in the
    top left corner of the screen. Categories are only enforced by the will of
    the voters; the game does not enforce them, but typically voters will not
    vote for acronyms that deviate from the category.

  - The category for a given round is chosen by the winner of the previous
    round. More information on this can be found at the end of this section.

  - Punctuation is permitted in the acro, but not at the beginning of words.
    This seems normal, but note that this means that syntax like this example
    are invalid. Example: "The elephant -- nature's plunger" In this
    instance, the game would recognize the "--" as a word.

  - After the submission portion is over, the Acros will be displayed in a
    randomized order. Acros are numbered, and you may vote for your favorite
    Acro by number. Voting will end when all participants have voted or after
    30 seconds, whichever comes first.

  - After the votes have been submitted, the winner will be announced.

  - Scoring for the winning answer is based on the number of votes it received:
    one point per vote. Every person receives points for the votes they
    receive, whether they have the most votes or not.

  - Two bonuses are awarded. The fastest response to receive any votes receives
    the Speed Bonus of two points. The player with the most votes will also
    receive the Winner's Bonus, a number of bonus points equal to the length of
    the acronym. For the Winner's Bonus, if there is a tie, the bonus points go
    to the player who entered their acronym first.

  - One penalty is assessed. Any players who did not vote will not receive any
    of their points or bonuses from the round. The exception is if only one
    person actually submitted an answer, in which case the person cannot vote
    but receives their points anyway.

  - After the round, the round winner is presented with several options to
    choose for the subsequent round. More details on this can be found at the
    base of this section.

  - The game is over when one player ends a round with the designated number of
    points or more. At this time, the player with the most points is the
    winner, unless the game mode is face-off. Under a face-off, the top two
    players will the enter a face-off round to determine the winner.

An interesting feature introduced by Acrobabble is a winner's benefit from
round to round. The winner of a given round gets to choose three things for the
next round:
  - The category for the round. These are presented as a huge list of
    categories in a scrolling box. The winner can also enter their own
    category, not from the included list.
  - The acronym generation mode. By default, acronyms are generated randomly,
    but if Word mode is selected, the acronym will actually be a word.
  - The time for the round. The winner can choose to add or subtract 10 seconds
    from the subsequent round, or keep it as is.

If the winner fails to click 'Submit' before time is up, however, the Category
will be General and the other options left at the default.

Because Acrobabble is an active, modern-era community, there are a few features
included in its framework that have not been present before. First of all,
unlike past implementations, data and records are persisted: your profile view
on the main site displays how many games you've played and won, and how many
votes you've received. The site also features a "Hall of Humor" that displays
some of the most popular Acros of all time on the site, as well as a
Leaderboard, which displays the rankings among all recent players for most
points gathered.


\                     /\ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ /\                   [STR]
 \                   / /                             \ \                     /
| |                 | |           Strategies          | |                   | |
 /                   \ \                             / /                     \
/                     \/                             \/                       \

Despite the game's availability in several different implementations, the
strategy involved in the game remains relatively similar across different
versions. The presence of different rules may alter the way the game is played,
but many general strategies persist. Certain rule sets also grant benefits to
new strategies as well.

Generally speaking, it's difficult to identify real strategies given the
simplicity of the game. However, after years of playing on-and-off, I've
started to note certain tactics that meet with more success than others. This
section is largely my own brainstorming, and if you have other strategies you
have found useful in the past, please feel free to submit them for inclusion in
this section.

First of all, the best suggestion that can be given is to pay attention to the
winners from other rounds. Different groups have tendencies to favor different
types of Acros, and it's important to try to submit Acros that appeal to the
group you're playing with. In certain groups, extremely random answers are
appreciated, but in others -- especially among those that have been playing for
a while -- randomness is generally not voted for. To account for this, pay
attention to the types of answers that usually get the most votes, and try to
emulate those.

The strategy involved can differ pretty strongly based on whether you're in a
big room or a small one. In a small room, you've got a smaller chance of
running into really strong competition, so it's beneficial to just make sure
you answer early and stay on-topic. If you're in a larger room, though, usually
only quite good answers will win, so take your time in trying to think of a
good one.

It's also a great idea, if initially pretty non-intuitive, to attempt to vary
the structure of your Acros a good bit. Early players will find that the
natural inclination is to focus on Acros that are complete thoughts and usually
are labels for a group. These are the terms that our brains tend to think in
initially, but they usually aren't the best answers.

For longer acronyms, it's beneficial to go with full sentences, when the
category allows. Try to form a complete thought if the acronym is 6 or 7
characters, though don't be afraid to skip words where the meaning will be
obvious anyway. If the acronym is shorter, try going for a short exclamation
rather than the title for a group. In grammatical terms, I'd term this avoiding
passive voice -- Acros like "Frogs Dancing Vigorously" just don't have a very
smooth ring to it, compared with "Frog! Dance Vigorously!"

The "You Understood" used in that example is a good note to make as well. The
understood "You" at the beginning of sentences is a grammatical tool that lets
you phrase commands without specifying that you're saying them directly to the
listener. In Acrophobia, though, this is a great tool for allowing you to start
with a verb rather than a noun.

Generally speaking, most of the Acros you'll come up with are the types of
things that are so unique that no one else would've ever come up with them
under the same circumstances. However, one of the best ways to gain lots of
votes is to go directly against this trend: come up with an Acro that others
could've thought of. If they recognize it for its cleverness and not simply its
randomness or humor, they'll be more likely to gain votes.

Two good ways to accomplish this are to give statements that people can relate
to, or to go with phrases that are common anyway. For example, the acronym
"JJOTC" would lend itself mostly to nonsense considered the side-by-side J's --
but if you're clever enough to realize that it's also the acronym for the
common phrase "Jack jumped over the candlestick", you're likely to win easily.
This can be pretty hard to do, but gets easier if you actively try to find
phrases rather than invent your own.

Remember that in most implementations of Acrophobia, punctuation is permitted.
Punctuation is a great way to add emphasis and better convey your meaning, as
well as to add some inflection to your answers. Splitting an answer up and
including exclamations or other suggestions of voice intonations both are
extremely effective methods to improve long long acronyms.

Lastly, people love Acros that make them laugh. Certain topics typically get a
lot more attention then others. Some of these are predictable, like sex and
toilet humor. But more so, people love Acros that appear to be personal --
short phrases that appear to be a real anecdote or description of the writer's
actual life. Talk about your husbands, wives, boyfriends, girlfriends, dogs and
cats. And if you see an X, remember that "X-rated" is always a humorous term to
use in any context.

All these strategies center around high-level thinking, but oftentimes the most
difficult part of the game is thinking of words for individual letters. Often,
you'll get an idea in your head but won't be able to find how to fit one
particular letter into it, leading to a contrived end to your answer.

There are several ways to at least partially alleviate this. First of all,
rather than looking at each letter individually, take a look at a pair of
letters to start. Try to find something for the two to stand for as a pair
rather than taking them individually. From there, if the surrounding letters
flow quickly, you should be set -- if you have difficulty with other letters,
take them in pairs again.

Another great strategy is to work from the middle rather than from the
beginning. It's a natural inclination to work from the beginning of the
acronym, but realistically you can often push a word onto the front of an
acronym much more easily than inserting one in the middle. Words like "Really",
"Often" and "Sometimes", as well as general exclamations like "Yippee!",
"Zoinks!" and "Wowie!" can be added to the beginning or end of most without
trouble. So with the beginning or end taken care of, work from the middle
first. That will also give you multiple starting points to try to use.

Other than that, another letter-level strategy that should be mentioned is to
start with the most difficult letter. You might have a great Acro going and
then notice "Hey, there's a J over there. Crap." when you're faced with a
letter like J, K, Q, X, Y or Z, start with that letter and work from there.


\                     /\_____________________________/\                   [CCC]
 \                   / /                             \ \                     /
| |-----------------| |         The Three C's         | |-------------------| |
 /                   \ \_____________________________/ /                     \
/                    |\/                             \/|                      \
\                    |/\ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ /\|                  [COP]
 \                   / /                             \ \                     /
| |                 | |           Copyright           | |                   | |
 /                   \ \                             / /                     \
/                     \/                             \/                       \

Acrophobia is a registered trademark of Vivendi Universal. All rights reserved.

This FAQ is the exclusive property of DetroitDJ. All rights
reserved. This FAQ may be freely distributed on any site, in whole or part, as
long as this last section remains intact (all three C's).

The latest version of this FAQ will ALWAYS be located at:
              www.gamefaqs.com/computer/online/file/918364/56984

Other sites are permitted to show this FAQ; however, most do not automatically
update, and I only update my FAQs on GameFAQs -- so, if you don't see
something, check that URL to see if there's a newer version.


\                     /\ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ /\                   [CRE]
 \                   / /                             \ \                     /
| |                 | |             Credit            | |                   | |
 /                   \ \                             / /                     \
/                     \/                             \/                       \

Andrew Shubert, for the initial game concept, and Kenrick Mock and Michelle
Hoyle, for the game's first implementation.

Berkeley Systems, for the implementation that propeled Acrophobia to national
prominence.

Acrobabble, for presenting an incredibly well-done modern implementation of the
game.

CJayC, SBAllen and GameFAQs, for this great site.

God, for everything.


\                     /\ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ /\                   [CON]
 \                   / /                             \ \                     /
| |                 | |      Contact Information      | |                   | |
 /                   \ \                             / /                     \
/                     \/                             \/                       \

GameFAQs ID: DetroitDJ
E-Mail: DDJGameFAQs@gmail.com (please preface all e-mail subjects with [ACR])
AIM/Yahoo!/MSN/GoogleTalk: DDJGameFAQs

To e-mail me, PLEASE preface your e-mail subject line with [ACR] in brackets.
I get a lot of spam, so that will help me sort through it and find your e-mail.
If possible, IM me instead of e-mailing me if you have a question, but e-mail
me if you have a contribution or correction.

If you are submitting a tip or correction, please include how you would like to
be credited. Otherwise I'll credit you by your e-mail address (minus the
domain) or screenname.

Please, only e-mail me with questions about this game or other games I've
FAQed. I'm not looking to shoot the breeze.

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