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Version: 1.00 | Updated: 03/03/11

  Akko de Pon Guide - Version 1.00 - 3 March 2011 - by Barticle at hotmail.com
              ___________________________________________________
             |  _______________________________________________  |
             | |   __           _     __   __    __   _        | |
_____________| |  |__| |_/ |_/ / \   |  \ |_    |__) / \ |\ |  | |______________
             | |  |  | | \ | \ \_/   |__/ |__   |    \_/ | \|  | |
             | |_____.-----------------------------------._____| |
             |_______|  I K A S A M A   H O U R O U K I  |_______|
                     '-----------------------------------'

       01 INTRODUCTION        06 CHEATING              08 SINGLE-PLAYER
       02 FEATURE LIST           o Draw-Loading           o Characters
       03 BEGINNING PLAY         o Deal-Loading        09 MULTIPLAYER
       04 MAIN MENU              o Special Loading     10 STATS
       05 GAMEPLAY               o Switches            11 OPTIONS
          o Controls             o Stashing            12 RULES
          o Command Menu         o Reading                o Rule Options
          o Top Screen           o Co-Op                  o Fixed Rules
          o Bottom Screen        o Exposing Cheats     13 CONTACT
          o Score Display     07 STORY MODE            14 THANKS

------< INTRODUCTION >-------------------------------------------- [Section 01]

This is a guide to the 2008 Japanese DS* game "Akko de Pon! Ikasama Hourouki".

Although you wouldn't know it from the title, it's a mahjong game - you play
standard four-player Japanese mahjong (not the tile-matching solitaire thing).
The key selling points are that you can use a wide range of cheating techniques
(see Section 06) and the characters are voiced by celebrities from Horipro - a
major showbiz agency in Japan that's home to many comedians, models and actors.

I've tried to use both Japanese and the equivalent English mahjong terminology
throughout this guide, in most cases giving the oriental term first and the
English version afterwards in brackets. I know that some purists will object to
my use of the terms Chow, Pung and Kong when referring to Japanese mahjong but
these are the words I learnt from my first mahjong game and they've been pretty
much standard in English texts on mahjong for around ninety years so I'm quite
comfortable with their use here.

Obviously if you can read Japanese you'll be able to read the instruction manual
and the menus in the game so this guide is aimed primarily at English speakers.
You shouldn't be daunted by the Japanese text as there are only a few short
menus and options pages. The layout of these is mirrored in this guide so you
should be able to find your way around the game without any difficulty.

To limit the length of this document I've decided to omit full details of the
rules and equipment of mahjong on the assumption that anyone buying this game
will probably already be familiar with them. If you are new to the game, or you
play a version other than the modern Japanese "Riichi" rules that appear in this
game, then you might like to read my complete guide to the terminology and rules
of Japanese mahjong. It's available as a 74-page, illustrated, linked PDF and
can be accessed from the United States Pro Mahjong League download page.

  http://www.uspml.com/site/downloads.htm  (Barticle's Japanese Mahjong Guide)

If you want to discuss Japanese mahjong then join the international community of
enthusiasts on Reach Mahjong's English forums. Hope to see you there. :)

                    http://www.reachmahjong.com/en/forum

This guide is designed to be viewed using a monospaced (non-proportional or
fixed-width) font, preferably Courier New. Some sections of the document will
display incorrectly if you are using a proportional font like Times New Roman.

*I've uploaded this guide for the Wii version of the game too. From what I've
seen of screenshots, the content is pretty similar so my info should be sound.

------< FEATURE LIST >-------------------------------------------- [Section 02]

Since it can be difficult to find any detailed information in English about the
content of a foreign game I like to include a quick description of the gameplay
features when I write a guide for a Japanese game - so here it is!

o Download Play and Wireless Play for 2 to 4 players

o Standard single-player and story modes

o no online play

o two save slots for separate player profiles

o modern Japanese mahjong rules including Riichi, Dora and red fives

o seven configurable rule options available in free play (see Section 12)

o 25 unlockable cheating techniques with 76 variants (see Section 06)

o eighteen opponents including cartoon versions of twelve Japanese celebs

o display shows full wall and all tile movements including shuffle and deal

o option to view your hand unarranged (in random order)

o gameplay is slower than other games, but all games are one round in duration

o no Dora or wait alerts

o no Furiten indicator

o gameplay requires a combination of button and stylus input

o good stats for gameplay, Yaku use and cheat use (see Section 10)

o in-game text tutorials for rules and cheating

o 46-page full colour manual

o Japanese language only

------< BEGINNING PLAY >------------------------------------------ [Section 03]

On the title screen press the Start button or tap the touchscreen and you'll be
given a choice of two save slots - DATA 1 (red) and DATA 2 (yellow). It doesn't
matter which one you choose - just pick one and keep using the same one. Either
tap the one you want or select with the d-pad and press the A button to confirm.

The first time you do this you'll be prompted to enter your name using the on-
screen keyboard. Your name can be up to six characters in length which is pretty
generous compared to some Japanese games!

By default the keyboard shows Japanese hiragana characters but you can press L/R
to cycle between katakana and English letters. You can press A to pick a letter
or B for backspace. There are three buttons to the right of the keyboard - the
top (blue) one also backspaces, the middle (green) one is used to convert a kana
character into a smaller version (for digraphs and sukuon) or an English capital
letter into lower-case and the bottom (also green) button gives a blank space.

When you're ready press Start to continue, then pick the left option to confirm
and you'll be taken to the main menu (see next section). Alternatively you can
press Select if you want to return to the previous screen for some reason.

.--------. The next time you re/start the game you'll be prompted to pick one of
|  Play  | the save slots and the game will give you three options. The top one
| Delete | (blue) is to play the game, the middle button (green) is to erase the
| Return | player profile (pick the left option to confirm deletion) and the
'--------' bottom one (green again) cancels and returns to the profile select.

------< MAIN MENU >----------------------------------------------- [Section 04]

The main menu for the game has seven options. Here and elsewhere in the game you
can use the d-pad to select, A to confirm and B to cancel.

The three primary options for play are given on the top row in diamond, circle
and square shapes respectively. Below that are four supplementary options given
in rectangular boxes. These seven are presented in the following arrangement...

         STORY MODE             SINGLE-PLAYER              MULTIPLAYER
      (see Section 07)         (see Section 08)          (see Section 09)

            MAHJONG CLASSROOM         UNDERGROUND MAHJONG CLASSROOM

             MATCH STATISTICS                    OPTIONS
             (see Section 10)               (see Section 11)

The Mahjong Classroom has seven predominantly text-based lessons about the basic
rules of mahjong. Once you select one you can page forwards with A (or R), back
with X (or L) and quit out with B.

The Underground Mahjong Classroom has a similar format but it explains and
illustrates twenty-three* of the cheating techniques that are available for use
in the game. See Section 06 for more information on all these.

*There are twenty-five core techniques in total but, since it fully explains
Bukko Nuki and Tsubame Gaeshi, the "underground mahjong" tutorial doesn't have
separate sections for Bukko Nuki loading or Tsubame Gaeshi loading.

------< GAMEPLAY >------------------------------------------------ [Section 05]

This section describes the process of playing a game in any of the play modes.

= Controls =

Let's start with an explanation of the controls because they aren't many!

d-pad left/right - select tile to discard / page through cheat menus

        d-pad up - open command menu (see below)

                   The command menu appears automatically whenever you have the
                   option of performing an action but you can also open it with
                   d-pad up whenever it's your turn.

        A button - confirm action

                   This is the main button you use to do anything in the game -
                   draw a tile, discard a tile, select a cheat or pick an option
                   from the command menu.

        B button - cancel

        X button - open cheat menus

                   Whenever it's possible to use a cheat you can press X to open
                   the cheat menus (the format is explained in Section 06).

                   You can page through the tabs with L/R or d-pad left/right,
                   scroll with d-pad up/down, pick a cheat with A or close the
                   menus with B.

                   Any cheats which you cannot currently use (because you lack
                   the required power points or the context is wrong) will be
                   shown greyed-out.

 L button (hold) - hide command menu

                   Whenever the command menu is open you can render it invisible
                   by holding L. This can be useful if the game is offering you
                   a call (like Pon) but you can't see which tile is available
                   because the menu is obscuring it!

                   A word of caution - using this function restores the command
                   menu to the default action (cancel). For example, you might
                   get the command menu pop-up offering you a win, you press up
                   to highlight the win option but before confirming you hide
                   the menu to check which tile is offered - when you release L
                   you must now select win again. That caught me out a few times
                   when I first started playing. Missed a few wins. :(

= Command Menu =

o Suspend   The command menu always has seven options. Unavailable choices will
o Pon       be shown in grey, available ones in pale yellow and the currently
o Chii      selected option will be highlighted in bright yellow.
o Kan
o Riichi    The sixth option is always to declare a win but it will vary between
o Ron/Tsumo either Ron or Tsumo depending on the context. The top and bottom
o Cancel    options are always available, others appear only when relevant.

You can use the first option to exit and save the game so that you can return to
it later. Pick the left option (yes) to confirm and exit or the right option
(no) to return to the game. The next time you launch the same game mode you'll
be prompted to resume the suspended match - pick the left option to confirm. If
instead you pick the right option, then the left option to confirm, the saved
game will be deleted and you can start a new one.

To help you follow the command menu, here are the options available:-
               __
  __|__   |\|/|
 |  |  |  |-+-|---  CHUUDAN
 |__|__|  |/|\| |   - suspension (save the game and exit - can reload later)
    |     |__/  |

  __|__o  \
    |        /  PON
  / | \     /   - call Pung (steal a discard tile to complete a Pung set)
   .'      /

  -----
  __|__  _____  CHII
    |           - call Chow (steal a discard tile to complete a Chow set)
   /

  _|__   \
   |  |     /  KAN
   |  |    /   - call Kong (steal a discard tile to make a Kong set)
  /  /    /    - declare a Kong using a self-drawn tile

  |  |        -----
  |  |  ____  __|__  RIICHI
    /           |    - declare Riichi (make a ready bet)
   /           /

  .-----.  \  
  |     |     /  RON
  |     |    /   declare Ron (announce a win on an opponent's discarded tile)
  |_____|   /

  \\  /  -------
     /      |     TSUMO
    /     --+--   declare Tsumo (announce a win on a self-drawn tile)
   /        |__  
      ____   ____
     /____|     /
    /  /\      /__   MODORU
   / -/--\-       \  return (to the game)
  /  /    \   O___/

The default option on the menu is usually the bottom one so you can dismiss the
menu by pressing either B (to cancel) or A (to pick that option).

= Top Screen =

Although it also shows menus and other displays pertaining to the cheats, the
top screen usually shows the general information like scores and seat-winds.

In the top-left corner is the hand count which shows how far through the game
you are. There will be three characters. The first will always be east because
all games are played over a single (east) round and the third character is Kyoku
which denotes a hand of play. The middle character will be the number 1, 2, 3 or
4 using the Chinese/Japanese numbers from the Manzu (Craks) suit tiles.

In the top-right corner are two scoring-stick counters. The first one counts the
number of 1000-point Riichi sticks on the table and the second shows the Honba
count, i.e. the number of consecutive previous hands that resulted in either a
draw or a dealer win. A representation of an 8-dot 100-point scoring-stick is
shown here because the dealer's sticks are usually used as counters.

Your three opponents are depicted at the left, top and right, corresponding to
their seating positions. Under their picture is their name, their score and a
power gauge showing the number of cheat power points they have available (see
Section 06). If a player has three orange characters over their portrait this
indicates that they are your "Konbi" partner and are available for co-op cheat
techs. Your name, score and power gauge are also shown on the touchscreen.

The gold squares indicate the player's current seat-winds and the orange square
is the Chiicha mark which indicates which player was the first to be east. This
usually doubles as a round-wind indicator but of course it will always show east
in Akko de Pon (unless you use the Shaanyuu rule option - see Section 12).

A grey rectangle will appear at the bottom-right corner to display your "stash"
after using the three-tile draw cheat (#69) and another will be shown in the
bottom-left corner after using some of the reading cheats (see Section 06).

= Bottom Screen =

The touchscreen gives a fairly realistic and uncluttered simulation of a mahjong
table. Since various cheats can be used at different stages of play, the game
shows the full process of play including the shuffle, dice roll and deal. These
will usually be automated but you can interact with the shuffle or deal by using
the appropriate cheats (see Section 06 again).

When you're the dealer you are required to roll the dice. These will be shown in
rotation on the bottom screen and you can either press A or tap the dice to stop
them individually. If you've loaded tiles in your wall with a cheat tech the
dice will roll more slowly so you can select which number they land on. ;)

Unlike other mahjong games you're also required to press the button each turn to
draw your next tile (because you might choose to use a cheat). If you're using
the stylus then you can also tap the little red box to the right of your hand.

Your hand of tiles is shown along the bottom of the screen and your opponents'
are displayed along the three other sides. Since the full wall is included in
the layout there's no need for a separate display for either the Dora indicators
or the number of tiles remaining.

The dice are always shown in the top-right corner of the wall - they are *not*
used to indicate which player is dealer.

The MENU text can be tapped to open the command menu (equivalent to pressing up
on the d-pad). There's no CHEAT button though so you need to press the X button
to cheat and therefore you cannot play the game exclusively using the stylus.

A hand ends in an exhaustive draw when no further tiles are available (leaving
the fourteen tiles of the dead wall on the table). Any players with a Tenpai (or
"ready" hand - one tile away from complete) will display their hand and receive
their share of the 3000-point No-Ten Bappu payment. Coloured text is shown to
indicate which players are Tenpai (orange text) or No-ten (blue text).

= Score Display =

When a win is declared, the winning hand will be revealed on the virtual table.
You must either press A or tap the screen to continue to the score screen.

The box at the top-left shows the hand counter, winner's seat-wind and the Honba
count while the one at the top-right displays the full dead wall with any active
Dora indicators revealed (and any Kong supplement tiles absent).

                     .--------------.    .----------------.
 hand count and --> (  #=#  ##  1##  )   |   [][][][][][] | <-- dead wall tiles
winner's seat-wind   '--------------'    | [][][][][][][] |    (Dora indicators)
                  .-------------^        '----------------'
    Honba count --' .--------------------------------------.
   Yaku present --> | ##          ###          K7 4        | <-- Dora count
                    |                                      |
                    :======================================:
Fu & Han counts --> | 40#  6#                     ###  ### |
Non-dealer pays --> | 7  3000                     ###  ### | <-- limit applied
    Dealer pays --> | #  6000                     ###  ### |       (if any)
  Riichi sticks --> | ==== X 00                            |
    Honba count --> | ==== X 01                ##  12300 # | <-- total value
                    |  _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _  _        |
   winning hand --> | |_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_|_||_|       | <-- winning tile
                    '--------------------------------------'

The top section of the main box lists all Yaku (scoring elements) or Yakuman
(limit-hands) applied along with a count of the Dora present.

The main body then gives a breakdown of the score including the Fu (minipoints)
and Han (doubles) totals, the payment/s to be made, the number of Riichi sticks
available, the Honba count (again), the limit applied if any (e.g. Haneman) and
the total value of the win.

The tiles of the winning hand are displayed at the very bottom of the screen.
 
Tap the screen or press A and the necessary points payment/s will be made.

------< CHEATING >------------------------------------------------ [Section 06]

The "Ikasama" in the game's title means "cheating" so you might expect to see a
little cheating. Well, you won't be disappointed! It's a big part of the game -
and a big part of this guide. B)

Cheating techniques must be unlocked by winning matches in Story Mode before you
can use them in either Story Mode or Single-Player mode. If you see eight tiles
with Japanese text appear on the top or bottom screen after a game that means
that you've unlocked another one or two techniques.

Most of the cheats require quite precise touchscreen input so keep your stylus
handy. In some cases you will be given on-screen prompts to "touch" or "slide"
but these are labelled in English so easy to follow.

In order to use one of the cheats a player must expend some of their constantly
replenishing supply of power points. The "cheating power gauge" for each player
is shown on the top screen under their score. At the start of a match it will be
empty (so no-one can cheat!) but the players gain a small amount of power points
each time they take their turn drawing from the wall, and they receive a bonus
when they win a hand. The power points cost for each cheat technique is given in
the listing below. After completing Story Mode your power gauge (and only yours)
will be full at the start of each game. :)

Cheats are context-sensitive and fall broadly into two categories: ones applied
during the shuffle and ones applied during play, although some can only be used
in specific situations and within a very narrow window of time (see below).

The cheat menu can be accessed during the game by pressing X. If you're playing
Single-Player mode with cheats disabled or you're yet to learn any cheats or
none of your learnt cheats can be used in the current situation, then the button
will do nothing! When it does appear it will have a tabbed structure - use L/R
or d-pad left/right to page through the tabs and d-pad up/down to cycle through
the cheats listed on the current tab (NB these lists wrap, i.e. when you hit the
last item on the list it'll jump to the first one). Press A to select a cheat.

You'll see different tabbed lists during either shuffling or normal play. When
you have all the cheats unlocked they'll appear in the following order. If you
have trouble following the text then try using the points costs for reference.

For each cheat the first number is its reference number (see listing below or
count through the cheat listing on pages 41-46 of the manual) and the second
figure is the number of power points required to execute it.

The following cheats are available during shuffling. They're all loading techs.
 ________________________    ________________________    _____________________
/ Genroku (draw-loading) \__/ Bakudan (deal-loading) \__/   Special Loading   \_

 01 Yakuhai          70      27 Yakuhai          70      54 Bukko Nuki      80
 02 Iipeikou         50      28 Dora             60      55 Tsubame Gaeshi 100
 03 Pinfu            10      29 Iipeikou         50      56 Ni no Tenhou    90
 04 Tanyao           10      30 Pinfu            10      57 Go no Tenhou    90
 05 Chii-Toitsu      20      31 Tanyao           10
 06 Ikkitsuukan      20      32 Chii-Toitsu      20
 07 San Shoku Doujun 30      33 Ikkitsuukan      20
 08 San Shoku Doukou 30      34 San Shoku Doujun 30
 09 Chanta           50      35 San Shoku Doukou 30
 10 Honitsu          80      36 Chanta           50
 11 San Ankou        50      37 Honitsu          80
 12 Honroutou        40      38 San Ankou        50
 13 Shou San Gen     90      39 Honroutou        40
 14 Junchan          50      40 Shou San Gen     90
 15 Chinitsu         40      41 Junchan          50
 16 Dai San Gen      80      42 Chinitsu         40
 17 Shou Suu Shii    80      43 Dai San Gen      80
 18 Suu Ankou        70      44 Shou Suu Shii    80
 19 Tsuuiisou        80      45 Tsuuiisou        80
 20 Ryuuiisou        70      46 Ryuuiisou        70
 21 Chinroutou       80      47 Suu Ankou        70
 22 Kokushimusou     80      48 Chinroutou       80
 23 Chuurenpoutou    60      49 Kokushimusou     80
 24 Suu Kantsu       60      50 Chuurenpoutou    60
 25 Dai Sharin       60      51 Suu Kantsu       60
 26 Dai Suu Shii     60      52 Dai Sharin       60
                             53 Dai Suu Shii     60

During the initial deal and in play you'll get the following lists instead.
 ___________________   _______________   ___________________   _______________
/      Switches     \_/    Stashing   \_/      Reading      \_/     Co-Op     \_

 58 Bukko Nuki    50   69 San Hai   80   72 Ni Mou Pai    10   75 Tooshi    30
 59 Haipai        40      Tsumo          73 Haji Mou Pai  30   76 Okurikomi 80
    Bukko Nuki         70 Erebeetaa 70   74 Ganpai       100
 60 San Hai Nuki  60   71 Modoshi   70  
 61 Fuuji Nuki    10      Tsumo
 62 Tsubame      100
    Gaeshi 
 63 Nigirikomi    60
 64 Tsumo Surikae 40
 65 Yama Surikae  20
 66 Kawa Surikae  90
 67 Yama Zurashi  20
 68 Dora Kaeshi   80

A lot of the techniques involve or rely upon "loading" which is when you plant
tiles into your wall section during the shuffling phase so that you can retrieve
them later. This requires an understanding of the process of wall-building and
dealing - these things are usually not displayed in mahjong video-games so I'll
give a quick recap before I go on to describe the cheat techniques individually.

================================================================================

At the start of each hand the 136 tiles are shuffled on the table. If you were
being strict you might require that all the tiles are turned face-down but in
informal play this restriction would not apply. Once the tiles are adequately
shuffled each player constructs a wall section consisting of seventeen stacks
of two tiles (34 tiles total).
               __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __
              |__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|
              |__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|

Each player lifts or pushes their complete section forward so that a square is
formed; in Japanese mahjong this is known as the Yama (mountain) but in English
it's usually called the wall (for obvious reasons).

        3,7,11         Now the dealer (the player with a current seat-wind of
        _____          east) rolls two dice into the centre of the wall. This
       |     |         will determine which of the four wall sections is broken
4,8,12 |     | 2,6,10  and at what point. Using the number rolled, the dealer
       |_____|         counts counter-clockwise around the table starting with
                       themselves. You'll notice that the dealer (shown at the
         5,9           bottom) will pick their own wall on a throw of 5 or 9.

The same dice roll is used to indicate the point at which the wall is broken,
counting stacks from the right end of the wall section (as viewed from outside
the wall). The seven tile-stacks immediately to the right of the break (wrapping
around a corner if necessary) constitute the Wanpai (in English: dead wall) and
the top tile in the third stack from the left will be flipped as the indicator
for the Dora bonus tile. The tiles to the left of the break become the start of
the live wall from which players take their tiles.

So for example if the dealer threw a 10 on the dice the wall section belonging
to the player to his right (south) would be broken, specifically at a point ten
tiles in from the right end.
  _____         __ __ __ __ __ __ __ | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __
 |     |       |__|__|__|__|__|__|__|||__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|
 |     | <---  |__|__|__|__|__|__|__|||__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|
 |_____|        (start of live wall) | <--- dead wall ---> | (end of live wall)

Now the initial "deal" begins, although each player collects their own tiles and
therefore the so-called dealer (the original Japanese term Oya means "parent")
doesn't actually deal! Working counter-clockwise around the four players (east,
south, west, north, etc) and starting with east, each player takes four tiles
(starting at the end of the live wall and consuming it in a clockwise direction)
and then another four and another four, so each now has twelve. Then each player
takes one more tile (thirteen each) and the dealer takes another (giving them
fourteen tiles) which is equivalent to them taking their first turn. In practice
(and in this game) the dealer can take their thirteenth and fourteenth tiles at
the same time (in Japan this is known as "Chon-Chon" - onomatopoeia I think).

      (east's wall)            ( s o u t h ' s   w a l l )
    __ __ __ __ __ __     __ __ __ __ __ __ __ | __ __ __ __ __ __ __  __ __ __
   |WW|SS|SS|EE|EE|NN|   |NN|WW|WW|SS|SS|EE|EE|||__|__|DD|__|__|__|__||__|__|__|
...|WW|SS|SS|EE|EE|NN|   |NN|WW|WW|SS|SS|EE|EE|||__|__|__|__|__|__|__||__|__|__|
etc                                            |

Finally now play commences with east discarding a tile. Players then take turns
in counter-clockwise order, drawing a single tile from the end of the live wall 
and discarding a tile. Unless the turn order is disrupted by a call (Chii, Pon
or Kan) each player will repeatedly draw either top or bottom tiles and even- or
odd-numbered tiles, so for example in the diagram below the north player takes
their tiles from the bottom of the even-numbered stacks.

               17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10  9  8  7  6  5  4  3  2  1
               __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __
              |EE|WW|EE|WW|EE|WW|EE|WW|EE|WW|EE|WW|EE|WW|EE|WW|EE|
              |SS|NN|SS|NN|SS|NN|SS|NN|SS|NN|SS|NN|SS|NN|SS|NN|SS|

Play continues until either someone declares a win or the end of the live wall
is reached (always leaving the fourteen tiles of the dead wall).

================================================================================

Now the take-home message from this is "dice = random"! When you load your wall
with tiles there's a fair chance that the dice roll will give a wall break that
causes some or all of your loaded tiles to be taken by your opponents during the
deal. This will be a waste of your effort (and power points) and could even give
the other player/s an advantage.

There are two ways to react to this. Firstly you can just risk it - load your
tiles and hope that you get a favourable dice roll. Secondly you can wait until
the seat-winds rotate and you become dealer because then you get to roll the
dice yourself. When you're east and you've loaded your wall, the game will slow
down the rotation of the dice which makes it much easier to pick your numbers.
The numbers always rotate in sequence: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 1, 2... etc.

For the Bakudan loading techniques (see below) you must get a 5. For other ones
(for example Tsubame Gaeshi) I like to aim for a 3 or a 4 because then the wall
will break on west or north's side leaving your wall section intact. Watch out
for the large red dot of the 1 and then press the A button - hopefully you'll
get a 2 on the first dice because then you can aim for either a 1 or a 2 on the
second one to give 3 or 4 overall. If you press too soon on the first dice and
get 1 try to press a split-second later on the other to get a 2.

= Draw-Loading =

The Genroku era in Japan ran from 1688 to 1704; the name is spelt with two kanji
that mean "beginning allowance". Here it refers to a technique which involves
loading tiles into your wall in such a way that you'll be able to draw them
during play, giving you the tiles you need to complete any given Yaku (scoring
element) or Yakuman (limit-hand). I'm calling this "draw-loading".
         __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __
  e.g.  |__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|
        |__|__|__|__|__|__|##|__|##|__|##|__|##|__|##|__|##|
                            '-----'-----'-----'-----'-----'--- loaded tiles

Instead of a single versatile technique, there are 26 separate techniques for
draw-loading, each used to load for a different specific Yaku or Yakuman. These
techs must be learnt individually during Story Mode play.

The loaded tiles are planted in alternate positions on either the top or bottom
layer of your wall section, so in draw order every fourth tile has been loaded
and will be drawn by the same player.

There are three complications to using draw-loading. The first is that another
player's dice roll may cause your loaded tiles to be taken during the initial
deal (as explained above). The second is that there's only a one in four chance
that you'll be the playing drawing these tiles so you may need to use calling
(Chii or Pon) to alter the turn order or other cheats to change the tile order.
The third is that the computer-controlled players are quite inclined to calling
tiles themselves so even if you are drawing the loaded tiles someone could make
a call and disrupt the turn sequence.

When you're dealer and have loaded tiles you'll be able to influence the dice
roll to retain your load during the deal and determine the draw order. If you
throw a 7 for example this will consume half of west's wall and all of south's
wall (except one tile) and you will be drawing even-numbered tiles from the top
layer of your wall from the start of play.

As with all the other loading techniques, the loaded tiles in your wall will be
displayed with grey backs.

01  Name: Genroku Yakukai Zumi (Yakuhai draw-loading)

    Cost: 70 power points

    When: During shuffling

  Effect: The first Genroku technique loads three identical "value-tiles" into
          your wall. Although the illustration shows Chun (red dragon), you can
          choose to use any dragon, the round-wind or your current seat-wind,
          but the easiest to spot are probably the Haku (white dragon). If you
          successfully draw these from the wall during play you get Yakuhai (for
          a Pung of value-tiles).

          If you are the current dealer then you can load east wind tiles and
          score two Han (doubles) for round-wind and seat-wind Yakuhai.

          With an Ankou (concealed Pung) you will probably have the option to
          call the fourth matching tile to form a Minkan (open Kong).

     How: During the shuffle you need to pick out three identical value-tiles
          as described above.

02  Name: Genroku Iipeikou Zumi (Pure Double Chow draw-loading)

    Cost: 50 power points

    When: During shuffling

  Effect: Loads six tiles for Ipeikou (Pure Double Chow), a one-Han Yaku awarded
          for two identical Chows.

     How: During the shuffle you must pick two identical runs of tiles - with
          the same numbers (e.g. 345 345) and in the same suit. You can load
          these six in any order.

          You can only claim Iipeikou on a closed hand so if you call any tiles
          from your opponents' discards you'll lose it.

03  Name: Genroku Pinfu Zumi (Pinfu draw-loading)

    Cost: 10 power points

    When: During shuffling

  Effect: Loads tiles for Pinfu, a one-Han Yaku awarded for a "no points" hand
          that receives no additional Fu (minipoints) beyond the basic 20 or 30
          for going out, i.e. a hand where all four sets are Chows, the pair is
          not composed of value-tiles and the closed hand is completed on a two-
          sided Ryanmen wait (e.g. _67_ waiting on 5 or 8).

     How: Pick out tiles during the shuffle.

04  Name: Genroku Tanyao Zumi (All Simples draw-loading)

    Cost: 10 power points

    When: During shuffling

  Effect: Loads tiles for Tanyao (All Simples), a one-Han Yaku awarded for a
          hand where all the tiles are Simples - suit tiles with numbers between
          2 and 8 inclusive.

     How: Pick out tiles during the shuffle.

05  Name: Genroku Chii-Toitsu Zumi (Seven Pairs draw-loading)

    Cost: 20 power points

    When: During shuffling

  Effect: Loads tiles for Chii-Toitsu (Seven Pairs), a two-Han Yaku awarded for
          completing a special hand composed of seven different pairs.

     How: Pick out tiles during the shuffle.

06  Name: Genroku Ikkitsuukan Zumi (Pure Straight draw-loading)

    Cost: 20 power points

    When: During shuffling

  Effect: Loads tiles for Ikkitsuukan (Pure Straight), a Yaku awarded for making
          three consecutive Chows in the same suit (i.e. 123, 456 and 789). This
          is worth two Han in a closed hand or one Han in an open one.

          Like the following load, this will give you a good head-start towards
          making Pinfu too.

     How: Pick out tiles during the shuffle.

07  Name: Genroku San Shoku Doujun Zumi (Mixed Triple Chow draw-loading)

    Cost: 30 power points

    When: During shuffling

  Effect: Loads tiles for San Shoku Doujun (Mixed Triple Chow), a Yaku claimed
          when you hold three Chows with the same numbers, one set in each suit.
          This gives two Han in a closed hand or one in an open one.

     How: Pick out tiles during the shuffle.

08  Name: Genroku San Shoku Doukou Zumi (Triple Pung draw-loading)

    Cost: 30 power points

    When: During shuffling

  Effect: Loads tiles for San Shoku Doukou (Triple Pung), a rare Yaku awarded
          for three Pungs with the same numbers, obviously one in each suit.
          This is worth two Han although since all three sets will be concealed
          you will also be able to claim San Ankou (Three Concealed Pungs) for
          an extra two.

     How: Pick out tiles during the shuffle.

09  Name: Genroku Chanta Zumi (Mixed Outside Hand draw-loading)

    Cost: 50 power points

    When: During shuffling

  Effect: Loads tiles for Chanta (Mixed Outside Hand), awarded for a hand where
          every set (and the pair) contains a Terminal or Honour tile. This is
          worth two Han in a closed hand or one in a closed one.

     How: Pick out tiles during the shuffle.

10  Name: Genroku Honitsu Zumi (Half-Flush draw-loading)

    Cost: 80 power points

    When: During shuffling

  Effect: Loads tiles for Honitsu (Half-Flush) - a hand containing both Honours
          and tiles from one of the suits. This is worth three Han in a closed
          hand or two if open.

     How: Pick out tiles during the shuffle.

11  Name: Genroku San Ankou Zumi (Three Concealed Pungs draw-loading)

    Cost: 50 power points

    When: During shuffling

  Effect: Loads tiles for San Ankou (Three Concealed Pungs), a two-Han Yaku for
          having three self-drawn Pungs in your hand.

          As I noted above, you can get San Ankou stacked with San Shoku Doukou
          by using cheat #08. This gives two Han more and yet it costs 20 fewer
          power points! This one is easier to use however because you're not
          constrained to find nine tiles all with the same number.

     How: Pick out tiles during the shuffle.

12  Name: Genroku Honroutou Zumi (All Terminals & Honours draw-loading)

    Cost: 40 power points

    When: During shuffling

  Effect: Loads tiles for Honroutou (All Terminals & Honours), a rare two-Han
          Yaku awarded for a hand comprised only of Terminal and Honour tiles.
          Such a hand will always give either Toi-Toi Hou (All Pungs) or (Chii-
          Toitsu (Seven Pairs) so you automatically get another two Han on top.

          I haven't unlocked this tech yet but I assume you load pairs with a
          view to making Pungs with them.

     How: Pick out tiles during the shuffle.

13  Name: Genroku Shou San Gen Zumi (Little Three Dragons draw-loading)

    Cost: 90 power points

    When: During shuffling

  Effect: Loads tiles for Shou San Gen (Little Three Dragons), a Yaku awarded
          for two Pungs of dragons plus a pair of dragons. It's worth two Han
          but you also get two more for double Yakuhai.

     How: Pick out tiles during the shuffle.

14  Name: Genroku Junchan Zumi (Pure Outside Hand draw-loading)

    Cost: 50 power points

    When: During shuffling

  Effect: Loads tiles for Junchan (Pure Outside Hand), a Yaku achieved by having
          a hand where all four sets and the pair contain Terminal tiles. It's
          worth three Han if the hand is closed or two Han if open.

     How: Pick out tiles during the shuffle.

15  Name: Genroku Chinitsu Zumi (Full Flush draw-loading)

    Cost: 40 power points

    When: During shuffling

  Effect: Loads tiles for Chinitsu (Full Flush), the most valuable Yaku giving
          six Han (closed) or five Han (open) for a hand composed only of tiles
          from a single suit.

     How: Pick out tiles during the shuffle.

16  Name: Genroku Dai San Gen Zumi (Big Three Dragons draw-loading)

    Cost: 80 power points

    When: During shuffling

  Effect: Loads tiles for Dai San Gen (Big Three Dragons), a Yakuman limit-hand
          formed from three Pungs of dragons (plus any other set and a pair).

     How: Pick out tiles during the shuffle.

17  Name: Genroku Shou Suu Shii Zumi (Little Four Winds draw-loading)

    Cost: 80 power points

    When: During shuffling

  Effect: Loads tiles for Shou Suu Shii (Little Four Winds), a Yakuman awarded
          for making three wind Pungs and a wind pair (and any other set).

     How: Pick out tiles during the shuffle.

18  Name: Genroku Suu Ankou Zumi (Four Concealed Pungs draw-loading)

    Cost: 70 power points

    When: During shuffling

  Effect: Loads tiles for Suu Ankou (Four Concealed Pungs), a Yakuman awarded
          for a hand containing four Pungs made entirely from self-drawn tiles
          (plus any pair).

     How: Pick out tiles during the shuffle.

19  Name: Genroku Tsuuiisou Zumi (All Honours draw-loading)

    Cost: 80 power points

    When: During shuffling

  Effect: Loads tiles for Tsuuiisou (All Honours), a Yakuman awarded for a hand
          containing only Honour (wind and dragon) tiles.

     How: Pick out tiles during the shuffle.

20  Name: Genroku Ryuuiisou Zumi (All Green draw-loading)

    Cost: 70 power points

    When: During shuffling

  Effect: Loads tiles for Ryuuiisou (All Green), a Yakuman awarded for a hand
          containing only the pure green tiles in a mahjong set, i.e. Hatsu (the
          green dragon) and the 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8 tiles in the Souzu (Bams) suit.

     How: Pick out tiles during the shuffle.

21  Name: Genroku Chinroutou Zumi (All Terminals draw-loading)

    Cost: 70 power points

    When: During shuffling

          Requires adjacent Konbi partner

  Effect: Loads tiles for Chinroutou (All Terminals), a Yakuman awarded for any
          hand containing only Terminals (1 and 9 numbered suit tiles).

     How: Pick out tiles during the shuffle.

22  Name: Genroku Kokushimusou Zumi (Thirteen Orphans draw-loading)

    Cost: 80 power points

    When: During shuffling 

          Requires adjacent Konbi partner

  Effect: Loads tiles for Kokushimusou (Thirteen Orphans), a Yakuman comprised
          of one each of all thirteen Terminals and Honours plus one duplicate.

     How: Pick out tiles during the shuffle.

23  Name: Genroku Chuurenpoutou Zumi (Nine Gates draw-loading)

    Cost: 60 power points

    When: During shuffling 

          Requires adjacent Konbi partner

  Effect: Loads tiles for Chuurepoutou (Nine Gates), a Yakuman consisting of a
          concealed flush hand of 1112345678999 plus one duplicate.

     How: Pick out tiles during the shuffle.

24  Name: Genroku Suu Kantsu Zumi (Four Kongs draw-loading)

    Cost: 60 power points

    When: During shuffling 

          Requires adjacent Konbi partner

  Effect: Loads tile for Suu Kantsu (Four Kongs), a Yakuman awarded for a hand
          containing any four Kongs (and a pair).

     How: Pick out tiles during the shuffle.

25  Name: Genroku Dai Sharin Zumi (Big Wheels draw-loading)

    Cost: 60 power points

    When: During shuffling

          Requires adjacent Konbi partner

  Effect: Loads tiles for Dai Sharin (Big Wheels), an optional Yakuman awarded
          for a concealed 22334455667788 flush in the Pinzu (Dots) suits.

     How: Pick out tiles during the shuffle.

26  Name: Genroku Dai Suu Shii Zumi (Big Four Winds draw-loading)

    Cost: 60 power points

    When: During shuffling 

          Requires adjacent Konbi partner

  Effect: Loads tiles for Dai Suu Shii (Big Four Winds), a double Yakuman made
          from four wind Pungs (and any pair).

     How: Pick out tiles during the shuffle.

= Deal-Loading =

This is a different type of loading that involves planting tiles into your wall
in blocks of four (i.e. two stacks) with twelve tiles between them (six stacks)
such that you'll be able to collect the loaded tiles during the initial deal
when each player in turn draws four tiles from the wall. In Japanese this cheat
technique is called Bakudan ("bomb") loading but I'm calling it "deal-loading".

As with draw-loading above, there are 26 variations of this - each one used to
load for a specific Yaku or Yakuman, but there's also one extra for Dora loading
(#28) so there are 27 individual deal-loading techniques in total.

With the exception of Dora loading, the tiles will always be loaded into stacks
6, 7, 14 and 15 of your wall section (counting from the right) as shown below...

                      17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10  9  8  7  6  5  4  3  2  1
                      __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __
                     |__|__|##|##|__|__|__|__|__|__|##|##|__|__|__|__|__|
                     |__|__|##|##|__|__|__|__|__|__|##|##|__|__|__|__|__|
      loaded tiles ----------'--'--------------------'--'

Since it's vital that you get a favourable dice roll for deal-loading, you can
only use these techniques when you are the dealer. The dice will rotate more
slowly when you've successfully loaded a wall so it's easier to fix the result.
You always need to roll a 5 for deal-loading to work. This ensures that it is
your wall that is broken and that the break is five tiles in from the right end.

On the first dice look out for the big red dot of 1, when you see the 2 that
follows press X and you should get a 3. On the second dice press X when you see
the 1 to get the 2, giving a total of 5. I can do this pretty reliably, although
I use the A button and it might be different if you use the stylus/touchscreen.

The next diagram shows the wall break and the order in which the players collect
their tiles from the wall, four at a time - east, south, west, north.

        17 16 15 14 13 12 11 10  9  8  7  6  5  4  3  2  1
        __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __|__ __ __ __ __
       |SS|SS|EE|EE|NN|NN|WW|WW|SS|SS|EE|EE|__|__|__|__|__|
       |SS|SS|EE|EE|NN|NN|WW|WW|SS|SS|EE|EE|__|__|__|__|__|
                                           |<---------------- wall break

So when you're east and you throw a 5 on the dice you will always receive the
tiles from stacks 6, 7, 14 and 15 from your own wall.

27  Name: Bakudan Yakuhai Zumi (Yakuhai deal-loading)

    Cost: 70 power points

    When: During shuffling

          You must be the current dealer (east)

  Effect: Loads tiles for two Yakuhai sets.
                           __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __|__ __ __ __ __
                          |__|__|##|##|__|__|__|__|__|__|##|##|__|__|__|__|__|
                          |__|__|__|##|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|##|__|__|__|__|__|
           loaded tiles ----------'--'--------------------'--'|<---- wall break

          Although you only load six tiles instead of the possible eight, the
          locations of the blocks within your wall are the same as usual so you
          still need to roll a 5 on the dice.

     How: During the shuffle pick two sets of three identical value-tiles in any
          order - these could be dragons, round-wind or seat-wind.

          Since you must be dealer to use Bakudan loading, a Pung of east tiles
          will be worth two Han since it is both round-wind and your seat-wind.

          Then you must get a 5 on the dice roll.

28  Name: Bakudan Dora Zumi (Dora deal-loading)

    Cost: 60 power points

    When: During shuffling 

          You must be the current dealer (east)

  Effect: Although the actual loading of tiles is the same as usual, the theory
          behind this one is more complicated - and so is my diagram. B)

          This loading technique is based around adding Dora to a hand instead
          of adding Yaku. You load a block (two stacks) of four identical tiles
          near the right end of your wall - the top-left of these will become
          the standard Omote Dora indicator tile in the dead wall and the other
          three are possible Kan Dora, Ura Dora and Kan Ura Dora indicators.

          You also load another block of four identical tiles near the centre of
          your wall. Crucially these must be of the same suit and have a face
          value one greater than the first set you loaded, so if your indicators
          are 4's then you load a block of 5's. (I guess you could also use the
          winds or dragons following their sequence.)
                                                      .----- Dora indicator
                                wall break -->|       |  .-- Kan Dora indicator
           __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __|__ __ _' _' __
          |__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|$$|$$|__|__|##|##|__|
          |__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|$$|$$|__|__|##|##|__|
             loaded Dora tiles -----------'--'|       |  |      ## = loaded N
                                 Ura Dora indicator --'  |      $$ = loaded N+1
                             Kan Ura Dora indicator -----'

          Now you just need to get a 5 on your dice roll so your wall is broken
          five tiles in from the right. The five stacks there will become the
          first five stacks of the dead wall and the top-left loaded tile will
          be flipped as the Dora indicator. As dealer you are the first player
          to take tiles in the deal and the first block of four you collect will
          be the other group of tiles you loaded.

          Instantly your hand has four Dora! Once play commences you can declare
          a concealed Kong using the loaded tiles, the Kan Dora indicator will
          be flipped and now you have eight Dora. You can safely start calling
          tiles by Chii and Pon now because even if you go out with a (usually)
          cheap Tanyao (All Simples) hand it'll be worth 9 Han (doubles) and you
          get paid at the Baiman limit. :D

          Of course if you manage to build a Tenpai (ready) hand without calling
          you can declare Riichi and if you win you get to apply the Ura Dora
          and Kan Ura Dora indicators you planted and you have a hand worth at
          least 17 Han - more than enough for Kazoe Yakuman (counted Yakuman)!

          Alternatively you may prefer to not declare the Kong, build a Tenpai
          hand, reach and get eight Dora on your win for a guaranteed Baiman.

          One advantage of this technique is that you don't have to worry about
          any of your opponents having Dora because you have them all! :) They
          could still have red fives though of course and if a second Kong is
          declared that will add a new (different) Kan Dora (and Kan Ura Dora).

     How: Pick out the tiles during the shuffle, then roll a 5 on the dice.

29  Name: Bakudan Iipeikou Zumi (Pure Double Chow deal-loading)

    Cost: 50 power points

    When: During shuffling 

          You must be the current dealer (east)

  Effect: Loads tiles for Iipeikou (Pure Double Chow).

     How: Pick out the tiles during the shuffle, then roll a 5 on the dice.

30  Name: Bakudan Pinfu Zumi (Pinfu deal-loading)

    Cost: 10 power points

    When: During shuffling 

          You must be the current dealer (east)

  Effect: Loads tiles for Pinfu ("no points" hand).

     How: Pick out the tiles during the shuffle, then roll a 5 on the dice.

31  Name: Bakudan Tanyao Zumi (All Simples deal-loading)

    Cost: 10 power points

    When: During shuffling 

          You must be the current dealer (east)

  Effect: Loads tiles for Tanyao (All Simples).

     How: Pick out the tiles during the shuffle, then roll a 5 on the dice.

32  Name: Bakudan Chii-Toitsu Zumi (Seven Pairs deal-loading)

    Cost: 20 power points

    When: During shuffling 

          You must be the current dealer (east)

  Effect: Loads tiles for Chii-Toitsu (Seven Pairs).

     How: Pick out the tiles during the shuffle, then roll a 5 on the dice.

33  Name: Bakudan Ikkitsuukan Zumi (Pure Straight deal-loading)

    Cost: 20 power points

    When: During shuffling 

          You must be the current dealer (east)

  Effect: Loads tiles for Ikkitsuukan (Pure Straight).

     How: Pick out the tiles during the shuffle, then roll a 5 on the dice.

34  Name: Bakudan San Shoku Doujun Zumi (Mixed Triple Chow deal-loading)

    Cost: 30 power points

    When: During shuffling 

          You must be the current dealer (east)

  Effect: Loads tiles for San Shoku Doujun (Mixed Triple Chow).

     How: Pick out the tiles during the shuffle, then roll a 5 on the dice.

35  Name: Bakudan San Shoku Doukou Zumi (Triple Pung deal-loading)

    Cost: 30 power points

    When: During shuffling 

          You must be the current dealer (east)

  Effect: Loads tiles for San Shoku Doukou (Triple Pung).

     How: Pick out the tiles during the shuffle, then roll a 5 on the dice.

36  Name: Bakudan Chanta Zumi (Mixed Outside Hand deal-loading)

    Cost: 50 power points

    When: During shuffling 

          You must be the current dealer (east)

  Effect: Loads tiles for Chanta (Mixed Outside Hand).

     How: Pick out the tiles during the shuffle, then roll a 5 on the dice.

37  Name: Bakudan Honitsu Zumi (Half-Flush deal-loading)

    Cost: 80 power points

    When: During shuffling 

          You must be the current dealer (east)

  Effect: Loads tiles for Honitsu (Half-Flush).

     How: Pick out the tiles during the shuffle, then roll a 5 on the dice.

38  Name: Bakudan San Ankou Zumi (Three Concealed Pungs deal-loading)

    Cost: 50 power points

    When: During shuffling 

          You must be the current dealer (east)

  Effect: Loads tiles for San Ankou (Three Concealed Pungs).

     How: Pick out the tiles during the shuffle, then roll a 5 on the dice.

39  Name: Bakudan Honroutou Zumi (All Terminals & Honours deal-loading)

    Cost: 40 power points

    When: During shuffling 

          You must be the current dealer (east)

  Effect: Loads tiles for Honroutou (All Terminals & Honours).

     How: Pick out the tiles during the shuffle, then roll a 5 on the dice.

40  Name: Bakudan Shou San Gen Zumi (Little Three Dragons deal-loading)

    Cost: 90 power points

    When: During shuffling 

          You must be the current dealer (east)

  Effect: Loads tiles for Shou San Gen (Little Three Dragons).

     How: Pick out the tiles during the shuffle, then roll a 5 on the dice.

41  Name: Bakudan Junchan Zumi (Pure Outside Hand deal-loading)

    Cost: 50 power points

    When: During shuffling 

          You must be the current dealer (east)

  Effect: Loads tiles for Junchan (Pure Outside Hand).

     How: Pick out the tiles during the shuffle, then roll a 5 on the dice.

42  Name: Bakudan Chinitsu Zumi (Full Flush deal-loading)

    Cost: 40 power points

    When: During shuffling 

          You must be the current dealer (east)

  Effect: Loads tiles for Chinitsu (Full Flush).

     How: Pick out the tiles during the shuffle, then roll a 5 on the dice.

43  Name: Bakudan Dai San Gen Zumi (Big Three Dragons deal-loading)

    Cost: 80 power points

    When: During shuffling 

          You must be the current dealer (east)

  Effect: Loads tiles for Dai San Gen (Big Three Dragons).

     How: Pick out the tiles during the shuffle, then roll a 5 on the dice.

44  Name: Bakudan Shou Suu Shii Zumi (Little Four Winds deal-loading)

    Cost: 80 power points

    When: During shuffling 

          You must be the current dealer (east)

  Effect: Loads tiles for Shou Suu Shii (Little Four Winds).

     How: Pick out the tiles during the shuffle, then roll a 5 on the dice.

45  Name: Bakudan Tsuuiisou Zumi (All Honours deal-loading)

    Cost: 70 power points

    When: During shuffling 

          You must be the current dealer (east)

  Effect: Loads tiles for Tsuiisou (All Honours).

     How: Pick out the tiles during the shuffle, then roll a 5 on the dice.

46  Name: Bakudan Ryuuiisou Zumi (All Green deal-loading)

    Cost: 80 power points

    When: During shuffling 

          You must be the current dealer (east)

  Effect: Loads tiles for Ryuuiisou (All Green).

     How: Pick out the tiles during the shuffle, then roll a 5 on the dice.

47  Name: Bakudan Suu Ankou Zumi (Four Concealed Pungs deal-loading)

    Cost: 70 power points

    When: During shuffling 

          You must be the current dealer (east)

          Requires adjacent Konbi partner

  Effect: Loads tiles for Suu Ankou (Four Concealed Pungs).

     How: Pick out the tiles during the shuffle, then roll a 5 on the dice.

48  Name: Bakudan Chinroutou Zumi (All Terminals deal-loading)

    Cost: 70 power points

    When: During shuffling 

          You must be the current dealer (east)

          Requires adjacent Konbi partner

  Effect: Loads tiles for Chinroutou (All Terminals).

     How: Pick out the tiles during the shuffle, then roll a 5 on the dice.

49  Name: Bakudan Kokushimusou Zumi (Thirteen Orphans deal-loading)

    Cost: 80 power points

    When: During shuffling 

          You must be the current dealer (east)

          Requires adjacent Konbi partner

  Effect: Loads tiles for Kokushimusou (Thirteen Orphans).

     How: Pick out the tiles during the shuffle, then roll a 5 on the dice.

50  Name: Bakudan Chuurenpoutou Zumi (Nine Gates deal-loading)

    Cost: 60 power points

    When: During shuffling 

          You must be the current dealer (east)

          Requires adjacent Konbi partner

  Effect: Loads tiles for Chuurenpoutou (Nine Gates).

     How: Pick out the tiles during the shuffle, then roll a 5 on the dice.

51  Name: Bakudan Suu Kantsu Zumi (Four Kongs deal-loading)

    Cost: 60 power points

    When: During shuffling 

          You must be the current dealer (east)

          Requires adjacent Konbi partner

  Effect: Loads tiles for Suu Kantsu (Four Kongs).

     How: Pick out the tiles during the shuffle, then roll a 5 on the dice.

52  Name: Bakudan Dai Sharin Zumi (Big Wheels deal-loading)

    Cost: 60 power points

    When: During shuffling 

          You must be the current dealer (east)

          Requires adjacent Konbi partner

  Effect: Loads tiles for Dai Sharin (Big Wheels).

     How: Pick out the tiles during the shuffle, then roll a 5 on the dice.

53  Name: Bakudan Dai Suu Shii Zumi (Big Four Winds deal-loading)

    Cost: 60 power points

    When: During shuffling 

          You must be the current dealer (east)

          Requires adjacent Konbi partner

  Effect: Loads tiles for Dai Suu Shii (Big Four Winds).

     How: Pick out the tiles during the shuffle, then roll a 5 on the dice.

= Special Loading =

This section contains four further loading techniques. The first two require the
use of a separate cheat to "collect" the tiles later, while the second two only
need a rigged dice roll for the payoff.

54  Name: Bukko Nuki Tsumi (Bukko Nuki loading)

    Cost: 80 power points

    When: During shuffling

  Effect: Pick four tiles that will be added to the left end of your section of
          the wall. These will be shown with grey backs and can be retrieved
          later using the Bukko Nuki technique (#58) as long as the dice roll is
          in your favour and leaves your loaded tiles undisturbed.

          (Bukko Nuki only takes two tiles so you'll need to do it twice if you
          want to collect both pairs.)
                          __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __
                         |##|##|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|
                         |##|##|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|
          loaded tiles ----'--'

          If the wall breaks in the wrong place your loaded tiles will be taken
          during the initial deal - most likely by your opponents. :6 In fact
          there's an even chance that once lucky person will get all four.

          The most useful tiles to load for Bukko Nuki are probably matching
          pairs of dragons, round-wind and seat-wind (remember to check your
          current seat-wind) as you can Pon these for Yakuhai and maybe Honitsu
          (Half-Flush). With dragons loaded and a little luck in your draw you
          might even be able to make Dai San Gen (Big Three Dragons). :D I think
          the best load for that would be one pair of one colour and one each of
          the other two in the hope of making pairs off the initial deal. Make
          sure you perform Bukko Nuki early to recover your planted dragons and
          make your pairs before your opponents start dropping the other drags.

          That's how I got my first Yakuman (limit-hand) in this game. ;)

          Also watch out for the valuable red five tiles which you can load in
          conjunction with neighbouring tiles from the same suit that would make
          a Chow (i.e. 34_, 4_6, _67) or another 5 for a pair, or just take all
          the red fives in the hope of drawing tiles that fit around them.

     How: During the shuffle pick the four tiles you want to load into the wall.

55  Name: Tsubame Gaeshi Tsumi (Tsubame Gaeshi loading)

    Cost: 100 power points

    When: During shuffling

  Effect: You use this technique to plant a complete hand of tiles at the left
          end of the lower row of your wall section. If your wall remains intact
          after the deal you can collect the hand using Tsubame Gaeshi (#62).
                          __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __
                         |__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|
                         |##|##|##|##|##|##|##|##|##|##|##|##|##|__|__|__|__|
          loaded tiles ----'--'--'--'--'--'--'--'--'--'--'--'--'

          You could build a Pinfu hand with Chows like 234, 567, 678, etc, but I
          think it's easier to spot the Honour tiles and build Pungs of dragons
          and winds. If you can't find three matching tiles then just take two
          so you can Pon the third during play. Try to keep count of which tiles
          you're loading - picking four identical tiles is a waste.

          If your loaded tiles form a complete hand of four sets and a pair (or
          possibly Chii-Toitsu (Seven Pairs) or Kokushimusou (Thirteen Orphans))
          then you can declare a win on your first turn with the Yakuman (limit-
          hand) Chiihou or Tenhou. If you don't manage to make a complete hand
          you should be able at least to give yourself a very good head-start.

          Tsubame Gaeshi must be performed *immediately* after the initial deal
          has concluded - don't forget! It's easy to get distracted. :\

     How: During the shuffle you must pick out either fourteen tiles (if you're
          the dealer) or thirteen tiles (non-dealer) against a time-limit.

          That's a lot of tiles to load so you can't hang about. If you can see
          a lot of wind tiles then the quickest way to achieve a good result is
          just to pick as many of them as possible - their black markings are
          easy to spot and you should get enough for Shou/Dai Suu Shii (Little
          or Big Four Winds) and beaucoup points. :D When you run out of winds,
          start loading dragons and you could make Tsuuiisou (All Honours) too
          giving you a double Yakuman!

          You need to allow a little time for each selected tile to be loaded so
          don't expect to be able to pick tiles in rapid fire. Wait about half a
          second between tapping each tile.

          It took me several attempts but I have successfully made the special
          thirteen-sided version of Kokushimusou (Thirteen Orphans) using this
          technique. You need to load as many unique Terminals and Honours as
          possible - I can usually get eleven out of a possible thirteen. You
          can then use other cheating techs to complete the ready hand - use the
          feeding technique (#76) to request tiles from your partner (do this as
          early as possible because they'll probably discard their Terminals and
          Honours first) or the discard switch (#66) to capture tiles off the
          table. When I did it I started with eleven of the required tiles and
          was able to get both the others from my partner before my first turn.
          This gave me the mighty thirteen-sided wait so I had a good chance of
          drawing a winning tile myself and in fact I got one on my first draw
          so, in addition to acheiving the double Yakuman for the thirteen-sided
          wait Kokushi, I also got Chiihou (Earthly Win) for claiming a win on
          my first turn so I got a triple Yakuman overall. B)

56  Name: Ni no Tenhou (Heavenly Win on 2)

    Cost: 90 power points

    When: During shuffling

          You must be the current dealer (east)

          You must have a Konbi partner sat to your right

          (In Story Mode you'll often be partnered with Akko but she'll always
          be sat to your left so you'll be unable to use this cheat there. You
          can however use it in Single-Player mode where you can specify which
          of the three other players will be your partner.)

  Effect: You and your partner load your wall sections with a complete hand of
          four sets and a pair. The loaded tiles are placed in such positions
          that you'll collect them during the deal if the dice roll is a 2.
                            __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __|__ __
           Partner's wall: |__|__|__|__|__|##|##|__|__|__|__|__|__|##|##|__|__|
                           |__|__|__|__|__|##|##|__|__|__|__|__|__|##|##|__|__|
            loaded tiles -------------------'--'--------------------'--'|
                            __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __
                Your wall: |__|__|__|__|__|##|__|##|__|__|__|__|__|__|##|##|__|
                           |__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|##|##|__|
            loaded tiles -------------------'-----'--------------------'--'

          This dice roll determines that your partner's wall will be broken two
          tiles from the right. Since you're the current dealer you take the
          first four tiles, then the other three players take four each, then
          you take four and they take four each, then another four tiles each
          (drawing from your wall now) and then finally you take the first and
          fifth tiles (Chon-Chon) and the others take one each.

          With a complete hand from your initial fourteen tiles you qualify for
          the rare Yakuman (limit-hand) of Tenhou (Heavenly Win). You don't need
          to worry about giving your loaded hand any Yaku, just having the four
          sets and a pair is sufficient.

          This has a major advantage over Tsubame Gaeshi (#62) in that you don't
          need to blatantly lift massive blocks of tiles around on the table!
          However building the load can be harder with Tenhou loading (although
          this six-tile load is easier than the eight-tile one that follows) and
          you'll need to be able to rig the dice roll.

     How: The game will show your wall at the bottom of the top screen with the
          six vacant slots available for loading. Above that is an example of a
          loaded wall which you need to follow.

          Your partner will load two complete sets and one Taatsu (two-tile set
          element that needs one more tile to complete a set, e.g. _23_ or 8_8)
          so to make a complete hand of four sets and a pair you'll need to load
          one full set, one pair and one tile that will complete the Taatsu.

          Since it needs to match your partner's load, it's essential that you
          load the single tile shown in the example. For the set and pair though
          you can load anything so as usual I favour the dragon tiles as they're
          easier to identify.

          Now you just need to get a 2 on the dice roll. Watch the tumblers to
          get a feel for them and then start watching out for the six. Press the
          A button when you see the six and hopefully you should get a one. Do
          that twice and you're set! Sit back and watch as your beautiful Tenhou
          is delivered to you! :D

57  Name: Go no Tenhou (Heavenly Win on 5)

    Cost: 90 power points

    When: During shuffling

          You must be the current dealer (east)

          You must have a Konbi partner sat to your left

  Effect: This one works almost exactly like the previous cheat, the differences
          being that your partner must be sat to your left, you load eight tiles
          in your wall and it needs a 5 on the dice roll for it to work.
                            __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __
           Partner's wall: |__|__|##|__|##|__|__|__|__|__|__|##|##|__|__|__|__|
                           |__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|##|##|__|__|__|__|
            loaded tiles ----------'-----'--------------------'--'
                            __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __|__ __ __ __ __
                Your wall: |__|__|##|##|__|__|__|__|__|__|##|##|__|__|__|__|__|
                           |__|__|##|##|__|__|__|__|__|__|##|##|__|__|__|__|__|
            loaded tiles ----------'--'--------------------'--'|

          With a 5 on the dice your wall will be broken after the fifth tile
          from the right. You'll draw the four loaded tiles and your opponents
          will take the next twelve, then another four each, and another (from
          your partner's wall now), then you pick up the last two loaded tiles
          while the other players take one each.

     How: Again the game will show your wall at the bottom of the top screen
          with an example above it. You'll need to load two complete sets and
          one incomplete Taatsu (two-tile set element). It's important that you
          copy the Taatsu exactly because your partner will have loaded a tile
          that will complete the set; it seems the Taatsu is usually a 5 and 6
          in the Manzu (Craks) suit. The two loaded sets can be anything but I
          think it's easiest to spot Honours, just make sure there are three
          copies of each tile available before you start loading them.

          Then you just need to get a 5 on the dice (see Deal-Loading above).

= Switches =

The techniques in this category all involve swapping tiles on the table during
play, sometimes retrieving ones that were loaded during the wall-building phase.

58  Name: Bukko Nuki

    Cost: 50 power points

    When: During your turn or an opponent's turn

          Must have a section of wall directly in front of you

          Wall section must be at least ten tiles long

          Wall section cannot include active Dora indicators (?)

  Effect: Add two tiles from your hand to the right end of your wall section and
          take two from the left end. You can either take random tiles blindly
          from the wall in the hope that they will be better or you can collect
          one stack you secreted in your wall using Bukko Nuki loading (#54).
            __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __       __
           |__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__| <-- |__| tiles
           |__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|     |__| added
                    __       __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ 
             tiles |__| <-- |__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|
           removed |__|     |__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|

          If your wall section is the one from which tiles are currently being
          drawn it's also easy to time your Bukko Nuki to give one bad tile each
          to two of your opponents on their next draw. ;)

     How: When you select this cheat the game gives you a limited amount of time
          to tap on the two tiles to remove from your hand, then (when prompted)
          on the right end of your wall section and then on the left end.

59  Name: Haipai Bukko Nuki

    Cost: 40 power points

    When: On your "turn" during the initial deal

          Your wall section must be complete

          Your hand must have less than twelve tiles

  Effect: You take four tiles from the wall, drop them at the right end of your
          wall section and then pick up four tiles from the other end. Basically
          you're performing Bukko Nuki in the dealing phase so you can use this
          to collect tiles planted via Bukko Nuki loading (#54) during the deal
          before play commences.

     How: Slide from the end of the live wall to the right end of your hand then
          tap the left end of your hand. For both required actions you'll be
          given on-screen prompts as usual.

60  Name: San Hai Nuki (three-tile Nuki)

    Cost: 60 power points

    When: During your turn or an opponent's turn

          Must have a section of wall directly in front of you

          Wall section must be at least ten tiles long

          Wall section cannot include active Dora indicators (?)

  Effect: This works like Bukko Nuki (#58) but with a row of three tiles instead
          of a stack of two. You remove three tiles from the left end of the
          top row of your wall section, slide the remainder of the row across to
          the left and then plant three tiles at the right end.
                   __ __ __
            tiles |__|__|__|  __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __
          removed    __ __ __|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|
                    |__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|
                                                               __ __ __
                   __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __  |__|__|__| tiles
                  |__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__ __ __    added
                  |__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|

          This is like taking three extra turns simultaneously (you can discard
          three bad tiles you don't need and draw three new ones). Also, since
          you add an odd number of tiles to the wall, the player drawing even-
          numbered tiles from the upper layer of your wall will now be drawing
          ones that were previously odd-numbered (and vice versa).

     How: Tap the three tiles you want to remove from your hand and then touch
          the right and left ends of your wall when prompted.

61  Name: Fuuji Nuki

    Cost: 10 power points

    When: On your "turn" during the initial deal

          Your wall section must be complete

          Your hand must have less than twelve tiles

  Effect: Instead of taking two stacks (four tiles) from an opponent's wall, you
          take only one stack and - as you return it to your hand - you collect
          one further stack from the far left end of your own wall.

          The overall effect is that you draw four tiles (as you would normally
          during the deal) but two of them are from your own wall section and
          could be ones which you planted there using Bukko Nuki loading (#54).

     How: Press the X button to open the cheat menu *immediately* before taking
          your next set of four tiles. The game will then prompt you to perform
          a three-part slide, from the end of the live wall, to the left end of
          your wall and finally to your hand at the bottom of the screen.

62  Name: Tsubame Gaeshi

    Cost: 100 power points

    When: Immediately following the initial deal at the start of a hand

          Your entire wall section of 34 tiles must be intact

  Effect: If you're a manga/anime fan you should be no stranger to this infamous
          cheating technique, especially if you've watched the Legendary Gambler
          Tetsuya anime! (check halfway through episode 3 for example)

          During Tsubame Gaeshi loading (#55) you plant a full hand of tiles in
          the bottom row of your wall section (14 tiles if you're currently the
          dealer or 13 tiles otherwise). In order to be able to use this cheat
          technique your loaded wall must remain intact after the initial deal.

          Your hand is placed face-down on the tabletop, then you lift your wall
          section *leaving* the 13/14 planted tiles on the table. You lower the
          wall tiles onto your hand creating a new 2x17 wall which you lift and
          place with the other wall sections. You then take the planted tiles.
                     __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __
                    |__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|
                   __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __  |__|__|__|__|
                  |__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|

          I guess you could use Tsubame Gaeshi without loading if you draw a bad
          starting hand, but it's much more effective with loaded tiles.

     How: Make sure you press X *immediately* after the fourth player has taken
          their fourth and final draw in the initial deal. This will be a single
          tile taken by north so just spam X when you see north reach for their
          thirteenth tile.

          You'll need to perform three slides on the touchscreen when prompted:
          a long one from left to right along your wall, one from the wall to
          your hand and finally one back from the hand tiles to the wall.

  Trivia: Tsubame Gaeshi or "swallow reversal" was the name of a sword-fighting
          technique used by the legendary 16th-century Japanese swordsman Sasaki
          Kojirou. It's also the name of a counter-throw used in Judo.

          More confusingly, Tsubame Gaeshi is also the name of an optional Yaku
          (scoring element) in Japanese mahjong awarded for declaring a Ron win
          on the tile discarded by an opponent upon declaring Riichi.

63  Name: Nigirikomi (double draw)

    Cost: 60 power points

    When: When drawing your next tile from the wall

  Effect: Instead of drawing a single tile from the wall you take two tiles and
          deposit a tile from your hand. You follow this by discarding as normal
          so in effect you're taking two draws and making two discards.

     How: Tap the tile you want to discard then, when prompted, slide it from
          your hand to the end of the live wall.

64  Name: Tsumo Surikae (draw switch)

    Cost: 40 power points

    When: When drawing your next tile from the wall

  Effect: Normally you would draw the first tile from the end of the live wall
          but instead you take the one next to it and then slide the first tile
          across so it looks like you took the correct one.
                               _ __ __ __                          _ __ __
                 Normal draw:  _|__|__|__|  ____________________\  _|__|__|__
                               _|__|__|__|                      /  _|__|__|__|
                               _ __ __ __        _ __    __        _ __ __
          Tsumo Surikae draw:  _|__|__|__|  __\  _|__|__|__|  __\  _|__|__|__
                               _|__|__|__|    /  _|__|__|__|    /  _|__|__|__|

          If you've loaded the odd-numbered tiles in your wall but find yourself
          drawing even-numbered ones you could use this to collect your loads
          one tile at a time.

     How: To use this cheat you simply have to touch the tile at the wall end.

65  Name: Yama Surikae (wall switch)

    Cost: 20 power points

    When: When drawing your next tile from the wall

          Must have a section of wall directly in front of you

  Effect: You draw your next tile from the live end of the wall as normal but
          then switch it for one from your wall section.

          If you've loaded tiles into the wall or read them, you can use this to
          get the one you want. I don't think there's any point using this if
          you don't know what tiles are in your wall.

     How: Tap the first tile at the end of the live wall when prompted and slide
          from there to the wall tile you want to swap it with.

66  Name: Kawa Surikae (discard switch)

    Cost: 90 power points

    When: When drawing your next tile from the wall

  Effect: After picking your tile from the live wall you swap it for one of the
          previously discarded tiles already on the table and then deliver it to
          your hand at the bottom of the screen.

          If your hand is Tenpai (ready) you can use this to give yourself the
          tile you need to complete your hand; if the hand is closed you'll be
          awarded Menzen Tsumo (Concealed Self-Draw) too. If you declare Riichi
          you can use this on your next turn to get the bonus Yaku (scoring
          element) of Ippatsu ("one-shot" win) as well.

          This can also be handy if you're stuck in "Iishanten Hell" - one away
          from Tenpai. You can pick up a tile you need to make your hand ready
          and then declare Riichi (if the hand is closed).

     How: Ignore the confusing horizontal arrow on the screen, you need to touch
          your stylus on the end of the live wall and then perform a "sliding"
          motion directly from there to the discarded tile you want to steal.

          It seems you're significantly more likely to succeed if the discard
          tile you're attempting to steal is close to the end of the live wall
          or anywhere you can take it without deviating too much from the usual
          route from the wall to your hand.

67  Name: Yama Zurashi (wall slide)

    Cost: 20 power points

    When: During your turn or an opponent's turn

          Must have a section of wall directly in front of you

          Top row of wall section must contain at least three tiles

  Effect: This works a little differently to its animation in the "underground
          mahjong classroom" tutorial - it only has two steps rather than three.

          First you slide the top row of your wall section one space to the left
          so there's one tile overhanging at the left end and a gap at the right
          end. Then you move the loose tile to fill that gap like this...
                           __  __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __
                      .-- |__||__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__ <--.
                      |       |__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|__|   |
                      '--------------------------------------------'

          If you've used Genroku Zumi (#1-26) to load the odd-numbered positions
          in the top layer of your wall but you're drawing even-numbered tiles
          you can use this tech to shift the loaded tiles into even positions.

     How: To perform this cheat you need to perform two slides when prompted on
          the touchscreen, both times sliding from marker 1 to marker 2. The
          first is a short slide at the right (one space left) and the second is
          a long slide from the bottom-left end of the wall to the top-right.

68  Name: Dora Kaeshi (Dora exchange)

    Cost: 80 power points

    When: Immediately following the initial deal at the start of a hand

          Dora indicator tile must be in your wall section

  Effect: You swap a tile from your hand with the upper tile in the third stack
          of the dead wall so it becomes the new Dora indicator.

          This could be useful if for example you find yourself holding 1222 in
          the same suit after the deal. You can make 1 the Dora indicator which
          makes 2 the Dora - and you have a complete set of three of them! :D

          It's less useful if you have only two consecutive tiles. Say you have
          45 in the same suit. You can swap the 4 into the wall making 5 the
          Dora but you'll lose the handy _45_ Taatsu (set element) you had.

          It works well if you have a pair of dragons and one of the preceding
          dragon in the red-white-green-red sequence, for example if you have a
          pair of Chun (red) and swap in a Hatsu (green) as the Dora indicator.
          You should be able to easily Pon the third red dragon to give you Yaku
          (scoring element) and a total of four Han (doubles).

     How: To use this cheat you must press X immediately after the final tile is
          taken in the initial deal, just before the Dora indicator is flipped -
          as with Tsubame Gaeshi, just spam X when you see north reach for their
          thirteenth tile. Then tap the tile in your hand that you want to plant
          as the Dora indicator and perform a sliding motion from it to the dead
          wall when prompted.

= Stashing =

This section is labelled Tsuri which means "hanging" but I've decided to rename
it because the techniques here involve drawing extra tiles, holding them in what
I'm calling your "stash" and then either swapping or discarding them.

69  Name: San Hai Tsumo (three-tile draw)

    Cost: 80 power points

    When: When drawing your next tile from the wall

          There must be at least four tiles in that section of the wall

  Effect: Instead of taking one tile from the wall you take three. (Greedy!)

          Although the wall will be slightly shorter than it should be, the end
          will have the same appearance as if you'd taken a single tile.
                                                                 __
                               _ __ __ __ __        _ __ __ __  |__|
                 Normal draw:  _|__|__|__|__|  __\  _|__|__|__|__
                               _|__|__|__|__|    /  _|__|__|__|__|
                                                              __ __
                               _ __ __ __ __        _ __ __  |__|__|
          San Hai Tsumo draw:  _|__|__|__|__|  __\  _|__|__|__  |__|
                               _|__|__|__|__|    /  _|__|__|__|

          One of your drawn tiles will appear at the right end of your hand of
          tiles as usual but the other two will be stashed in a little grey box
          in the bottom-right corner of the top screen. This stash represents a
          secret place to hide the extra tiles in your lap or under the table.

          You will continue to draw tiles from the wall as normal on subsequent
          turns. If you want to use one from your stash you'll need to use the
          elevator technique described below (#70).

          You can only ever hold two tiles in your stash so if you want to take
          another two you'll need to use Modoshi Tsumo (#71) to return your two
          stashed tiles to the wall.

          Any tiles in your special hiding place will be lost at the end of the
          current hand of play; they are not retained for the following hand.

     How: To execute this cheat you are required to tap the successive prompts
          that appear on the three tiles at the end of the live wall.

70  Name: Erebeetaa (elevator)

    Cost: 70 power points

    When: During your turn or an opponent's turn

          Requires a stash of tiles from using the three-tile draw (#69)

  Effect: The elevator allows you to swap one of the two extra tiles you took in
          a three-tile draw with one in your hand.

     How: When you select this cheat the two tiles in your stash will be shown
          in a box in the centre of the touchscreen. Tap the one you want to use
          and then use a continuous sliding motion from there to indicate the
          tile in your hand that you want to switch out. The new tile will be
          added to your hand and the one you removed will be sent to the stash
          (which then returns to its usual position on the top screen).

71  Name: Modoshi Tsumo (returning draw)

    Cost: 70 power points

    When: When drawing your next tile from the wall

          Requires a stash of tiles from using the three-tile draw (#69)

          The current live wall section must have at least three tiles

  Effect: You can use this technique to dump the two stashed tiles back into the
          wall (so that you can perform another three-tile draw later).

     How: The two tiles in the stash will be shown in the centre of the lower
          screen. You'll be prompted to perform two slides on the touchscreen to
          drag each of them in turn into the end of the live wall. In practice
          this will be accomplished as a single motion in which you dump the two
          tiles at the same time as drawing a new tile from the wall.

= Reading =

This category is labelled Toushi - a word usually denoting an x-ray examination
or clairvoyance but in this context it refers to the player's ability to "read"
the engravings on a tile by touch (or to recognise subtle markings on the back).

72  Name: Ni Mou Pai (second tile read)

    Cost: 10 power points

    When: When drawing your next tile from the wall

          Must have a section of wall directly in front of you

          Must be drawing from the top row of the wall

          Top row of wall must have at least two tiles

  Effect: Before drawing your tile from the live wall you will "thumb-read" the
          tile next to it. The result of the reading will be shown briefly in a
          box in the bottom-left corner of the top screen.

     How: Simply tap the second tile on the wall when prompted.

73  Name: Haji Mou Pai (wall read)

    Cost: 30 power points

    When: During your turn or an opponent's turn

          Must have a section of wall directly in front of you

  Effect: You somehow (?) discretely read all the tiles in the upper row of your
          wall section. The tiles are displayed for only a couple of seconds so
          I hope you have a good visual memory!

          Once you know which tiles are present you can then use other cheats to
          acquire the ones you want. You can use Yama Surikae (#65) to steal a
          tile straight out of the wall when making a draw or you could use the
          Yama Zurashi technique (#67) to change the turn order so that you will
          draw the tile/s you want on your subsequent turns. A tile at the left
          end of the wall could be harvested with Bukko Nuki (#58).

     How: Two touchscreen slides are required - follow the prompts to slide once
          from left to right and then another from the wall to your hand.

74  Name: Ganpai (gun tiles)

    Cost: 100 power points

    When: During your turn or an opponent's turn

  Effect: When you use this cheat you effectively study all the tiles on the
          table and commit to memory any miniscule features by which you might
          be able to recognise them, like specks of dirt or fingerprints. (?!)

          This cheat has no effect in the current hand, but after the next hand
          commences you can tap any tile in your opponents' hands or in the top
          row of the wall and its identity will be revealed in the box in the
          bottom-left corner of the top screen. Handy!

          You can keep using it too - for the rest of the match!

          From their hand composition you can determine an opponent's waits, or
          you might want to check which tiles you're going to draw next from the
          wall, or what Kan Dora indicator would be revealed on the next Kong.

          Sometimes when an opponent reaches and you study their hand you might
          find that they're waiting on a tile which you need to discard in order
          to complete your hand. In this case you can use Nigirikomi (#63) to
          get rid of it safely.

     How: To execute this cheat you need to perform one continuous slide around
          the four sides of the table. Wait for the on-screen prompts to appear
          in the corners and then, without lifting the stylus, tap 1 and slide
          to 2, then to 3, then to 4 and finally back to 1 again.

          Don't worry if your slides are a little wobbly, just make sure that
          you hit all the markers.

          From the next hand of play onwards (when it's your turn) just tap any
          tiles you want to identify!

= Co-Op =

The very last two techniques are listed under "Konbi" (short for the Japanese
rendering of the English word "combination"). These are ones you can use when
working in partnership with another player - indicated with orange text.

75  Name: Tooshi (communication)

    Cost: 30 power points

    When: During your turn or an opponent's turn

          You must have a Konbi partner

  Effect: This cheat allows you to collude with your Konbi partner sat (usually)
          to your left. You tell them which tiles you need and, if they've got
          any, they will discard them so you can call them by Chii or Pon. They
          will even provide one that you can take to declare a Ron win.

          (In Single-Player (non-story) mode you could have your partner sitting
          either to your right or opposite you. In this case you would only be
          able to call tiles by Pon (or Kan) since you can only call Chii from
          your Kamicha - the player seated to your left.)

          Since you take tiles by calling, your hand will become open and you
          deny yourself the benefits of Riichi and possible Pinfu, Menzen Tsumo
          (Concealed Self-Draw) and other good stuff. You must also ensure that
          your hand has Yaku, probably Tanyao (All Simples).

          This can be quite useful however when making a hand that would usually
          be open anyway, like Toi-Toi (All Pungs) or Chinitsu (Full Flush).

          I like to use this immediately after reaching and request my winning
          tile/s. If they have any your partner will discard one on their next
          turn and you get Ippatsu ("one-shot" win).

     How: When you activate this cheat the game will give a menu display which
          shows all 34 different tiles. You can pick up to four of these (within
          a time-limit) and then tap the orange button to confirm. If you select
          the wrong tile just tap it again to deselect it and then continue.

          (In a real game this might be accomplished by using hand signals or
          code-words to give your partner a secret message.)

76  Name: Okurikomi (feeding)

    Cost: 80 power points

    When: During your turn or an opponent's turn

          You must have a Konbi partner (can be left, right or opposite)

  Effect: This works somewhat like the communication cheat above but instead of
          discarding a tile you need your partner will pass it to you discretely
          under the table.

          Since having a "short" hand (with too few tiles) is a foul punishable
          by Chombo, it's necessary to exchange tiles, so you must give one to
          your partner each time they give one to you.

          You can even use this after your partner has reached! A player would
          be fined for changing their hand structure after declaring Riichi and
          in an exhaustive draw any players who reached are required to reveal
          their Tenpai (ready) hand so I guess they'd pay Chombo here.

     How: The game will show your hand at the top of the touchscreen and your
          partner's at the bottom. Pick one tile from each and then, to perform
          the swap, do a three-part slide on the touchscreen when promoted.

          As usual there's a time-limit so before you launch the cheat think
          about which tile you want to lose and which ones you'd like to get -
          make a mental "shopping list". :)

          If you want Honours or Terminals then make your request early before
          your partner starts discarding them.

= Exposing Cheats =

If you see one of your opponents cheating - and it's usually pretty obvious when
they make a move out of turn and do something suspicious - you can catch them in
the act by tapping their hand on the touchscreen. Not their "hand" of tiles, but
their actual hand of fingers. :) The game applies the usual mahjong manga "rule"
that says if it goes undetected then it's not cheating!

If you want to catch cheaters (you might not - see below) then it helps to be
ready for them. If you hold your DS with both hands then hold your thumbs over
the touchscreen, or if you have it supported on your lap or a table then hover
over the screen with your finger or stylus. If you find that you're not quick
enough try changing the game speed on the options menu (see Section 11).

Only the celebrities cheat so you don't need to watch the townies. Also several
cheating techniques involve manipulating your own wall so an opponent is more
likely to cheat when they have a wall section directly in front of them.

The exposed cheater must pay the standard Chombo penalty which is paid like a
Mangan limit in reverse, so for a dealer it's 12,000 pts (4000 to each player)
and for a non-dealer it's 8,000 pts (4000 to the dealer and 2000 each to the
other two), and the current hand of play is declared a draw and replayed without
the seat-winds rotating (so the current dealer "stays on").

False accusations are punishable by Chombo too so don't get too "trigger-happy"
on the touchscreen or you'll be the one paying out big points!

It's very satisfying to catch a cheat but you shouldn't always do it. The Chombo
penalty is pretty substantial and could bust the cheating player which would end
the match if you're playing with the Dobon bankruptcy rule (see Section 12). If
you weren't leading on points this would mean you'd missed the opportunity to
steal 1st place and win the match.

Also remember that the Chombo payments for a non-dealer foul are asymmetrical -
the dealer gets an extra 2000 points! This will sometimes have a significant
effect on the scores. A series of Chombo penalties by a non-dealer will give the
dealer a lot of points - if that's not you, that's a bad thing!

Here's an example of when not to expose a cheat. Say you have a 1000-point lead
over Player A who is currently east. Player B is a serial cheat and, having been
exposed a couple of times, is down to their last 5000 points. If Player B cheats
again and you catch them they'd have to pay 8000 points in Chombo, bankrupting
them and ending the game. You'd receive 2000 points but Player A would get 4000
points putting them in 1st place. If you were playing in Story Mode needing to
win the match to continue you'd have to try again.

If you find yourself with a useless hand of unconnected tiles then forcing a
draw by catching a cheat is a nice way to start afresh. Conversely you should
resist the urge to catch them when you have a more promising hand.

If you're in first place with a small lead, you use a cheat and get caught then
you pay Chombo and lose that lead. On the other hand, if you have a substantial
lead then you're in a more comfortable position to take that risk.

Here are a few key points to keep on mind:-

o if the cheater is dealer and has fewer than 12,000 pts, Chombo will bust them

o if they're a non-dealer and have fewer than 8,000 pts, Chombo will bust them

o if you're dealer and you catch a cheat, you get more points

o if the exposed cheater is dealer, all three players get equal points

o if neither you or the cheater is dealer, an opponent will get extra points

o if you falsely accuse a player of cheating, you pay the fine!

o don't throw away a good hand

o remember they can catch you cheating too

One final note, if an opponent says something (other than normal declarations or
calls) it usually means they've just cheated and gotten away with it!

------< STORY MODE >---------------------------------------------- [Section 07]

You can access the game's Story Mode from the top-left option on the main menu.

Yes, the one that clearly says "STORY" in English capital letters. You got it!

When you launch this you'll get a few pages of text on the top screen followed
by some images of various interiors. I don't think you can skip these - you just
have to wait for the slideshow to finish.

Story Mode has a couple of menus of its own. One is the "neighbourhood map" with
the Hori mahjong parlour in the centre and seven other locations surrounding it.
At first only the parlour will be available - the other places will be marked
"Close" (i.e. closed) but they will unlock as you progress through the game.

              .-------------------------------------------------.
              |  __________  .-------------------.  __________  |
              | |          | | Neighbourhood Map | |          | |
              | |   Maid   | '-------------------' | Oshaberi | |
              | | Teahouse |         _________     |Restaurant| |
              | |__________|        |         |    |__________| |
              |   ____________      | H O R I |     __________  |
              |  |            |     |         |    |          | |
              |  | Speedwagon |     | Mahjong |    | Pachinko | |
              |  |   Garage   |     | Parlour |    |  Parlour | |
              |  |____________|     |_________|    |__________| |
              |  ___________        ____________   __________   |
              | |           |      |            | |          |  |
              | |  Alcohol  |      |  "Muscle"  | | American |  |
              | |   Store   |      | Sport-Shop | | Boutique |  |
              | |___________|      |____________| |__________|  |
              '-------------------------------------------------'

The other simple menu can be accessed by pressing the Start button from the map
view. This gives the following four options...

     .-------------------.
     |      Status       | - view your level and available cheat techniques
     '-------------------'
     .-------------------.
     |     Quit Game     | - exit Story Mode (pick left option to confirm)
     '-------------------'
     .-------------------.
     |      Options      | - access the usual options menu (see Section 11)
     '-------------------'
     .-------------------.
     |   Return to Map   | - return to the, um, map
     '-------------------'

Before I continue (or forget) I should explain the screen you get each time you 
re-enter Story Mode to resume play. You'll be given two choices...

1. Continue play (top box, blue and white)

   The second line of text will show the chapter number (specifically this will
   be the second character on the row) and the next venue.

   The third and fourth lines (in the white section) show how many cheating
   abilities you've learnt and your cheating level. When you first start you'll
   have no cheats available and your level will be 1.

2. Restart story (bottom box, white only)

   With this option you can go back to the first chapter of the story but you
   retain any cheating techniques you've previously learnt. (I think)

The basic format for Story Mode is that you pick a venue from the map and play a
match there, usually against Akko and two other celebrities or Akko, one celeb
and one random "townie" character (see Section 08). If you're playing in "Konbi"
partnership with Akko (indicated by orange Japanese text - see illustration in
Section 08) she will cheat in cooperation with you but not otherwise, the other
celebrities will often cheat and the townie will never cheat.

Your objective in each game is always to win the match. If you're successful you
will learn a new cheating technique (indicated by eight tiles appearing on the
top screen) and a new venue in the town will unlock. At each venue you will play
against different celebs and the game will be preceded by some conversation -
when you're offered two options pick the top one to start the game or the bottom
one to return to the map menu. Although you can play again at an old venue, in
order to progress through the game and earn unlocks you should always play at
the new locations as and when they become available.

It may vary each time, but my play-through proceeded as follows. Where Akko is
marked with an asterisk (*) this indicates that she is available to assist with
any Konbi partner cheating techniques. The final column shows the reference
number/s of the cheat/s that unlocked with each match (see Section 06).

     |               Opponents                 |      Location      | Cheats
  ---+-----------------------------------------+--------------------+--------
   1 | townie, Kazuki Ootake, Masakazu Mimura  |  mahjong parlour   | 54, 58
  ---+-----------------------------------------+--------------------+--------
   2 | Akko*, Sayaka Tashiro, townie           |      teahouse      | 65
  ---+-----------------------------------------+--------------------+--------
   3 | Akko*, Yukio Iketani, townie            |     sport-shop     | 64
  ---+-----------------------------------------+--------------------+--------
   4 | Akko*, Miyuki Imori, Ikue Sakakibara    |     restaurant     | 67, 75
  ---+-----------------------------------------+--------------------+--------
   5 | Akko*, Yuu Abiru, townie                |      boutique      | 66
  ---+-----------------------------------------+--------------------+--------
   6 | Akko*, Shirou Tsubuyaki, townie         |   alcohol store    | 68
  ---+-----------------------------------------+--------------------+--------
   7 | Akko*, Hori, townie                     |  pachinko parlour  | 69, 70
  ---+-----------------------------------------+--------------------+--------
   8 | Akko*, Jun Itoda, Kazuhiro Ozawa        |       garage       | 72, 73

After winning a match at all eight locations the story enters the second phase
and takes an odd turn. Each of the venues transforms into a psychedelic bizarro
version. Each of the celebrities changes too and will have either blue or dark
pink skin and red eyes. Instead of playing with Akko and random townies you now
mostly play with two strange men wearing wrestler masks, one with a hat and the
other with a very funny squeaky voice. You will now be promoted to Level 2.

Oh, and all the locations apart from the mahjong parlour will become locked
again so you have to go around unlocking them again! As before, you accomplish
this by winning matches in each new place as it becomes available. The alcohol
store (bottom-left on the map) will unlock and lock a couple of times but don't
worry - just pick any new location offered or go back to the mahjong parlour.

     |               Opponents                 |      Location      | Cheats
  ---+-----------------------------------------+--------------------+--------
   9 | townie, Kazuki Ootake, Masakazu Mimura  |  mahjong parlour   | -
  ---+-----------------------------------------+--------------------+--------
  10 | two masked men, Sayaka Tashiro          |      teahouse      | 1
  ---+-----------------------------------------+--------------------+--------
  11 | two masked men, Sayaka Tashiro          |      teahouse      | 55, 62
  ---+-----------------------------------------+--------------------+--------
  12 | two masked men, Yuu Abiru               |      boutique      | 61, 59
  ---+-----------------------------------------+--------------------+--------
  13 | two masked men, Hori                    |  pachinko parlour  | 71
  ---+-----------------------------------------+--------------------+--------
  14 | one masked man, Akko, Shirou Tsubuyaki  |    alcohol store   | -
  ---+-----------------------------------------+--------------------+--------
  15 | one MM, Kazuki Ootake, Masakazu Mimura  |  mahjong parlour   | 57
  ---+-----------------------------------------+--------------------+--------
  16 | Akko*, Shirou Tsubuyaki, Mecha-Akko (!) |   alcohol store    | 56
  ---+-----------------------------------------+--------------------+--------
  17 | Akko*, Jun Itoda, Kazuhiro Ozawa        |       garage       | 74
  ---+-----------------------------------------+--------------------+--------
  18 | Akko*, one masked man, Yukio Iketani    |     sport-shop     | 63
  ---+-----------------------------------------+--------------------+--------
  19 | Akko*, Miyuki Imori, Ikue Sakakibara    |     restaurant     | 76, 60

After that is some sort of final showdown where you play four consecutive games.
In the fourth of these you play "au naturel" with all cheats disabled.

     |               Opponents                 |      Location      | Cheats
  ---+-----------------------------------------+--------------------+--------
  20 | Akko*, Shirou Tsubuyaki, Mecha-Akko     |   alcohol store    | 27
  ---+-----------------------------------------+--------------------+--------
  21 | Akko*, Shirou Tsubuyaki, Mecha-Akko Z   |   alcohol store    | -
  ---+-----------------------------------------+--------------------+--------
  22 | Shirou Tsubuyaki, Akko, Masakazu Mimura |  mahjong parlour   | -
  ---+-----------------------------------------+--------------------+--------
  24 | Kazuki Ootake, Akko, Shirou Tsubuyaki   |  mahjong parlour   | -

After winning that last match you'll get a parting comment from each of the
Horipro celebrities in turn and then the end credits roll - you've beaten the
game! :D Your "clear" status is saved to your profile.

You are now at Level 3 and you've unlocked all twenty-five cheating techniques,
although you can only use Genroku (draw-loading) and Bakudan (deal-loading) for
Yakuhai - there are still another 51 variations to learn for other Yaku loads!

All locations in the town are available and you play there against the normal
characters from the first phase of the Story Mode. Rather than starting from
zero as usual, you now start every match with a full cheat bar. :)

Sometimes when you win a match you'll unlock another cheat (and advance another
level) but not always. I'm not sure how that works but it makes for a slow grind
and that's why this guide is a little light on information about the majority of
the draw-loading and deal-loading techniques!

*In this match Akko is your partner and can assist with co-op cheats.

------< SINGLE-PLAYER >------------------------------------------- [Section 08]

The Single-Player mode can be started by selecting the middle option on the top
row of the main menu (the round one). In this mode you can play one-off games
against your choice of opponents and with your own rule preferences (including
the option to disable cheating).                         
  _____    _____    _____
 |     |  |     |  |     |   The first thing to do is to pick        Toimen    S
 |     |  |     |  |     |   three players to play against from  K .---------. h
 |     |  |     |  |     |   the eighteen initially available.   a |         | i
 |_____|  |_____|  |_____|                                       m |         | m
                             The roster of opponents is shown    i |         | o
 Kamicha   Toimen  Shimocha  on the touchscreen and you select   c |         | c
                             them either using the d-pad and A   h '---------' h
button or by tapping them. They'll be added to the three frames  a     You     a
on the upper screen which correspond to the seating positions
illustrated here. Beneath each selected character is their name and two ratings
showing their Mahjong Power (top) and Cheating Power (bottom) from 1 to 5 stars.
You can pick the same person two or three times if you like, and if you want to
remove a previous selection you can use the B button like a backspace.
  ____          _
 |__  | /\  _  | |_"  If you use the X button to select a character instead of A
  __| | \/_/ | | __|  (or if you press X after picking the third player) you'll
 |____|  |__/  '___|  notice that three orange symbols appear in front of them.
                      These are Japanese katakana characters that spell "Konbi"
   KO  -  N  -  BI    which is a shortened form of the Japanese rendering of the
                      English word "combination" and this indicates that this
player will be available to help you via a range of co-op cheating techniques
(see Section 06). You can only have one Konbi partner per match and it's most
common to have them seated to your left (so you can call Chii on their discards)
but there is one cheat tech that requires that they be seated to your right.

= Characters =

Initially you have a roster of eighteen characters available. The first twelve
shown are the celebrities from the Horipro agency. Use the shoulder buttons L/R
to page and you'll see the other six unnamed characters who I like to refer to
as the "townies". If you have a better name for them please let me know. :)

             .---. .---. .---. .---.         .---. .---. .---. .---.
             | A | | B | | C | | D |         | M | | N | | O | | P |
             '---' '---' '---' '---'         '---' '---' '---' '---'
             .---. .---. .---. .---.         .---. .---.
             | E | | F | | G | | H |         | Q | | R |
             '---' '---' '---' '---'         '---' '---'
             .---. .---. .---. .---.
             | I | | J | | K | | L |
             '---' '---' '---' '---'

The grid below summarises the information about the initial characters:-

  | Name              | Role                    | Mahjong Power | Cheating Power
--+-------------------+-------------------------+---------------+---------------
A | Akiko "Akko" Wada | Singer                  |     #####     |        #
--+-------------------+-------------------------+---------------+---------------
B | Masakazu Mimura*  | Comedian / actor        |         #     |      ###
--+-------------------+-------------------------+---------------+---------------
C | Kazuki Ootake*    | Comedian                |        ##     |      ###
--+-------------------+-------------------------+---------------+---------------
D | Ikue Sakakibara   | Singer / actress        |        ##     |      ###
--+-------------------+-------------------------+---------------+---------------
E | Miyuki Imori      | Singer / actress        |         #     |      ###
--+-------------------+-------------------------+---------------+---------------
F | Shirou Tsubuyaki  | Comedian                |       ###     |     ####
--+-------------------+-------------------------+---------------+---------------
G | Sayaka Tashiro    | Idol                    |        ##     |       ##
--+-------------------+-------------------------+---------------+---------------
H | Yuu Abiru         | Idol                    |         #     |     ####
--+-------------------+-------------------------+---------------+---------------
I | Jun Itoda**       | Comedian                |      ####     |       ##
--+-------------------+-------------------------+---------------+---------------
J | Kazuhiro Ozawa**  | Comedian                |         #     |       ##
--+-------------------+-------------------------+---------------+---------------
K | Yukio Iketani     | Olympic gymnast / actor |         #     |       ##
--+-------------------+-------------------------+---------------+---------------
L | Hori              | Impressionist           |         #     |       ##
--+-------------------'-------------------------+---------------+---------------
M | Yaoya (greengrocer)                         |      ####     |        #
--+---------------------------------------------+---------------+---------------
N | Sushiya (sushi restaurant)                  |       ###     |        #
--+---------------------------------------------+---------------+---------------
O | Hanaya (florist)                            |      ####     |        #
--+---------------------------------------------+---------------+---------------
P | Tabakoya (tobacconist)                      |        ##     |        #
--+---------------------------------------------+---------------+---------------
Q | Kissaten (coffee-shop)                      |      ####     |        #
--+---------------------------------------------+---------------+---------------
R | Furiitaa*** (under-employed young person)   |         #     |        #

As you progress through Story Mode you will unlock further characters that will
become available here. There are bizarro versions of eleven celebrities (that's
everyone except Akko), the two mysterious masked men and the two robot versions
of Akko. (heh)

You will now have five pages of characters available: celebrities (12), bizarro
celebrities (11), townies (6), masked men (2) and robots (2).

Here's a breakdown of the extra characters that are added:-

          .---. .---. .---. .---.       .---. .---.       .---. .---.
          | b | | c | | d | | e |       | S | | T |       | U | | V |
          '---' '---' '---' '---'       '---' '---'       '---' '---'
          .---. .---. .---. .---.
          | f | | g | | h | | i |
          '---' '---' '---' '---'
          .---. .---. .---.
          | j | | k | | l |
          '---' '---' '---'

  | Name              | Role                    | Mahjong Power | Cheating Power
--+-------------------+-------------------------+---------------+---------------
b | Masakazu Mimura*  | Comedian / actor        |     #####     |    #####
--+-------------------+-------------------------+---------------+---------------
c | Kazuki Ootake*    | Comedian                |     #####     |    #####
--+-------------------+-------------------------+---------------+---------------
d | Ikue Sakakibara   | Singer / actress        |     #####     |     ####
--+-------------------+-------------------------+---------------+---------------
e | Miyuki Imori      | Singer / actress        |     #####     |     ####
--+-------------------+-------------------------+---------------+---------------
f | Shirou Tsubuyaki  | Comedian                |     #####     |    #####
--+-------------------+-------------------------+---------------+---------------
g | Sayaka Tashiro    | Idol                    |        ##     |    #####
--+-------------------+-------------------------+---------------+---------------
h | Yuu Abiru         | Idol                    |       ###     |     ####
--+-------------------+-------------------------+---------------+---------------
i | Jun Itoda**       | Comedian                |      ####     |       ##
--+-------------------+-------------------------+---------------+---------------
j | Kazuhiro Ozawa**  | Comedian                |       ###     |       ##
--+-------------------+-------------------------+---------------+---------------
k | Yukio Iketani     | Olympic gymnast / actor |      ####     |      ###
--+-------------------+-------------------------+---------------+---------------
l | Hori              | Impressionist           |       ###     |       ##
--+-------------------'-------------------------+---------------+---------------
S | Masked Man #1 (fighter/squeaky)             |      ####     |        #
--+---------------------------------------------+---------------+---------------
T | Masked Man #2 (manager/hat)                 |     #####     |        #
--+---------------------------------------------+---------------+---------------
U | Mecha-Akko                                  |     #####     |    #####
--+---------------------------------------------+---------------+---------------
V | Mecha-Akko Z                                |     #####     |        #

After selecting your three opponents you press A again to confirm.

Next you have the choice of adjusting the rule options (see Section 12). You can
use the d-pad to navigate up/down and to adjust settings (left/right) or Select
to restore the defaults. The final option is for cheating; by default this is
set On (but you can only use cheat techs you've unlocked in Story Mode). Press A
to confirm your choices then pick the left option (yes) to confirm again.

The game will then commence and play will proceed as normal (see Section 05).

At the end of each match the game will ask if you want to end play. Answering
"no" (right option) will prompt another question - do you want the character
selection menu? Pick "no" (right) again and you can play another match against
the same characters. If you answer "yes" (left option) to the first question you
will be returned to the menu.

*Masakazu Mimura and Kazuki Ootake together are a double-act called Summers.

**Jun Itoda and Kazuhiro Ozawa together are a double-act called Speedwagon (this
is also the name of the garage where you find them in Story Mode).

***In Japanese culture a "freeter" is a person aged between 15 and 34 who is
working in a part-time or a low-paid job, or is unemployed, but is not a student
or a housewife. The word freeter is thought to be a portmanteau of the English
loanword "free" (or "freelance") and the German loanword "Arbeiter" (worker).

------< MULTI-PLAYER >-------------------------------------------- [Section 09]

Akko de Pon supports both Download Play and local Wireless Play for two, three
or four players. These can be accessed from the top-right (square) option on the
game's main menu. This gives the following two options...

                             .-------------------.
                             |   Wireless Play   |
                             '-------------------'
                             .-------------------.
                             |   Download Play   |
                             '-------------------'

After picking either you then need to select the left option (yes) to confirm.

I'm afraid I can't give much more info as I haven't tried these functions, but I
assume they work the "normal" way like any English-language DS game.

The screenshots in the manual show that you can set the usual eight rule options
(actually seven rule options and cheating on/off) as explained in Section 12.

------< STATS >--------------------------------------------------- [Section 10]

The bottom-left button off the main menu lets you view statistical data based
upon your performance. The data is spread over six pages which you can page
through using the shoulder buttons L and R.

Although there's no demarcation, the stats are divided into three sections. The
first block gives conventional gameplay statistics, the second counts the number
of times you've achieved each Yaku (scoring element) and Yakuman (limit-hand)
and the third gives info on your use of the cheat techs.

o Page 1

  1.01 Number of matches played

  1.02 Number of matches won 

  1.03 1st place (top) rate

  1.04 2nd place rate

  1.05 3rd place rate

  1.06 4th place rate

  1.07 Average placing

       This is an arithmetic mean of your game placings, given to two decimal
       places. (so, for example, if you'd played only four games and came 1st,
       2nd, 3rd and 4th then your average position would be (1+2+3+4)/4 = 2.50)

  1.08 Average final score

  1.09 Highest final score

  1.10 Hand win rate

  1.11 Closed hand win rate

       This is the percentage of your won hands that had no exposed sets made
       using tiles stolen from your opponents by Chii/Pon/Kan.

  1.12 Open hand win rate

  1.13 Payment rate

       This shows the percentage of hands in which you dealt into an opponent's
       win, discarding the tile which they took to declare a Ron win.

  1.14 Tenpai draw rate

       This indicates how often you have a Tenpai (ready) hand when a hand ends
       in an exhaustive draw.

  1.15 Riichi rate

       Percentage of hands in which you declare Riichi...

  1.16 Riichi success rate

       ...and the percentage of those in which you go on to win.

o Page 2

  2.01 Calling rate

       This shows how often you call tiles by Chii/Pon/Kan.

  2.02 Average hand win points

       This is the average value of your winning hands.

  2.03 Average payment amount

       This one's the average amount you pay when you get ronned.

  The next row is the first of the Yaku (scoring element) counts which show the
  number of times you've been awarded each Yaku in a winning hand.

  2.04 Menzen Tsumo (Concealed Self-Draw)

  2.05 Haitei (Last-Tile Tsumo)

  2.06 Houtei (Last-Tile Ron)

  2.07 Chankan (Robbing the Kong)

  2.08 Rinshan Kaihou (After a Kong)

  2.09 Riichi

  2.10 Ippatsu ("one-shot" win after Riichi)

  2.11 Yakuhai (Pung of dragons, round-wind or seat-wind)

  2.12 Pinfu

  2.13 Tanyao (All Simples)

  2.14 Iipeikou (Pure Double Chow)

  2.15 Daburu Riichi (Double Riichi)

  2.16 San Shoku Doujun (Mixed Triple Chow)

o Page 3

  3.01 San Shoku Doukou (Triple Pung)

  3.02 Ikkitsuukan (Pure Straight)

  3.03 Chanta (Mixed Outside Hand)

  3.04 Toi-Toi (All Pungs)

  3.05 San Ankou (Three Concealed Pungs)

  3.06 San Kantsu (Three Kongs)

  3.07 Chii Toitsu (Seven Pairs)

  3.08 Shou San Gen (Little Three Dragons)

  3.09 Honroutou (All Terminals & Honours)

  3.10 Honitsu (Half Flush)

  3.11 Junchan (Pure Outside Hand)

  3.12 Ryanpeikou (Twice Pure Double Hand)

  3.13 Chinitsu (Full Flush)

  3.14 Nagashi Mangan (All Terminal & Honour Discards)

  After the Yaku counts come the Yakuman (limit-hand) counts...

  3.15 Tenhou (Heavenly Win)

  3.16 Chiihou (Earthly Win)

o Page 4

  4.01 Renhou (Human Win)

       (Although it's listed among the Yakuman, the manual actually lists this
       one as being worth the bottom limit - Mangan.)

  4.02 Dai San Gen (Big Three Dragons)

  4.03 Suu Ankou (Four Concealed Pungs)

  4.04 Suu Kantsu (Four Kongs)

  4.05 Kokushimusou (Thirteen Orphans)

  4.06 Chinroutou (All Terminals)

  4.07 Ryuuiisou (All Green)

  4.08 Tsuuiisou (All Honours)

  4.09 Chuurenpoutou (Nine Gates)

  4.10 Shou Suu Shii (Little Four Winds)

  4.11 Dai Sharin (Big Wheels)

  4.12 Dai Suu Shii (Big Four Winds)

  4.13 Suu Ankou Tanki Machi (Four Concealed Pungs won on pair wait)

  4.14 Juu-San Men Machi Kokushimusou (Thirteen Orphans won on a 13-sided wait)

  4.15 Junsei Chuurenpoutou (Pure Nine Gates - i.e. won on 9-sided wait)

  4.16 Kazoe Yakuman (counted Yakuman)

o Page 5

  The remainder of the stats listings show your success rates for the various
  cheating techniques that appear in the game (see Section 06). A score of 100%
  means that you have never failed when using that tech.

  5.01 Genroku loading (draw-loading)

       All variations of Genroku loading are listed together here.

  5.02 Bakudan loading (deal-loading)

       All variations of Bakudan loading are listed together here.       

  5.03 Bukko Nuki loading

  5.04 Tsubame Gaeshi loading

  5.05 Ni no Tenhou (Heavenly Win on 2)

  5.06 Go no Tenhou (Heavenly Win on 5)

  5.07 Bukko Nuki

  5.08 Haipai Bukko Nuki (dealing Bukko Nuki)

  5.09 San Hai Nuki (three-tile Nuki)

  5.10 Fuuji Nuki

  5.11 Tsubame Gaeshi

  5.12 Nigirikomi (double draw)

  5.13 Tsumo Surikae (draw switch)

  5.14 Yama Surikae (wall switch)

  5.15 Kawa Surikae (discard switch)

  5.16 Yama Zurashi (wall slide)

o Page 6

  6.01 Dora Kaeshi (Dora exchange)

  6.02 San Hai Tsumo (three-tile draw)

  6.03 Erebaataa (elevator)

  6.04 Modoshi Tsumo (returning draw)

  6.05 Ni Mou Pai (second tile read)

  6.06 Haji Mou Pai (wall read)

  6.07 Ganpai (gun tiles)

  6.08 Tooshi (communication)

  6.09 Okurikomi (feeding)

------< OPTIONS >------------------------------------------------- [Section 11]

The options menu can be accessed from the bottom-right button on the main menu.
It's also available from the third menu option within the Story Mode.

There are seven configurable options. You can pick one with d-pad up/down and
change it with d-pad left/right. Press A to exit and save any changes or press B
to exit and lose any changes; in both cases if you made changes you'll need to
then pick the left option to confirm (i.e. confirm save or loss respectively).

The default setting for each option is indicated here with an asterisk (*).

1    Name: Game Speed

  Options: Fast / Normal* / Slow

     Info: This controls the speed at which players make their moves.

           Setting this to Slow will make it much easier to catch      ___|___
           someone when they cheat (by tapping their coloured hand      |___|
           on the touchscreen) but each game will take much longer.    .-----.
           Conversely with the Fast option you will need to be         | .-. |
           pretty quick to catch a cheater but your games won't take   ' '-' '
           so long. (partly because you'll get less Chombo draws!)       KOU

           Since the game plays so slowly I favour the Fast option here. This is
           indicated with the kanji Kou (shown above) which means "high".

2    Name: Tile Colour

  Options: Purple* / Blue / Green

     Info: This alters the colour of the tile backs.

           Whichever colour you choose, tiles planted in your wall using the
           loading techniques (see Section 06) will be shown with grey backs.

3    Name: Table Colour

  Options: Green* / Maroon / Blue

     Info: This alters the colour of the tabletop.

4    Name: Tile Arrangement

  Options: On* / Off

     Info: By default your hand of tiles will be organised into groups (suits,
           winds and dragons) and displayed in sequence (i.e. numerical order
           for the suit tiles) - just like in other mahjong video-games.

           However if you're a pro (or you wanna look gangsta!) you can turn
           this option off and your initial tiles will remain in the random
           order they were drawn from the wall. Each time you draw a tile during
           play it will be added at the right end of your hand.

5    Name: Background Music (BGM)

  Options: On* / Off

     Info: Turn the music on or off.

6    Name: Sound Effects (SE)

  Options: On* / Off

     Info: Turn the sound effects on or off.

7    Name: Voice

  Options: On* / Off

     Info: Turn the in-game speech one or off.

*This is the default setting for the option.

------< RULES >--------------------------------------------------- [Section 12]

The two sub-sections here describe respectively the optional rules which can be
applied in Single-Player mode and some of the fixed rules used in the game.

= Rule Options =

There are seven optional rules available in the game. The menu has eight options
in total but the last one just turns cheating on/off.

You'll be shown the rules menu whenever you start a new game in Single-Player
mode and I think it's also shown in Wireless Play and Download Play multiplayer.

Use the d-pad to make changes or press Select to restore the default settings.
Press A to confirm and pick the left option (yes) to continue.

All eight options have the following two settings available:-

  _/___  | _
  /___   |/ \   ARI
 /|___|  |   |  denotes "existence" and describes a rule that's applied (on)
  |   |    _/

 /_______   | 
 _|_|_|_|_  |      NASHI
  |_|_|_|   |      means "without" and describes a rule that's not applied (off)
  / \ \ \   |___/

The rule options are explained below and the default settings indicated with an
asterisk (*). (Basically everything is On except the first one.)

You cannot adjust the rule options for Story Mode; I think the game applies the
default settings there. Certainly games are always played with cheats (except
for the very last match of the main story sequence).

1    Name: South Round Extension

  Options: Ari (on) / Nashi* (off)

     Info: A game of Japanese mahjong is usually played over two wind-rounds but
           it is also possible to play a shorter Ton Puu Sen ("east wind match")
           which is played over a single round (with a round-wind of east). All
           games in Akko de Pon are one-round matches but this option relates to
           the Nannyuu rule which can extend this duration.

           When the Nannyuu rule is applied to a one-round match, the game must
           continue into a second (south) round if no player has achieved the
           target score by the end of the first. This target score is typically
           30,100 pts which represents the player making a profit over the 30k
           points with which they bought into the game.

           Nan means "south" and Nyuu means "enter". A more common variant of
           this rule is Shaanyuu whereby a normal two-round match can extend
           into a third (west) round.

2    Name: Bankruptcy

  Options: Ari* / Nashi

     Info: This is the Dobon rule which ends the game early when someone's score
           drops below zero.

           If this rule is not applied then the game would continue and the
           player has a negative score - and they can continue to lose points!

3    Name: Open Tanyao and "After-Attach"

  Options: Ari* / Nashi

     Info: You get two rule options for the price of one here! They cannot be
           allowed or disallowed individually - you use both or neither.

           The first is Kuitan which lets you claim Tanyao (All Simples) on
           an open hand, i.e. a hand containing one or more exposed sets that
           were completed by stealing a discard by Chii/Pon/Kan.

           The "Kui" in the rule name refers to eating - when you steal discards
           from other players by Pon or Chii you are, in a sense, "eating" their
           tiles and so Kuitan is literally "eating Tanyao".

           The second rule included in the bundle is Atozuke which permits you
           to declare a win on a hand that contained no Yaku (scoring elements)
           until you added the winning tile.

           A basic translation of the common kanji spelling of Atozuke is simply
           "after-attach" - the Yaku is not present previously but instead it is
           attached afterwards.

4    Name: Tenpai Form

  Options: Ari* / Nashi

     Info: A Tenpai or "ready" hand is one that requires only one more tile to
           achieve a complete structure of (usually) four sets and one pair.

           This is the Keishiki Tenpai rule with which a hand can be formally
           recognised as Tenpai even if it lacks Yaku (scoring element) or the
           potential to make one. This has implications on the distribution of
           the No-Ten Bappu (the 3000 pts shared when a hand ends in a draw) and
           on whether a Renchan (extra hand or "continuance") is played.

           Keishiki means "form" or "format" and Tenpai means "listening (to)
           tiles" - the player is alert, trying to spot their winning tile.

5    Name: Multiple Ron

  Options: Ari* / Nashi

     Info: It's possible for two, or sometimes even three, players to declare a
           Ron win on the same discarded tile. When this rule is Ari all such
           wins are valid and the discarder must play both/all winners.

           When this rule is Nashi the Atame Hane ("head bump") rule is applied 
           instead and, of the players declaring a win, only the one seated
           closest to the discarder's right gets their points.

6    Name: Conditional Two-Han Minimum

  Options: Ari* / Nashi

     Info: Normally the game is played with a one-Han minimum - you need Yaku
           (scoring elements) worth at least one Han in order to declare a win.
           With this rule in effect, however, a two-Han minimum is applied when
           the Honba counter shows five or more (i.e. after five consecutive
           hands have resulted in dealer wins or draws).

           Han from Dora bonus tiles and red fives (see below) are not counted
           when checking if a hand meets the one/two-Han minimum requirements.

           The formal name for this rule option is Ryan Han Shibari. Ryan is the
           Japanese pronunciation of the Mandarin Chinese counting-number 2, Han
           is the Japanese name for doubles and Shibari means "binding". The
           name is sometimes shortened to Ryanshi.

7    Name: Red Fives

  Options: Ari* / Nashi

     Info: With this rule option you can choose if you want to play with Akapai
           (literally "red tiles").

           These are special versions of the number 5 tiles in the three suits
           which have purely red markings. Each one functions like a Dora tile
           so it adds one Han (double) to your score although, as with the Dora,
           it cannot be used to meet the one-Han minimum for going out.

           Some games offer various options but in Akko de Pon there will always
           be one red five in each of the three suits. These will replace normal
           fives so you play with the standard 136 tiles as usual.

8    Name: Cheating

  Options: Ari* / Nashi

     Info: You can use this option to disable the cheating functions in Single-
           Player mode. By default they will be included in your games but you
           can only ever use cheat techniques which you've unlocked by wining
           matches in Story Mode.

*This is the default setting for the rule.

= Fixed Rules =

The following rules apply to all matches in Akko de Pon.

All games are Ton Puu Sen ("east wind match") played over a single wind-round,
although a second round is possible under the south round extension (Nannyuu)
optional rule explained above.

The game recognises a pretty standard set of Yaku (scoring elements), including
Renhou (Human Win) and Nagashi Mangan (All Terminal & Honour Discards) which are
both paid at the Mangan limit.

The list of Yakuman (limit-hands) permitted includes Dai Sharin (Big Wheels) for
a hand of 22334455667788 in the Pinzu (Dots) suit and Kazoe Yakuman (counted
Yakuman) for a hand with Yaku and Dora worth thirteen Han (doubles) or more.

The usual four Double Yakuman are also allowed - Dai Suu Shii (Big Four Winds),
Kokushimusou Juu-San Men Machi (Thirteen Orphans on thirteen-sided wait), Suu
Ankou Tanki Machi (Four Concealed Pungs on pair wait) and Junsei Chuurenpoutou
(Pure Nine Gates on a nine-sided wait).

Kuikae is Nashi - if you have a complete Chow or Pung concealed in your hand
you cannot call a tile by Chii or Pon using two of those tiles and then discard
immediately the third tile from the original set. In such a situation the game
will not let you discard that tile, you must discard another one.

Tenpai Renchan is Ari - not only does the dealer "stay on" in a Renchan (extra
hand or "continuance") when they win a hand, the same applies if a hand results
in an exhaustive draw and the dealer has a Tenpai (ready) hand.

Agari Yame is Nashi - if the dealer wins the final hand and is leading on points
they are not given the option to end the game early. Instead they must play the
subsequent Renchan and try not to lose their lead!

The game recognises the abortive draw of Kyuu Shu Kyuu Hai ("nine types, nine
tiles") which can be declared when a player has nine or more unique Terminal and
Honour tiles in their hand on their first turn. However it seems to be a little
inconsistent and doesn't always give you the option to take the draw. If you do
get the choice though, pick the left option to accept the re-deal or the right
one to continue. (and go for Kokushi!)

If two or more players have the same score at the end of a match they will be
tied in position. For example if the final scores are 30000, 30000, 22000 and
18000 then the first two players will both be awarded 1st place. When playing
Story Mode this is sufficient to "pass" the current match. In one game I caught
the dealer cheating in three consecutive hands at the start of the match (and he
paid 12k Chombo each time) so the scores were 37000, 37000, 37000 and -11000.
The bankruptcy ended the game and three other players shared 1st place.

Players always begin with a starting score of 25,000 points each.

Furiten Riichi is not permitted. You cannot call Riichi when you have previously
discarded one of the tiles on which you could now declare a win.

------< CONTACT >------------------------------------------------- [Section 13]

I welcome all feedback on this guide and any contributions you'd like to make.
I'm also happy to receive questions about this or any other mahjong game, or
about the rules and terminology of Japanese mahjong.

You can email me at barticle at hotmail.com - obviously changing the "at" to an
@ and removing the spaces. It would be helpful if you include the word "mahjong"
in the subject line and tell me which game you're playing.

------< THANKS >-------------------------------------------------- [Section 14]

I would like to thank...

o Etsuko for the Horipro info and checking my spellings of the names

o assorted Wikipedia Japan authors for the comprehensive online Horipro roster

o USPML for hosting my PDF mahjong guide (and GameFAQs for hosting this one!)

o tangorin.com for their awesome online dictionary

o Nintendo for their handy Kanji Sonomama DS Rakubiki Jiten

o Wolfgang Hadamitzky and Mark Spahn for their classic kanji dictionary

o whoever invented furigana

o sushief_inc (eBay trader) for their excellent worldwide games sales service

o Yahtzee Croshaw for his magnificent weekly rants

o Sending Orbs for their beautiful music

I will be happy to give credit and thanks to anyone who makes a contribution.
        ___________                                          ___        
        \______   /                              ___        /  /        
              /  /                       __      \_/       /  /         
             /   \___ ________ _________/  \__ ___ ______ /  /  ________
.-------o   /  __   / \___   //  ___/\_   ___//  //  ___//  /  /  __   /
| ANOTHER  /  / /  /_____/  //  /     /  /   /  //  /   /  /  /   \/  / 
'---------/  /-/  //  __   //  /-----/  /---/  //  /---/  /--/  _____/---------.
         /  / /  //  / /  //  /     /  /   /  //  /   /  /  /  /         GUIDE |
        /   \/  //   \/  //  /     /   \_ /  //   \_ /   \ /   \________ o-----'
        \______/ \______/ \_/      \____/ \_/ \____/ \___/ \___________/
--
Akko de Pon (DS) Guide
Copyright 2011 James R. Barton
Initial version 1.00 completed 3 March 2011

All trademarks and copyrights contained in this document are owned by their
respective trademark and copyright holders.

This guide may be downloaded and printed for personal, private, non-commercial
use only. This work is subject to copyright. It may not be hosted online or
otherwise distributed publically or reproduced either in whole or in part
without the advance written consent of the author. Any violation would
constitute an infringement of copyright and is strictly prohibited.

The only websites with the author's consent to publish this guide are GameFAQs
(www.gamefaqs.com) and its affiliates (i.e. Gamespot).

If you find this file hosted on any other site I would be grateful if you would
inform me at the email address given at the top. Thanks!

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