Game Trivia

According to the 2014 Wedbush Securities Report based on NPD sales data, the Super Nintendo ultimately outsold the Genesis in the U.S. market. Having the highest number of sales in both Japan and North America, Nintendo was able to win the 16-bit wars.

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Submitted by: Vinsky.  Rate it:

The "Blast Processing" ad was designed as a means to tote the faster clock speed of the Sega Genesis/Mega Drive. Its main competitor, the Super Nintendo, had numerically greater technical aspects than the Genesis/Mega Drive with the exception of clock speed.

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Submitted by: noidentity.  Rate it:

The Genesis represented Sega's first true victory over Nintendo in the American gaming market; prior to the release of the Genesis, they owned about 8% of the market, rising up to over 55% by 1994, becoming the dominant power at the time. (This was despite the SNES outperforming the Genesis in all ways but processing speed.)

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Submitted by: KeyBlade999.  Rate it:

While the Sega Genesis/Mega Drive enjoyed tremendous success in the United States and Europe, the console struggled to gain significant market share in Japan, as it was competing against the wildly successful Super Famicom/Super Nintendo and the successful PC Engine/Turbografx16 by NEC.

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Submitted by: noidentity.  Rate it:

With the exception of the Sega Master System's market performance in Europe, Sega's console business was struggling in the 1980s and was further threatened when NEC introduced their PC Engine console in 1987. This launch urged Sega to develop their next console which became the Mega Drive.

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Submitted by: noidentity.  Rate it:

Approximately 35 million units of the Genesis/Mega Drive were sold worldwide.

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Submitted by: noidentity.  Rate it:

The Sega Genesis was originally being planned for a January 9th, 1989 release date in North America but Sega of Japan did not have an American distributor of their own in the United States. Before opening their own American division to release the console, Sega approached Atari for distribution but CEO Jack Tramiel declined, deeming the console too expensive.

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Submitted by: noidentity.  Rate it:

The Sega Mega Drive's biggest commercial and financial success was in Europe, outperforming the Super Nintendo in sales and market share by a significant margin. The European launch of the console was secured with a much larger lineup of games in Europe than the United States in Japan since the console was already two years old at the time. The release of the Mega Drive in Europe was handled by Virgin Mastertronic, which was later purchased by Sega in 1991 and became Sega of Europe.

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Submitted by: noidentity.  Rate it:

The initial advertising for the Sega Genesis in North America was a series of television commercials toting the quote "Genesis DOES what Nintendon't!" This marketing strategy was to point out the fact that the Genesis was an all-around more powerful console than the aging but still market-holding Nintendo Entertainment System.

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Submitted by: noidentity.  Rate it:

As an effort to decrease the retail cost of the console to remain competetive in the market, the model 2 Sega Genesis/Mega Drive was introduced. Smaller than the original model 1, this version of the console also had several different hardware revisions with different chips used for video and audio processing, depending on the model. Some model 2 units made for the North American market have a slightly smaller motherboard that leaves extra space inside the console shell. These models support both RF and RCA composite video but do not support SCART RGB video.

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Submitted by: noidentity.  Rate it:

The model 3 Sega Genesis console was made by Majesco and not Sega, although Sega endorsed this product. This extremely small unit supports RF and RCA composite with only mono sound. There is no LED light on the console to indicate that it's turned on and is incompatible with the Sega 32X add-on peripheral.

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Submitted by: noidentity.  Rate it:

The Genesis/Mega Drive hardware was adapted from Sega's System 16 arcade board, which uses a Motorola 68000 processor as the main CPU and a Zilog Z80 as a secondary processor.

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Submitted by: noidentity.  Rate it:

The Sega Mega Drive was renamed the "Genesis" in the United States, allegedly due to a trademark dispute with the original name. Sega chose the name Genesis as it meant "In the beginning" which proved to be very effective marketing for the console in North America as it meant a new beginning for Sega.

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Submitted by: noidentity.  Rate it:

The original model 1 of the Sega Genesis had many different hardware revisions. Changes to each of these revisions vary from hardware chips used to the arrangement of the power and video ports on the back of the console. Video and audio processing is also slightly different with each revision. The VA6 model 1 with an EXT. port on the back is the only North American revision of the model 1 Sega Genesis that does not feature "rainbow banding" on the screen.

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Submitted by: noidentity.  Rate it:

While the North American version of the Sega Genesis/Mega Drive supports region lockout, the first title to actually support this feature was Thunder Force IV which was renamed Lightening Force in the United States. This game was released in the United States in 1992, three years after the console debuted in America in 1989.

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Submitted by: noidentity.  Rate it:

The original North American launch date of August 14th, 1989 only took place in New York City, New York and Los Angeles, California for a limited time as a test market. It was released to the rest of the United States later that year.

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Submitted by: noidentity.  Rate it:

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