Game Trivia

In an interview with Teiyu Goto, designer of the original PlayStation Controller, he explained what the symbols mean: The circle and cross represent "yes" and "no," respectively; the triangle symbolizes a point of view and the square is equated to a sheet of paper there to be used to access menus.

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Submitted by: GillFigno.  Rate it:

The PlayStation was originally designed to be a CD-ROM add-on to Nintendo's SNES, but was later designed to become its own, separate console.

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Submitted by: KeyBlade999.  Rate it:

The Start button is shaped in a triangle pointing to the right. The Start button on the Sony PlayStation's trademark game controller pays homage to the 'Play' button on audio and video media devices. Being an electronic company which also designs and produces audio and video media devices, Sony thought it would made sense to use the symbol to represent the Start button. This feature hasn't changed since.

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Submitted by: 91210user.  Rate it:

Prior to the release of the PlayStation, Nintendo and Sony were working together to create a new gaming console. Their relationship eventually fell out, leaving each to create their own consoles. The specs for the hypothetical Nintendo-Sony console, however, were used for Sony's highly-successful PlayStation, creating further tension between Nintendo and Sony.

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Submitted by: KeyBlade999.  Rate it:

The game discs base were coated black to help easily find the difference between genuine prints of games between pirated copies of games, which helped contribute the effort of fighting piracy.

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Submitted by: 91210user.  Rate it:

The PlayStation sold over 102 million units worldwide during its lifetime and was the first video game console to sell over 100 million, achieving this 9 years and 6 months after its initial launch.

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Submitted by: noidentity.  Rate it:

The best-selling PlayStation game is Gran Turismo with over 10.85 million copies sold worldwide.

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Submitted by: noidentity.  Rate it:

The PlayStation was announced to the United States at the very first Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3) at Los Angeles in 1995. Shortly after the Sega Saturn's presentation which included its announced launch price of $399, Sony Computer Entertainment America's president Steve Race took to the stage and simply said into the microphone "$299" and walked away to a huge applause. Sega of America's president Tom Kalinske was reportedly in the audience when this occurred and uttered "Oh, shit."

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Submitted by: noidentity.  Rate it:

Development of the PlayStation began as far back as 1986 with a joint venture between Nintendo and Sony. Nintendo wanted to continue storage capabilities for the Super Famicom, and they approached Sony to develop a CD-ROM add-on, originally called the "Play Station" or "SNES-CD". Nintendo's decision to work with Sony was due to Ken Kutaragi, the person who would later be dubbed "The Father of the PlayStation", who had sold Nintendo on using the Sony SPC-700 processor for use as the eight-channel ADPCM sound set in the Super Famicom/SNES console. Nintendo was immediately impressed with the processor's capabilities.

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Submitted by: noidentity.  Rate it:

At one point during development, Ken Kutaragi was almost fired by Sony on the grounds that he was working with Nintendo on the side without Sony's knowledge while still employed by Sony. Norio Ohga, who was Sony's CEO at the time recognized the potential in Kutaragi's SPC-700 chip, and in working with Nintendo on the project. Ohga allowed Kutaragi to remain employed at Sony, and it was not until Nintendo cancelled the project that Sony decided to develop its own console.

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Submitted by: noidentity.  Rate it:

The SNES CD add-on, originally dubbed as the "Play Station" was to be announced at the 1991 Consumer Electronics Show (CES), but once Hiroshi Yamauchi read the original 1988 contract between Sony and Nintendo, he realized that the earlier agreement essentially handed Sony complete control over any and all titles written on the SNES CD-ROM format. Yamauchi decided that the contract was totally unacceptable and he secretly cancelled all plans for the SNES CD attachment without Sony's knowledge. Instead of announcing a partnership between Sony and Nintendo, at 9 am the day of the Consumer Electronics Show, Nintendo chairman Howard Lincoln stepped onto the stage and revealed that Nintendo was now allied with Philips, and Nintendo was planning on abandoning all the previous work Nintendo and Sony had accomplished. Lincoln and Minoru Arakawa had even flown to Philips' global headquarters in the Netherlands and reached a business agreement; one that would give Nintendo total control over its licenses on Philips hardware.

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Submitted by: noidentity.  Rate it:

Sony briefly considered negotiating with Sega to produce a stand-alone console. Tom Kalinske, Sega of America's CEO liked the idea and proposed this to Sega's Board of Directors in Tokyo, who promptly refused. In a 2013 interview, Kalinske recalled them saying "that's a stupid idea, Sony doesn't know how to make hardware. They don't know how to make software either. Why would we want to do this?"

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Submitted by: noidentity.  Rate it:

When Sony began development of the PlayStation on their own merits, Nintendo filed a lawsuit claiming breach of contract and attempted in US federal court to obtain an injunction against the release of what was originally named the "Play Station", on the grounds that Nintendo owned the name. The federal judge presiding over the case denied the injunction and in October 1991, the first incarnation of the PlayStation was revealed. Reportedly, only 200 of these early prototype units were produced.

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Submitted by: noidentity.  Rate it:

At the end of 1992, Sony and Nintendo reached a deal where the "Play Station" as it was still named, would have a port for SNES games, but Nintendo would own the rights and receive the bulk of the profits from the games, and the SNES would continue to use the Sony-designed audio chip. Sony later decided in early 1993 to begin reworking the "Play Station" concept to target a new generation of hardware and software. As part of this process the SNES cartridge port was dropped and the space between the names "Play Station" was removed becoming "PlayStation", ultimately ending Nintendo's involvement.

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Submitted by: noidentity.  Rate it:

After Sony's partnership with Nintendo fell through, all work on the console from the time of the partnership with Nintendo was scrapped, and the PlayStation design was restarted from scratch. Sony Computer Entertainment America originally planned to market the new console under the abbreviation "PSX" as the name "PlayStation" was negatively received in focus group studies. Early advertising prior to the console's launch in North America used the PSX abbreviation, but the term was dropped before the console's launch.

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Submitted by: noidentity.  Rate it:

During the PlayStation's development, according to SCE's producer Ryoji Akagawa and chairman Shigeo Maruyama, there was uncertainty over whether the console shoud focus on 2D sprite graphics or 3D polygon graphics. The decision to focus on 3D polygon graphics became clear after witnessing the success of Sega's Virtua Fighter in Japanese arcades.

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Submitted by: noidentity.  Rate it:

The PlayStation's launch was immediately successful, selling 2 million units within the first six months in Japan, and 800,000 units in the United States four months after its American launch. Although the PlayStation ha no pack-in software, games were often purchased with the system at a 4:1 attach rate.

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In 1998, Connectix created an PS1 emulator (Virtual Game Station) for Mac software, capable of playing many of the system's games. This was done by reverse engineering the PS1's BIOS file. By 1999, Sony had won an injunction against the company, preventing the commercial sale of the VGS and further use of the BIOS code. However, the US Ninth Circuit courts unanimously overruled the decision, saying that the reverse engineering fell under fair use laws. With Connectix able to sell its product as a direct competitor to Playstation, Sony later settled out of court, buying the emulator's rights and burying it once and for all.

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Submitted by: Shotgunnova.  Rate it:

In early 1995, PlayStation had proven to be a huge success in Japan. However, things seemed a bit less promising on the North American front. Sega was busily hyping its upcoming Sega Saturn, while Nintendo was silently creating some buzz for its upcoming Nintendo 64 (then known as the Ultra 64). How could Sony, then a newcomer to the video game industry, possibly compete? By taking note of and learning from the mistakes their competitors were making. Sega ultimately botched the Saturn's chances of success with a hastily-executed stealth launch, some questionable design choices and a $399 price tag.note Meanwhile, Nintendo's "kid-friendly" image, and their insistence on sticking with a cartridge format for the N64, led many gamers and third party developers, including Squaresoft, to abandon the company in favor of Sony. The PlayStation, despite little pre-release hype, eventually went on to become the most successful video game console of all time until its successor, the PlayStation 2, succeeded that throne in 2006.

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Submitted by: ZeoKnight.  Rate it:

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