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FAQ/Walkthrough by jjjx77

Version: .70 | Updated: 04/09/05

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    Table of Contents

1.  Introduction
2.  Pool Paradise Game Mechanics
    2a.  Game Controls in Pool Games
    2b.  Gameplay Terms and Mechanics
3.  Game Variants in Pool Paradise and their Rules 
    3a.  Game Rules
    3b.  Game Variants
4.  Items
5.  Sub-Games
6.  Hints and Tips
7.  Game Errata
8.  Credits
9.  Contact Information
10.  Legal Junk

----------------
1.  Introduction
----------------

So ya need help with PP eh?  Well ya came to the right place.  I know
ALL about PP.  I am the PP master.  In fact, I love PP.  I can't get
enough of it!

Hah!  Just some immature humor for you.  This FAQ is intended to give 
some introductory guidance to novice pool players.  I am in no one's
estimation an expert at pool.  If you are looking to improve your 
pool technique to an expert level you would be better served by 
searching on Google for expert pool sites, of which there are many.

Also, this guide is intended to list the various rules used by the
different game variants such as "US 8 Ball" or "Killer".  Hopefully
this will save you the headaches I experienced trying to figure out 
which games required shot nomination, which require rail contact, and
so on.  

Finally, this guide is also intended to list the various rules and
mechanics of the Sub Games.

This FAQ assumes that you are competent and intelligent enough to
navigate the in-game menu system, to pick up a cue-stick, to play a
game of pool, and to sink a ball with said stick.

--------------------------------
2.  Pool Paradise Game Mechanics
--------------------------------

This section includes:
Controls required during a game of pool 
Billiards terms and mechanics and their specific purpose and use


2a.  Game Controls in Pool Games

Control Stick - Moves your cue up, down, left, and right as well as
                your currently selected object when needed.

Control Pad - Moves contact point on the cueball.  Adds "spin" to a
	      shot.

C Stick - Moves the camera around.

A + Control Stick - Holding down the A Button and moving the control
                    stick forward or backwards results in the forward
                    and backwards movement of the cue. 

B - Cycles through various selection modes such as Moving the Cueball
    Nominating a Target Ball, and Shot Aiming.

Z + Control Stick/Pad - Allows selection of different camera views.  
                        The two most useful are "Top-Down View" and 
                        "Cue Cam".  The others are very cinematic but 
                        not very useful for gameplay.

L + Control Stick/Pad - Allows selection of the "Laser Sight" and 
                        "Hud Goggle" items.  Partially press the L
                        button, do not "click" or fully press it.
                         

2b.  Gameplay Terms and Mechanics

Spin - Achieved by changing the contact point on the cueball before
       striking it with your cue.  Left spin and right spin are also
       known as "English".  

English - If you want to remain competitive past rank 20 you need to 
          know how to apply English to a cueball.  The reason for 
          this is that correct application of English, in conjunction
          with proper shot strength, can allow near complete control 
          of the final resting spot of the cueball.  Obviously this
          allows you to better line up your next shot and to avoid 
          sinking the cueball and fouling.  

          Left spin is applied by pressing the control pad left
          before you strike the cueball.  Ditto for right spin.  If 
          you do not add top spin or bottom spin then the cueball
          will not deviate in its course after being struck by the
          cue.  Think of an object in space, spinning on its axis, 
          and you will understand why even the heaviest English will
          not, by itself, alter the course of a cueball.

          Left spin results in the cueball traveling to the left 
          after a collision.  Ditto for right spin.  The use and 
          application of this should be obvious and immediately
          useful during a game.  English will also affect the 
          left/right heading of a ball struck by the cueball.

Top Spin - Applied by pressing the control pad up before you strike
           the cueball.  Adding top spin causes the cueball to travel
           forwards farther than it would normally and to travel
           farther after contact with a rail or ball.

Back Spin - Applied by pressing down on the control pad before you 
            strike the cueball.  By adding backspin you can either
            cause the cueball to stop immediately on impact or to 
            reverse its direction and to come "back" along its 
            course of travel.  Backspin can solve that nasty problem
            of the cueball following the target ball into the pocket.

Elevating the Stick - By pressing up on the control pad before
                      striking the ball you can elevate the cue much
                      as happens when the cueball is right next to a 
                      rail.  Primarily useful for advanced maneuvers 
                      such as jumping the cueball or the professional 
                      break. Avoid elevating the cue-stick until you
                      are comfortable with basic pool physics.

Jumping the Cueball - By adding the highest level of top-spin and 
                      elevating the cue to its highest extent you 
                      can make the cueball jump after being struck.
                      Just like professional pool players you can use 
                      this to jump over an intervening ball to hit a
                      ball you want.  Experiment for different jump
                      heights and lengths.

Professional Break - On a break elevate the cue until you can
                     see about half of the end of the cue, with the 
                     random Pool Paradise pictures, on the bottom of
                     the screen.  Then add top spin until you can see
                     the complete butt (hehe) of the cue stick.  Pull
                     back and press forward for a full strength
                     strike.  When the cueball hits the 1 Ball it
                     will not stop or deviate course as usual.  
                     Instead it will move forward, plowing its way
                     through the stubborn block of balls that like
                     to stand still after a normal break.  This will
                     leave you with a nicer dispersion of balls on 
                     the table and fewer of those terrible situations
                     where two, three, or more balls clump together.
                     Now you know how to break just like those pros
                     on ESPN!  Please note that there are other
                     methods of breaking as well.  

                     Another variant professionals use is almost
                     exactly opposite of the above method.  First
                     position the cueball on a line extending from
                     the corner pocket to the 1 Ball.  Move the 
                     cueball forward a bit, about 2 hands length from
                     the end of the table.  Then instead of giving 
                     the cueball top spin give it extreme back spin.  
                     Then elevate the stick about 10 or 15 degrees.  
                     Aim at any of the first three balls in the rack.
                     Pull back and strike.  This gives a nice 
                     dispersion of balls and a lessened chance of 
                     your cueball sinking.  The drawback is that the 
                     dispersion is usually not as nice as the first 
                     method.  HOWEVER in a game like 9 Ball this 
                     method can lead to more pots and control of the
                     table.  And in a game like 9 Ball that can be
                     completed very quickly this can make the
                     difference.

Spin + Cue Elevation - Combining english, top or back spin, and cue
                       elevation can result in unusual cueball 
                       movement.  Extreme backspin plus extreme cue
                       elevation results in the cue ball jumping 
                       forward and spinning backwards on landing.  
                       This is useful when your cueball is right next
                       to a pocket and trapped behind a ball you wish
                       to sink.  English plus elevation results in 
                       the cueball curving on its trajectory.  This
                       is obviously useful when there is an illegal 
                       ball between the cueball and a desired target.
                       English plus top spin plus elevation results
                       in a jumping, curving trajectory.  Rarely of
                       any use except in extreme cases.  Extreme back 
                       spin with extreme english can cause a "hook" 
                       trajectory.  Experiment and practice to make 
                       these useful parts of your game!

--------------------------------------------------
3.  Game Variants in Pool Paradise and their Rules
--------------------------------------------------

This section includes:
Listings and explanations of game rules
Listings and explanations of the game variants


3a.  Game Rules

No Balls Sunk - In any game if you do not sink a legal ball on your
                turn then your turn is ended and control of the table
                is awarded to your opponent.

Called Shot - During a match, if you press the B button, you can call 
              up the "nominating" process.  By "nominating" a ball 
              and a pocket you are "calling" your shot.  This is 
              target nomination.  Some games require that you 
              nominate a shot for it to count.  If you do not the 
              game will end your turn and give control of the table 
              to your opponent.

Break Contact - On a break if not enough balls make contact with 
                rails/cushions a foul will be called and play passed
                to your opponent.  Your opponent may be allowed any
                number of options including: Re-racking and shooting
                him/herself, Forcing you to re-rack and shoot, or
                free placement of the cueball and control of the
                table.

Rail Contact - Certain games require, if a struck ball is not sunk, 
               that the struck ball touch the rail/cushion.  If
               a struck ball does not touch a side of the table a
               foul is called, your turn is ended, and a free cueball
               placement is awarded to your opponent. 

Ball Contact - Some games require that contact be made between the
               cueball and a target ball.  If no contact is made a
               foul is called, your turn is ended, and a free 
               cueball placement is awarded to your opponent.

Order of Contact - 6/9/10 Ball, and other games, require that the 
                   cueball contact the lowest numbered ball first on 
                   any given strike.  If the cueball makes first 
                   contact with any other ball but the lowest 
                   numbered ball on the table then a foul is called, 
                   control passed to your opponent, and a free
                   cueball placement awarded. 

3 Fouls Rule - There are games in which if you commit a foul in 3 
               consecutive turns the result is that you forfeit the
               match.     

8 Ball Contact - In US 8 Ball, UK 8 Ball, and Switchball if the 
                 8 Ball is the first ball the cueball makes contact
                 with AND all of the player's currently assigned
                 ball types have not been sunk then a foul is called,
                 free placement of the cueball awarded to your 
                 opponent, and control of the table passed to 
                 him/her.

Opponent Ball Contact - In certain games if the cueball makes first
                        contact with your opponent's ball type then
                        a foul is called, free placement of the 
                        cueball awarded, and control of the table
                        passed to him or her.

Cueball Sinking - If the cueball is sunk, in ANY game, a foul is 
                  called, a free placement of the cueball is awarded 
                  to your opponent and control of the table passed to
                  him or her.  Depending on the game a ball or balls
                  sunk with the cueball may be placed back on the 
                  table and/or the points for any such balls may not 
                  be added to your score.  Special Note:  If the 
                  cueball is jumped out of the table it is treated
                  the same as a Cueball Sinking foul.           

End Ball Sinking - Some games place special rules on when and how
                   the "end ball" can be sunk.  The end ball can be
                   anything from the highest numbered ball to the 
                   8 Ball to the 6 Ball.  In games where the end ball
                   MUST be sunk LAST there can be various results
                   from immediately losing the match to control
                   of the table and a free cueball placement being
                   awarded to your opponnent.


3b.  Game Variants

6 Ball

  Explanation:  6 balls, numbers 1 to 6, are racked in a triangle
                shape.  Players must make first contact with the
                lowest numbered ball each turn.  Any ball may be sunk
                as long as the cueball makes first contact with the
                lowest numbered ball on the table.  The goal is to 
                sink the 6 Ball.  If the 6 Ball is sunk due to 
                secondary contact it is a valid pot and the active
                player wins the game.  This can result in winning
                the match on the opening break.

  Rules:  3 Fouls Rule
          Order of Contact
          Ball Contact - Referred to as the Order of Contact rule
                         but treated as Ball Contact
          Rail Contact
          Break Contact - Referred to as the Order of Contact rule 
                          but treated as Break Contact

9 Ball

  Explanation:  9 balls, numbers 1 to 9, are racked in a diamond
                shape.  Players must make first contact with the
                lowest numbered ball each turn.  Any ball may be sunk
                as long as the cueball makes first contact with the
                lowest numbered ball on the table.  The goal is to 
                sink the 9 Ball.  If the 9 Ball is sunk due to 
                secondary contact it is a valid pot and the active
                player wins the game.  This can result in winning
                the match on the opening break.

  Rules:  3 Fouls Rule
          Order of Contact
          Ball Contact - Referred to as the Order of Contact rule
                         but treated as Ball Contact.  Results in a
                         free cueball placement for your opponent
          Rail Contact 
          Break Contact

10 Ball

  Explanation:  10 balls, numbers 1 to 10, are racked in a triangle
                shape.  Players must make first contact with the
                lowest numbered ball each turn.  Any ball may be sunk
                as long as the cueball makes first contact with the
                lowest numbered ball on the table.  The goal is to 
                sink the 10 Ball.  If the 10 Ball is sunk due to 
                secondary contact it is a valid pot and the active
                player wins the game.  This can result in winning
                the match on the opening break.

  Rules:  3 Fouls Rule
          Order of Contact
          Ball Contact - Referred to as the Order of Contact rule
                         but treated as Ball Contact.  Results in a
                         free cueball placement for your opponent
          Rail Contact 
          Break Contact

US 8 Ball

  Explanation:  All 15 balls are racked in a triangle shape.  If the 
                player who breaks pots a ball he begins play as that
                type of ball, either solids or stripes.  If the 
                player who breaks pots balls of both types he may
                choose which type of ball, solids or stripes, he 
                wants by sinking a ball of that type on his next 
                strike.  If he sinks no balls then the first player
                to sink a ball begins play as that type of ball.  The
                goal is to sink the 8 Ball.  This may only be done 
                after sinking all other balls of the player's type.  

  Rules:  End Ball Sinking - If the 8 Ball is sunk before all other
                             balls of the player's type are sunk then
                             the match is forfeited and your opponent
                             declared the winner
          Opponent Ball Contact
          8 Ball Contact
          Ball Contact
          Rail Contact
          Break Contact

UK 8 Ball

  Explanation:  15 balls, 7 Yellow and 7 Red, are racked in a 
                triangle shape.  Like US 8 Ball, ball type is decided
                by the first type of ball sunk.  The goal is to sink
                the 8 Ball, again like US 8 Ball.  There are special
                rules that apply only to UK 8 Ball.  First, in all
                cases where a free cueball placement would apply
                instead a free cueball placement behind the
                headstring is awarded - The headstring is the spot or
                dotted line behind or on which the cueball is placed
                before a break.  Second, after any foul, the opposing
                player is given two consecutive turns.  

  Rules:  End Ball Sinking - If the 8 Ball is sunk before all other
                             balls of the player's type are sunk then
                             the match is forfeited and your opponent
                             declared the winner
          Opponent Ball Contact
          8 Ball Contact
          Break Contact
          Ball Contact

Switchball

  Explanation:  Fundamentally identical to US 8 Ball with one 
                exception.  There is a unique "switchball" which, if
                pocketed, switches the type of ball currently 
                assigned to each player.  The player pocketing
                solids now pockets stripes and vice versa for the
                opposing player.  After pocketing the switchball it
                returns to its approximate previous position to
                be pocketed again if desired.  In all other ways
                Switchball is identical to US 8 Ball.

  Rules:  End Ball Sinking
          Opponent Ball Contact
          8 Ball Contact
          Ball Contact
          Rail Contact
          Break Contact

15 Ball

  Explanation:  All 15 balls are racked in a triangle.  Any ball is
                a valid target.  There are no opponent balls.  There
                is no end ball.  If a ball is sunk its number, 1 to 
                15, is awarded as points.  Multiple balls may be sunk
                on any turn.  When one player's points outnumber the 
                opponent player's points by more than are left on the
                table the game is over by numerical elimination.
 
  Rules:  Special Rule -  All fouls also incur a penalty of -3 points 
                          to the fouling player's score. 
          Ball Contact - Instead of awarding the opponent a free
                         cueball placement, control of the table is
                         passed to the opposing player.
          Rail Contact - Instead of awarding the opponent a free
                         cueball placement, control of the table is
                         passed to the opposing player.
          Break Contact - Standard break options are given to the
                          opponent player.
          Cueball Sinking - Instead of awarding the opponent player
                            a free cueball placement, a free cueball 
                            placement behind the headstring is 
                            awarded.
                         
14 to 1
  
  Explanation:  All 15 balls are racked in a triangle.  Any ball is a
                valid target.  There are no opponent balls.  There is
                no end ball.  If a ball is sunk 1 point is awarded
                to the active player.  Multiple balls may be sunk
                but only 1 point is awarded on any single turn.  
                When one player reaches the target points total of 25
                or 50 the game is over and the achieving player is 
                declared the winner. 

  Rules:  Special Rule - All fouls also incur a penalty of -1 point 
                         to the fouling player's score.
          Break Contact - Standard break options are given to the 
                          opponent player.
          Called Shot - A shot must be nominated to be valid.
          Ball Contact - Instead of awarding the opponent a free
                         cueball placement, control of the table is
                         passed to the opposing player.    
          Rail Contact - Instead of awarding the opponent a free
                         cueball placement, control of the table is
                         passed to the opposing player.

Bowlliards

  Explanation:  Designed to resemble bowling.  Each player alternates
                having complete control of the table.  Each player
                turn consists of a break and two misses ("Sets").  If
                the player sinks all ten balls in one set a "strike"
                score is given.  If the player sinks all ten balls in
                two sets a "spare" score is given.  If a player fails
                to sink a ball twice his/her turn is over and the
                number of balls sunk is given as a score.  A match
                consists of 20 alternating frames, 10 for each
                player.  The player with the highest score at the
                end of the match is the winner.  

  Rules:  Special Rules - If the cueball is sunk 1 point is 
                          subtracted from the fouling player's score.
                          All ball placement after fouls is confined 
                          to the area behind the headstring.

Rotation

  Explanation:  Fundamentally the same as 15 Ball.  The main 
                difference is that like 6/9/10 Ball the balls must be
                sunk in their numerical order from lowest to highest.
                Unlike 15 Ball there is no point penalty for fouls. 
                In all other ways Rotation is played as 15 Ball.
 
  Rules:  Special Rule - On any foul the opponent player is given the 
                         option to play or pass.  Except for Cueball 
                         Sinking the "cueball placement" option is 
                         not given for any foul.
          3 Fouls Rule
          Break Contact
          Rail Contact
          Ball Contact
    
Killer
 
  Explanation:  All 15 balls are racked in a triangle.  Any ball is
                a valid target.  There is no end ball.  There are no
                opponent balls.  The simple goal is to sink a ball
                every turn.  It is not necessary to sink a ball on 
                the break.  If no ball is sunk on a given turn, the
                player who failed to sink a ball has 1 life point
                removed.  Each player starts with 3 or 5 life points.
                The first player to lose all life points loses the
                match.

  Rules:  Special Rule - All fouls result in a free cueball placement
                         in addition to a lost life point.
          Break Contact
          Ball Contact

Trickshot

  Explanation:  An open table with no opponent, just 15 balls.  Have
                fun.  Experiment.  Try out cueball jumping or 
                practice your English!

  Rules:  None

---------
4.  Items
---------

This section includes a listing and explanation of the items
available for purchase in the shop.  This section includes *SPOILERS*

Gadgets

  Laser Sight:  Selected via the L button during a match.  Projects a
                thin red line straight out from the cuestick.  Allows
                for precise aiming of the cueball.  Well worth the 
                measly $100.  Buying the laser sight should be the
                first thing you do after you visit the Loan Shark at
                the beginning of the game.  Not usable in 2 Player
                mode.  

  Hud Goggles:  Selected via the L button during a match.  Gives 
                you a super cheat mode in which the game displays
                the current trajectories and paths that will result 
                from your current aiming of the cueball.  This means 
                the HUD Goggles allow you to see exactly what will be 
                the result of your shot.  
                
                This sounds extremely useful but there are a few 
                catches.  First, the HUD Goggles have a battery life.
                Because of this the HUD Goggles only last about as 
                long as 2 to 4 average length matches.  Second, they
                are expensive at $5000.  

                This high price and short life mean they are useful 
                in only a few applications.  Use them to make money
                in high stakes matches against the the highest ranked
                competitors.  Or use them to win tournaments.  

                Not usable in 2 Player mode.

Sub-Games:  Mini-Games have to be purchased at the Shop before they 
            can be selected in the main menu.  Each mini-game adds
            a new option to the main menu.
Items

  Stuffed Dodo:  Places a large stuffed dodo inside a display case in
                 the competition room.  Costs $2500.  Seems to have 
                 no purpose besides decoration.  Amusing?  Maybe.
                 Useful?  No.  Aesthetically pleasing?  Not at all.

  Fireworks:  After completing the game (by reaching first place) 
              can be purchased for $1500.  Allows you to see the
              fireworks display again.

Baizes - Baizes are the felt tops of the pool tables.  Purchase new
         baizes to change the boring purple top to something 
         interesting like a blue galaxy design.  Every new baize
         costs $1500.

Crazy Tables - Crazy tables add oddly shaped tables to the 
               "Crazy Tables" room in which you can play practice
               mode on tables such as Ice Hockey or Triangle.  Every
               new table costs $2500.

Cues - Purchase differently textured cues for $500 each.  None of 
       them perform differently in a match.  None of them get rid of
       the annoying randomized texture on the butt of the cuestick.  
    
-------------
5.  Sub-Games 
-------------

This section includes a listing and explanation of the sub-games.

Dropzone

  Explanation:  I'm not sure about the history of this one but it
                plays like Midway's Defender.  Control stick to move,
                A button to shoot, B button for a screen bomb, 
                X button for a "cloak".

Coconut Shy

  Explanation:  A simple game, like Windwaker's cannon shoot.  Line
                up your cannon to knock the coconuts off the sticks.
                Extra points awarded for consecutive hits.  Hitting
                the pole the coconut rests on will result in a hit. 
                2 Rounds worth of shooting. 

Darts

  Explanation:  Darts.  Good old darts.  Press A to pick up a dart.
                Pull back on the control stick to ready the dart.
                Press forward to throw the dart.  Different speeds
                and forces on the control stick result in different
                dart velocities.  The manual mentions the C Stick 
                moves the camera, however it also moves the dart.  
                This results in much easier aiming of the dart.

Skeeball

  Explanation:  Just like skeeball at the local arcade.  Line up your
                shot and press A.  Shot strength is determined by the
		length of the arrow at the time the A button is 
		pressed.  Score points for the more difficult shots. 

Hidden Cave *Spoiler Alert*

  Explanation:  Purchase and then goto the practice table.  Choose 
                any game, any opponent.  Press Start, choose your
                inventory, select the sub-game screen, select the
                Hidden Cave map.  Goto the Hidden Cave when prompted
                to partake in "Switchball".  Note:  Some people
                suggest that facing a particular direction is 
                required to access the cave.

------------------
6.  Hints and Tips
------------------

Money: 

There are certain games you want to avoid in competition matches. 
These are Bowlliards, 14 to 1, UK 8 Ball if you are foul prone, and
6 Ball against very skilled opponents.  UK 8 Ball and 6 Ball are very
easy to lose against very skilled (15th or higher rank) opponents. 
Bowlliards and 14 to 1 take way, way too long for competition when
you could be playing 15 Ball, Killer, or 9 Ball.

Geometry:

As my pappy used to tell me, when I was just a tyke standing at the
pool table, "pool is a game of angles".  When you play a game look
at everything on the table as triangles, squares, rectangles, and
angles.  Even if you got a D in Geometry in High School you should
soon be able to see how the cueball striking a ball results in a
triangular trajectory.  Changing the cueball's striking point on a
target ball will change that triangulation.  Aim the cueball to the 
left to force the target ball right.  Aim the cueball right to force
the target ball left.  Hitting straight on and hard is bad almost
every single time you try it.  I'll restate these concepts because 
they are so important.

Visualize Your Shot:

You really have to visualize your shot to be successful at pool.  If
you can't do this then you'll never be able to sink a ball from 
further than a few inches.  Visualizing your shot is easy if you keep
in mind both the physics of pool and the geometry of the table and
balls.  After that it is just a matter of mentally drawing a straight
line extending from your cueball to your target and calculating the
effects of your aim and any spin applied.

Aim Your Shot:

Just remember that the target mark always starts centered.  If you 
don't apply spin via the cross pad it will be very easy to center a 
shot.  Aiming left of center results in the target traveling right, 
aiming right of center results in the target traveling left.  
Visualize this anyway you want - A circle with wedges, straight lines
and angles (as the HUD Goggles represent), or spinning orbs in space.

Visualize a straight line starting from your cue-stick and cue-ball 
and extending into, and past the target ball.  As you change the 
angle of attack that visualized line splits.  SOOO if you aim juuuust 
left of target your cueball will travel slightly left and your 
target will travel slightly right.  Imagine a peace sign and you'll 
understand.

The farther left or right you aim the farther right or left the 
target travels and the farther left or right the cueball travels 
after impact.  This pattern is normal until you start aiming far left 
or right of the center of the target.  In which case the curvature of 
the pool balls causes the triangulation to alter slightly such that 
the cueball's trajectory is altered LESS by the off-center aiming and 
the target ball's altered MORE by the off center aiming.  Which 
eventually results in the "kissing"/"slicing" effect I mention later
in the FAQ where if you "slice" a spot about the size of a dime on the 
target ball then the target ball travels at a 90 degree angle from 
the visualized line and the cueball, more or less, travels straight 
from the cuestick.

Change Your Shot Strength:

It is a mistake to hit every shot hard.  Change you shot strength to
better control where the cueball will stop after a shot.  Change your
shot strength to control how far the target ball will travel.

Learn to Kiss:

Learn how to "kiss" a ball with the cueball.  I dont mean a soft tap.
I mean when you have a target ball at the side pocket and your 
cueball runs a parallel course to that ball you can hit your cueball
and "slice" or "kiss" just the smallest portion of the target ball
to result in a 90 degree motion of the target ball.  You can see this
in action when the higher ranked computer players hit a ball sitting 
right on the edge of a rail which sends it flying straight along the 
rail to sink in what seems an almost impossibly difficult shot.  This 
is easy once you get used to "kissing" or "slicing".  Just imagine 
an area the size of a dime directly opposite the pocket and situated
on the very edge of the ball.  Your target is that area.  It sounds
Star Wars-esque but is actually fairly easy once you get used to it.

Practice:

Alot.

---------------
7.  Game Errata
---------------

Manual Page 13 - There is no 3 Foul Rule in 15 Ball.

Cover - This game is not "Only for GameCube".  There will be PS2 and
        XBox versions and there already is a PC version.

Laser Sight in Multiplayer - Start a 1 Player Game.  In a match turn
                             the Laser Sight on and save.  Then load
                             the save file as a 2 Player Game and the
                             saved player as first player.  You 
                             should have Laser Sight stuck on 
                             permanently.  This is a glitchy trick 
                             but should work.
          
                             *NOTE* - I have not gotten this trick
                             to work.  Attempt at your own risk.

-----------
8.  Credits
-----------

Ultimate Yoshi:  Pointed out the "Only for Gamecube" error.  Figured
                 out and detailed the "Laser Sight in Multiplayer" 
                 trick.  

Jetman:  Pointed out the inability to use Laser Sight or HUD Goggles
         in 2 Player mode.

Maddgamz:  For prompting me to write this FAQ.

NecroKnightBlade / CMK8:  Explained how to use the HUD Goggles 
                          to make money.

Kevin Lee: A.K.A. "Kleptul" on GameFaqs.  Explained shot strength in 
	   the "Skeeball" mini-game.  

sonicking917: Contributed the fireworks item information.

GameFaqs:  For being awesome.

Ignition Entertainment:  Made Pool Paradise.

-----------------------
9.  Contact Information
-----------------------

Send any suggestions, corrections, additions, requests, or insults
to: jjjx03@yahoo.com

---------------
10.  Legal Junk
---------------

This FAQ may not be reproduced under any circumstances except for 
personal, private use. It may not be placed on any web site or 
otherwise distributed publicly without advance written permission.
Use of this guide on any other web site or as a part of any public 
display is strictly prohibited, and a violation of copyright.

This FAQ was written for Gamefaqs.com in part as thanks for the many
years I have enjoyed and partaken of its services.  Please do not
e-mail requesting permission to use this FAQ because you will not
receive said permission.  I am becoming aware of many similar sites
to Gamefaqs.com and am in the process of evaluating these sites.  If
I find your site to be an admirable, free, pleasant, and useful 
service for gamers I will approach you with this FAQ.

All trademarks and copyrights contained in this document are owned 
by their respective trademark and copyright holders.

Copyright 2004 - Javier Jimenez

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