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FAQ by RoninDarky

Version: 1.1 | Updated: 06/11/04

Risk II General FAQ Version 1.1

Written by: Randy Peth aka GreyRonin (RoninDarky on GameFAQs)
E-mail: grey_ronin86@hotmail.com

1.) Table of Contents
2.) Updates
3.) Game Modes
 3a.) Classic
 3b.) Same-Time
  a. Phases
  b. Dice System
 3c.) Tournament
  a. Point System
  b. In-Depth Tournament Info
4.) Game Types
 4a.) World Domination
 4b.) Mission
 4c.) Capital
5.) I-COM (Alliances)
6.) General Biographies
 6a.) Campbell
 6b.) Mackenzie
 6c.) Wellington
 6d.) Bonaparte
 6e.) Marmont
 6f.) Barbacena
 6g.) D'Erlon
 6h.) Maransin
 6i.) Solignac
 6j.) Sherbrooke
 6k.) Aubert
 6l.) Spencer
 6m.) Taupin
 6n.) Friere
 6o.) Vauban
 6p.) Baird
7.) Special Thanks
8.) Legal Crap

2.) Updates

Version 1.01: Added NeoSeeker to the site list, and added an Updates section.
Expect more information on the Tournament and some on the Territory Allocation
process soon.

Version 1.1 : Re-did the layout of the FAQ. Also provided alot more information
on the Tournament Mode. The only thing I won't add is strategies to beat the 
Generals. There are two reasons for this: 1. The same one probably won't work
twice; and 2. If you're even interested in playing this game, you should be 
able to concoct a simple enough plan to do it.

3.) Game Modes
	In Risk II, there are 3 different modes available to you: Classic, 
Same-Time, and Tournament Mode. 

 3a.) Classic
	There's nothing much to tell about this mode. It follows the basic 
rules of the board game except for one thing; when you go to make a Tactical
Move, you can only move to an adjacent territory, not all the way across your
empire.

 3b.) Same-Time
	A new addition to the Risk "universe" is Same-Time Risk. This means
that all attacks will be made simultaneously. To pull this off, new systems
for dice and the implementation of a Phase system were necessary.

  a. Phases
	There are a total of four Phases to Same-Time Risk: I-COM, 
Reinforcement, Battle, and Tactical Move.  The I-COM Phase consists of 
treaty-making between you and the other players. In the Reinforcement 
Phase, you will place your fresh armies on the territories you choose. 
However, there is now a limit to how many reinforcements may be placed 
in a territory each turn.  The equation for how many armies you can 
place is this: # of territories connected + 1 = Reinforcements allowed.  
So say you had control of Australia and wanted to place armies in New 
Guinea. Since it is connected to 3 of your territories, you can place 4 
armies in New Guinea.

	The next Phase, Battle, is the most complicated.  You will choose 
a territory to attack from and which to attack, but you will dedicate a 
certain number of your armies to that attack. Once the attack is 
confirmed, these armies leave their home territory to attack, which 
leaves the remaining armies home to defend. If the neighbor you attack 
decides to attack you, a "Border Clash" occurs. In a Border Clash, the 
attacking armies will battle each other and the winning army will 
continue on to attack the territory.  Another special type of attack is 
called the Mass Invasion. This occurs when 2 or more territories (they 
don't have to be from the same player) attack a territory.  The 
attacking territorys will all battle the defender at once until a victor 
is decided. If different players were involved in the Mass Invasion and 
the defender is defeated, a "Spoils of War" battle will be fought.  A 
Spoils of War is fought the same as a regular battle, with the victor 
taking the spoils (territory). The last special type of attack is called 
the Surge Attack. You will only be allowed one of these per turn. A 
Surge Attack is when a player attacks one territory, then plans an 
attack from that territory to another.  These battles are handled at the 
end of the phase.  The final Phase is the Tactical Move Phase.  You will 
be allowed one Tactical Mover per turn. A Tactical Move is the movement 
of excess armies in one territory to an adjacent territory.

  b. Dice System
	Unlike Classic Risk, Same-Time will use a single colored d-12 for 
battle. The color of the dice is dependent upon the number of armies in 
the territory and who is attacking and will affect the numbers rolled. 
The five colors in ascending order are: White, Yellow, Orange, Red, 
and Black. Here are the stats on each color.

White
Avg. Roll : 2.6
Range : Attacking = 1-3
	  Defending = 1-6
Number Split:
 1's = 4
 2's = 3
 3's = 2
 4's = 1
 5's = 1
 6's = 1

Yellow
Avg. Roll : 2.9
Range : Attacking = 4-7
	  Defending = 7-12
Number Split:
 1's = 2
 2's = 4
 3's = 2
 4's = 2
 5's = 1
 6's = 1

Orange
Avg. Roll : 3.5
Range : Attacking = 8-12
	  Defending = 13-20
Number Split:
 1's = 1
 2's = 2
 3's = 3
 4's = 3
 5's = 2
 6's = 1

Red
Avg. Roll : 4.1
Range : Attacking = 13-18
	  Defending = 21+
Number Split:
 1's = 1
 2's = 1
 3's = 2
 4's = 2
 5's = 4
 6's = 2

Black
Avg. Roll : 4.5
Range : Attacking = 19+
	  Defending = Not Available
Number Split:
 1's = 1
 2's = 1
 3's = 1
 4's = 2
 5's = 3
 6's = 4

 3c.) Tournament
	This last mode is only available in single-player.  Tournament 
consists of 16 games of Classic & Same-Time risk. The two ways that you 
can continue to the next game is to either complete the mission you are 
given or to destroy at least one general and still be around at the end 
of the game.  If you fail to finish an opponent, fail to complete your 
mission, or are killed yourself, the tournament is over.

 a. The Point System
	The way the tournament standings are decided is based on a points 
system.  Here's the way points are scored:

You have the most armies:             30  pts
You win the game:                     150 pts
You win the game by draw(Same-Time):  100 pts
You eliminate an opponent:            20  pts per opponent killed

 b. In-Depth Tournament Info
	It took about 12 hours for me to get all this information and 
get it verified so please don't come telling me that it's wrong. I went
through this mode 3 times to make sure and I still check it every time I 
go through.

KEY
 Mode - Indicates whether the round is in Classic or Same-Time modes
 Obj. - What must be done in order to win the round
 Gen. - Which Generals you will fight
 M.E. - Whether or not E. Africa and Mid. East can attack each other
 Xtra - Which optional territories are being used for the game
 T/A  - How the territories are divided up between players
 Dep. - If Manual, you pick where begininning armies go
 Con. - Determines how many bonus armies you get for owning a Continent
 T/I  - If Ascending, vaule of cards will go up after a set is traded
 Pts. - Maximum amount of points available in the round

LEVEL 1
 Mode = Classic
 Obj. = 60% Domination (25 territories)
 Gen. = Freire, Solignac, Baird
 M.E. = Enabled
 Xtra = None
 T/A  = Random
 Dep. = Automatic
 Con. = Default
 T/I  = Ascending
 Pts. = 240

LEVEL 2
 Mode = Classic
 Obj. = 60% Domination (25 territories)
 Gen. = Baird, Solignac
 M.E. = Enabled
 Xtra = None
 T/A  = Random
 Dep. = Manual
 Con. = Default
 T/I = Ascending
 Pts. = 220

LEVEL 3
 Mode = Classic
 Obj. = Conquer N. America and Australia
 Gen. = Freire, Solignac, Baird, Aubert
 M.E. = Enabled
 Xtra = None
 T/A  = Random
 Dep. = Manual
 Con. = Default
 T/I  = Ascending
 Pts. = 260

LEVEL 4
 Mode = Classic
 Obj. = Hold your Capital & conquer 3 enemy Capitals
 Gen. = Baird, Aubert, D'Erlon, Barbacena, Mackenzie
 M.E. = Enabled
 Xtra = None
 T/A  = Grab
 Dep. = Manual
 Con. = Default
 T/I  = Ascending
 Pts. = 280

LEVEL 5
 Mode = Classic
 Obj. = Conquer N. America & Africa
 Gen. = Solignac, Baird, Aubert, D'Erlon, Barbacena, Mackenzie, 
        Vauban
 M.E. = Enabled
 Xtra = None
 T/A  = Random
 Dep. = Manual
 Con. = Default
 T/I  = Ascending
 Pts. = 320

LEVEL 6
 Mode = Same-Time
 Obj. = 60% Domination (28territories)
 Gen. = D'Erlon, Barbacena, Mackenzie, Vauban
 M.E. = Enabled
 Xtra = All
 T/A  = Grab
 Dep. = Manual
 Con. = Default
 T/I  = Set Value
 Pts. = 260

LEVEL 7
 Mode = Same-Time
 Obj. = Hold your Capital & conquer 3 enemy Capitals
 Gen. = D'Erlon, Barbacena, Mackenzie, Vauban, Sherbrooke
 M.E. = Enabled
 Xtra = All
 T/A  = Grab
 Dep. = Manual
 Con. = Default
 T/I  = Set Value
 Pts. = 280

LEVEL 8
 Mode = Same-Time
 Obj. = Conquer the continent of Europe and the Territories of 
        Afghanistan, Alaska, and Indonesia
 Gen. = Barbacena, Mackenzie, Vauban, Sherbrooke, Maransin, 
        Marmonte
 M.E. = Enabled
 Xtra = All
 T/A  = Random
 Dep. = Manual
 Con. = Default
 T/I  = Set Value
 Pts. = 300

LEVEL 9
 Mode = Same-Time
 Obj. = Hold your Capital & conquer 4 enemy Capitals
 Gen. = Barbacena, Mackenzie, Vauban, Sherbrooke, Maransin, Marmont
 M.E. = Enabled
 Xtra = All
 T/A  = Election
 Dep. = Manual
 Con. = Default
 T/I  = Set Value
 Pts. = 300

LEVEL 10
 Mode = Same-Time
 Obj. = Eliminate whoever is holding Brazil (Barbacena by default)
 Gen. = Barbacena, Mackenzie, Vauban, Sherbrooke, Maransin, Marmont, 
        Campbell
 M.E. = Enabled
 Xtra = All
 T/A  = Random
 Dep. = Manual
 Con. = Default
 T/I  = Set Value
 Pts. = 320

LEVEL 11
 Mode = Same-Time
 Obj. = Hold any Continent & have a presence in all others
 Gen. = Vauban, Sherbrooke, Maransin, Marmont, Campbell
 M.E. = Enabled
 Xtra = All
 T/A  = Random
 Dep. = Manual
 Con. = Default
 T/I  = Set Value
 Pts. = 280

LEVEL 12
 Mode = Same-Time
 Obj. = 80% World Domination
 Gen. = Marmont, Campbell, Taupin
 M.E. = Enabled
 Xtra = All
 T/A  = Random
 Dep. = Automatic
 Con. = Default
 T/I  = Set Value
 Pts. = 240

LEVEL 13
 Mode = Same-Time
 Obj. = Conquer the Continents of North America and Africa
 Gen. = Marmont, Campbell, Taupin, Spencer
 M.E. = Enabled
 Xtra = All
 T/A  = Random
 Dep. = Manual
 Con. = Default
 T/I  = Set Value
 Pts. = 260

LEVEL 14
 Mode = Same-Time
 Obj. = Hold your Capital and Conquer 3 other enemy Capitals
 Gen. = Marmont, Campbell, Taupin, Spencer, Bonaparte
 M.E. = Enabled
 Xtra = All
 T/A  = Election
 Dep. = Manual
 Con. = Default
 T/I  = Set Value
 Pts. = 280

LEVEL 15
 Mode = Same-Time
 Obj. = Destroy whichever enemy holds Western United States
 Gen. = Marmont, Campbell, Taupin, Spencer, Bonaparte, Wellington
 M.E. = Enabled
 Xtra = All
 T/A  = Random
 Dep. = Manual
 Con. = Default
 T/I  = Set Value
 Pts. = 300

LEVEL 16
 Mode = Same-Time
 Obj. = 100% Domination
 Gen. = Maransin, Marmont, Campbell, Taupin, Spencer, Bonaparte, Wellington
 M.E. = Enabled
 Xtra = All
 T/A  = Election
 Dep. = Manual
 Con. = Default
 T/I  = Set Value
 Pts. = 320

4.) Game Types
	There are 3 basic types of Mission objectives that are available 
in Same-Time and Classic Modes: Captial Risk, Mission Risk, and World 
Domination Risk. Here's a brief description of each.

 4a.) World Domination
	This type pretty much explains itself. The goal is to take over 
either 60%, 80%, or 100% of the territories on the field.  This 
objective is attained if you have the said percentage at the end of your 
turn or the Battle Round (in Same-Time Mode).

 4b.) Mission
	The final type of Risk available is self-explanatory.  Each player 
is given a mission at the beginning of the game and their goal is to 
complete the objective before another player completes theirs. Examples 
of missions are: "Destroy all [color] armies owned by [General]." or " 
Conquer the continents of [Continent 1] & [Continent 2]". Others are 
"Occupy [number] territories." and "Occupy at least [number] territories 
and hold them with at least [number] armies." There are different types 
for Same-Time Risk. 

 4c.) Capital
	In this type of Risk, each player will select one of the 
territories in their possession as a Capital. The objective is to hold 
your Capital and conquer a certain number of others, depending upon how 
many players there are.

NOTE : In all games except 100% Domination or otherwise stated, you can
       click the Mission button and claim victory. This only works if
       the Mission button is flashing.

5.) I-COM
	A crucial part of playing Risk is the I-COM.  I-COM is short for 
Iconic Communications/Commands. Their are 4 different icons to use with 
the other players: 1,2,3 and "X".

NOTE: Just because there is an alliance, this doesn't always mean that 
the other person has to abide by it. The AI generals are capable of 
double-crossing you if they see fit as are you, so don't rely on it.

Level 1
	The Level 1 alliance is the most flexible of the three. It states 
that neither player involved will attack any wholly owned continent or 
the largest connected empire of the other. Any other territory is 
available for occupation.

Level 2
	A Level 2 alliance states that both players will not attack each 
other. However, it will allow one attack on an unimportant territory to 
get a RISK card.

Level 3
	This alliance is the simplest. It means that neither player will 
attack the other, period. This is the most seriously taken alliance, and 
if you break it, don't expect a break from the other person later on.

Level X
	This isn't really an alliance between you, but it is used to goad 
the enemy into an alliance or to threaten them if they have scorned you.

NOTE: All alliances will last for one turn only. If you wish to continue 
the alliance, you must do so at the start of the next turn. This means 
that if the AI makes one with you, it will expire at the start of THEIR
next turn.

6.) Generals
	One of the unique features of this game are the generals. Risk II 
has a total of 16 different AI Generals each with his own personality. 
Here, I'll attempt to give a brief description of each.

 6a.) Campbell

	Of the 16 generals in RISK II, Campbell has a reputation for being 
cautious but highly focused, especially in achieving his mission 
objectives. Some might say he allows his judgement to be clouded by his 
desire to complete the mission. Campbell is not a general to bear a 
grudge. Of all your adversaries, he is the most stable of opponents, 
with a low tendency to erratic and unpredictable behavior.

  6b.) Mackenzie
	Mackenzie, in contrast to Campbell, has a strong memory and never 
forgets the player who crosses him. Strangely, though, he does like to 
entrust his troops' safety to alliances, perhaps due in part to his high 
regard for honor and all that it entails. Mackenzie is highly aware of 
his mission and can be very aggressive if a win is in sight. He is a 
relatively stable opponent,with a below-average likelihood of erratic 
and unpredictable behavior.

 6c.) Wellington
	Wellington is a general of huge repute and is not an opponent to 
underestimate. He is highly "mission aware" and will not let his ego get 
the better of him. He makes no snap decisions and considers his war plan 
from every conceivable angle. His need to deliberate has become the 
"Wellington signature." Wellington does, however, have an unpredictable 
side and can sometimes start an action that appears to be "outside of 
his game plan" - or so one might think. This man is truly one of RISK 
II's "top drawer" generals and is a fearsome opponent.

 6d.) Bonaparte
	Bonaparte has a reputation for revenge and is regarded by all 
those who have faced him as being highly aggressive and competitive. He 
strikes quickly and without warning, often to the detriment of his own 
armies. Though his casualties are often high, his reputation is one of a 
winner and a successful, if a little cavalier, strategist. Bonaparte has 
an extreme tendency to be driven by his heart rather than his logical 
mind, which means he should be treated with caution. Unpredictable and 
erratic behavior is a Bonaparte trademark, one that has earned him a 
place at the top.

 6e.) Marmont
	Marmont is the biggest risk taker, a truly dangerous general who 
has an unsurpassed reputation for speedy, ill-considered but 
nevertheless devastating attacks. He considers little for his opponent's 
moves and for the loss of his own troops. Marmont is not highly focused 
on his mission and can, on occasion, be very unpredictable.

 6f.) Barbacena
	Barbacena is another risk taker, but unlike Marmont, is not quite 
as keen to leave his soldiers' destinies in the lap of the gods. 
Barbacena is one of those generals who, though aware of his individual 
mission, is much more focused on the bigger picture of world domination. 
Barbacena is unquestionably an aggressor; worse still, he has a good 
memory and loves revenge. He is a very worthy adversary, but is 
predictable in his desire to fight to the end.

 6g.) D'Erlon
	D'Erlon is probably the most cautious of the RISK II generals. He 
is an opponent who will rarely run the risk of losses, unless the odds 
are absolutely in his favor. He has a very high regard for honor and all 
that it brings. D'Erlon will retreat and suffer a loss of ego in a 
battle where the tables have been turned against him. He reinforces his 
armies thoughtfully and focuses on bolstering his defenses as opposed to 
building mass invasion forces. He is a strategic but perhaps 
overcautious opponent with a very stable mind and a commitment to proven 
planning.

 6h.) Maransin
	Maransin is a general with a desire to strike first and consider 
the strategy second. This general has no difficulty in swallowing his 
pride and can therefore retreat from any ill-considered battle, 
especially if the odds turn against him. This "charge in and leave 
quietly" style, together with his poor memory, has earned Maransin the 
reputation of an erratic but very dangerous neighbor. He is one to be 
watched and treated with caution.

 6i.) Solignac
	Solignac is one of the less experienced generals. To compound his 
lack of experience, Solignac has a bad memory and a habit of letting his 
bordering opponents build up without countering the threat. He does, 
however, have youthful enthusiasm on his side and should not be 
underestimated as an opponent.

 6j.) Sherbrooke
	Sherbrooke is a general of the old school. He is the most 
honorable of the opponents. Sherbrooke loves to make alliances and will 
nearly always honor the agreement. He is a slow and methodical 
strategist with a long memory. He harbors a grudge and a hatred of 
deceit. With his extensive experience in the field, Sherbrooke is not 
the kind of general to fight erratically. His trademark is consistency.

 6k.) Aubert
	Aubert cares little for alliances. Though he is not a vengeful 
player, he has little regard for the rule book. Aubert is, however, a 
very dangerous opponent who has by far the greatest tendency to become 
unstable and unpredictable. He is considered to be the most erratic of 
the RISK generals and is a danger to all around him.

 6l.) Spencer
	Spencer is a general who lives by the rule book. He uses all of 
the classic moves and never enters an ill-considered battle. Spencer is 
keen to strike alliances and is generally honorable. When the odds are 
against him, though, honor may become a casualty of war and any who have 
foolishly trusted him may find themselves to be the unsuspecting fodder 
for his cannons.

 6m.) Taupin
	Taupin is a true warmonger. He is both calculating and 
devastating. His battle plans are always well considered, and his 
distinctly unstable nature gives him an unpredictable edge that keeps 
all opponents on their guard. His constant need to monitor his borders 
makes him a real threat to all. Taupin's first and foremost objective is 
to achieve his mission. This almost unhealthy obsession is his only 
Achilles Heel.

 6n.) Friere
	Freire, like Solignac, is inexperienced in the ways of war. The 
old school of strategic warfare for him is tired and out moded; honor to 
Freire is an inconvenient load to carry. He is therefore highly 
untrustworthy. Freire, though a promising general, has much to learn, 
especially regarding his hostile borders. If left unchecked, they will 
swell and invade - a lesson he seems not to have learnt as yet.

 6o.) Vauban
	Vauban is an opponent who lives by the sword and with the words, 
"Do unto others." He has no time for honor and, when crossed, is a 
fiercely vengeful general. Being fast and decisive together with a large 
dose of aggression make Vauban a formidable enemy. Opponents should be 
acutely aware of his ability to remain constantly in control of border 
threats. They should also be wary of Vauban's pet strategy of deep, 
thrusting attacks. This general is definitely from the top drawer.

 6p.) Baird
	Baird has little honor and much aggression. His desire to avenge 
deceit is huge, coupled with a highly accurate memory and an extremely 
unstable character. Baird is among the most dangerous generals. 
Warmongering to Baird would appear to be almost of greater importance 
than the mission itself, a dangerous preconception that surrounding 
armies should heed.

7.) Special Thanks

Dad   = Got me started on this crap. After reading the original, started
        helping with getting through the Tournament for "valuable intel".

Atari = Had alot of technical info on the dice and the biographies on the
        Generals.

CJayC = It's his site that this is going onto. I also need to give him
        credit for setting up one sweet-@$$ (love those censors, don't 
        ya?) gamer site. 

8.) Legal Crap
	I hate this part the most, so I'll try keeping it short.  As of 
right now, the only sites permitted to use this FAQ are GameFAQs and 
NeoSeeker.  If you would like to use it, just send me an e-mail at the 
address above and I'll get back to you within a week. If I don't, send 
another, my Junk filter empties that often.

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