Game Trivia

  • MSX computers feature backwards compatibility with their software, including games. Any game released on the original MSX computer will also work on the MSX 2, MSX 2+ and MSX Turbo R. Games that were made for the MSX 2 for instance will not work with an MSX 1, but will also work on any model after the MSX 2.

    Contributed By: noidentity.

    0     0


  • There were four generations of the MSX computer: the original MSX was released in 1983, the MSX2 released in 1985, the MSX2+ released in 1988, and the MSX TurboR released in 1990. The first three were 8-bit computers based on the Z80 CPU, while the MSX TurboR was based on a custom 16-bit R800 microprocessor developed by ASCII Corporation.

    Contributed By: noidentity.

    0     0


  • MSX computers were manufactured by many different companies including Sony, Panasonic and Hitachi just to name a few. There are MANY different variants of the MSX computer depending on the generation of the computer, and the company that manufactured it. However, each of these machines all follow the same MSX standard in order to ensure wide compatibility with hardware and software, regardless of who the manufacturer was.

    Contributed By: noidentity.

    0     0


  • During the popularity of MSX computers, classrooms full of networked Yamaha MSX computers were used for teaching informatics in schools in some Arab countries, the Soviet Union, and Cuba, where they were wildly popular in all government education schools and centers.

    Contributed By: noidentity.

    0     0


  • As the Cuban government moved to modernize their studies of computer systems in 1985, Higher Pedagogical Institutes and some schools of Pre-University Education were supplied with Toshiba and Panasonic MSX computers with resident MSX Basic language, popularly known as "Intelligent keyboards". Once they proved useful, the Minister of Education installed similar systems throughout all Secondary (Junior High) centers and finalized it in Elementary schools, adult education institutions and "Computer and Electronic Youth Clubs" in 1987. These computer clubs allowed the Cuban government to interest and educate its citizens in computer subjects, since selling these systems, or any other personal computer for that matter to the public was illegal in Cuba.

    Contributed By: noidentity.

    0     0


  • The exact meaning of the "MSX" abbreviation is still debated today. At one time, it was thought to mean "MicroSoft eXtended", referring to the built-in "Microsoft eXtended BASIC" (MSX-BASIC), since this was adapted by Microsoft for the MSX system. Another suggested source for the abbreviation was Matsushita-Sony. However, according to Kazuhiko Nishi, the team used "Machines with Software eXchangeability" during its development. In 1985, Kazuhiko Nishi said that he named MSX after the MX missile, officially known as the LGM-118 Peacekeeper.

    Contributed By: noidentity.

    0     0


  • The exact number of MSX computers sold worldwide is not known and difficult to determine, but over 5 million units have been confirmed as the total number of sales in Japan alone.

    Contributed By: noidentity.

    0     0


  • Kazuhiko Nishi proposed to create a standard that each MSX computer was not only compatible with each other, but could run the same software. His idea was any piece of hardware or software with the MSX logo on it was compatible with MSX products, regardless of who the manufacturer was.

    Contributed By: noidentity.

    0     0


  • Microsoft conceived the development of the MSX computer as an attempt to create a universal computer standard that was openly compatible. Prior to the MSX standard, many home computers in Japan such as those by NEC and Fujitsu were incompatible with each other, and some of these computers on the same factory line could not communicate with each other as many of the machines used both different hardware and different builds of the BASIC operating system.

    Contributed By: noidentity.

    0     0


  • Kazuhiko Nishi's standard was built around the Spectravideo SV-328 computer. The hardwarw consisted primarily of off-the-shelf parts; the main CPU was a 3.58 MHz Zilog Z80, the Texas Instruments TMS9918 graphics chip with 16 KB of dedicated VRAM, the sound and partial I/O support was provided by the AY-3-8910 chip manufactured by General Instrument (GI), and an Intel 8255 Programmable Peripheral Interface chip was used for the parallel I/O such as the keyboard. This hardware was chosen to further insure compatibility because it was being used by many other home computers and games consoles of the time such as the ColecoVision home computer, and the Sega SG-1000 video game system.

    Contributed By: noidentity.

    0     0


  • To reduce the cost of MSX computers, many MSX models used a custom IC known as "MSX-Engine", which integrated glue logic, 8255 PPI, YM2149 compatible soundchip and more, sometimes even the Z80 CPU. However, almost all MSX systems used a professional keyboard hard-built into the machine instead of a detachable chiclet keyboard, which made the MSX computer more expensive compared to the original SV-328. This was a trade-off because while Microsoft's MSX BASIC made the MSX computer competitive, it was still somewhat expensive for a home computer.

    Contributed By: noidentity.

    0     0


  • The MSX standard was widely unknown in the United States as the computer market was fiercely competitive in the Western market with both the Apple and IBM standards, as well as the commodore computer line. Only Spectravideo and Yamaha briefly marketed MSX machines in the United States and they saw little success.

    Contributed By: noidentity.

    0     0


  • The MSX computer line was first announced by Microsoft on June 16, 1983, and marketed by Kazuhiko Nishi, then Vice-president of Microsoft Japan and Director of ASCII Corporation.

    Contributed By: noidentity.

    0     0


Got Some Trivia?

You can submit your own trivia, quotes, or connections for this game to share them with our users.