You're browsing the GameFAQs Message Boards as a guest. Sign Up for free (or Log In if you already have an account) to be able to post messages, change how messages are displayed, and view media in posts.

User Info: Sapientia

Sapientia
2 months ago#1
Before I begin, this isn't an attempt to excessively hate on Skyward Sword. I have a lost of nostalgia for it, even though it does have its flaws. But I had a sudden moment of insight as to why a certain aspect of its execution -- the backtracking -- falls so flat. And I am here to share it with you all.

In many older Zelda games, calling it "backtracking" is actually something of a misnomer, because for every one step back, you were actually taking two steps forward simultaneously. In Ocarina of Time, whenever you had to go back to being a kid again, you weren't doing it to get or do some arbitrary thing. It was always to unlock an item, like the Lens of Truth or the Silver Gauntlets, or at least learn something that would benefit your experience once you became an adult again.

In The Wind Waker, going from Greatfish to Windfall to Outset Island got you Bombs, a wallet upgrade, and the Elixir Soup in addition to the pearl from Jabun. In Twilight Princess, before climbing Death Mountain, you had to go back to Ordon Village, but doing so gives you the Iron Boots, a Heart Piece, and an ideal chance to tell the villagers that their kids are alive. In Spirit Tracks, when you have to take Alfonzo home to Aboda Village, it's so he can put together a cannon for your train. And in the process, Niko gives you a stamp book you can use to unlock other rewards later.

In Skyward Sword, not only are your reasons for backtracking lazy and contrived, but the goal each time is something stupid or arbitrary that doesn't benefit you or your quest at all. You have to go back through Skyview Temple just to get a bottle of water to dump over the Water Dragon. Then you have to escort Scrapper up Eldin Volcano the long way, with no new items and nothing learned. He just didn't want to fly back up into the sky. Both instances are there to pad out gameplay and not accomplish anything else.

Looking back on it, I guess this isn't quite limited to backtracking either. Tracking down all the Kikwis? Finding the key to the Earth Temple? What purpose did any of these serve in the grand scheme of things? This game is a lot more padded out than I used to think before writing this.
Think like a proton: always positive.
Also, never take anything I say TOO seriously. It's just a game site, after all.
(edited 2 months ago)

User Info: DragonFistAbysi

DragonFistAbysi
2 months ago#2
I would like to say otherwise, but I actually agree with you.

The fields are fun to play around in, and while it doesn't reach the same extreme as Tales of Legendia, it tends to be rather boring because, for me, I want to see something new, but it is honestly just the same road with a few new fence posts. Compare this to A Link to the Past, which I have played many, many times, and I don't see it standing up to scrutiny. The exception might be for people who just really like good graphics above all else.
Not just anyone can be an idiot. It takes skill.

User Info: BrerOswald

BrerOswald
1 month ago#3
Honestly it’s the one major flaw with this game. That and the Imprisoned.
#1 resident Disney Parks expert on GameFAQs

User Info: DragonFistAbysi

DragonFistAbysi
1 month ago#4
@BrerOswald
I was wondering where you got your name from. Given the context, I would almost think it was related to Oswald Chronicles. Granted, that is only one of thousands of possible stories.
Not just anyone can be an idiot. It takes skill.

User Info: BrerOswald

BrerOswald
1 month ago#5
DragonFistAbysi posted...
@BrerOswald
I was wondering where you got your name from. Given the context, I would almost think it was related to Oswald Chronicles. Granted, that is only one of thousands of possible stories.

I’m a huge Disney fan, so it’s a combination of two things on that front. “Brer” is a term that means brother. I believe it comes from the Uncle Remus folk tales, which was adapted into the banned Disney film Song of the South, which was later adapted into my favourite Disney Ride/attraction, Splash Mountain.

Oswald is taken from “Oswald the Lucky Rabbit”, the Disney character that preceded Mickey Mouse. Since the main character in Splash Mountain is Brer Rabbit, it ends up becoming a combination of two Disney rabbits.

At the end of the day, my name is just in reference to my favourite Disney Ride and my favourite Disney character.
#1 resident Disney Parks expert on GameFAQs

User Info: DragonFistAbysi

DragonFistAbysi
1 month ago#6
Oh, okay. That's cool. I never did much research on Disney. I was a big fan as a kid, and collected plastic figures until the Disney store stopped selling them, but I never really looked into its history.
Not just anyone can be an idiot. It takes skill.

User Info: PappinAce

PappinAce
1 month ago#7
Agreed. This game is transparently rushed and incomplete, bordering on a beta tech-demo. We all know what the bulk of the development time was wasted on. Back when this came out I knew at the first time playing that it is an embarrassment to call it a Zelda instalment.
(edited 1 month ago)

User Info: PixelAndy

PixelAndy
1 month ago#8
Very true
Official Ness of the Super Smash Bros Ultimate Board
SSBU CHARACTER WISH LIST: Ninten, Porky, Banjo & Kazooie, Tetra, Rayman, Louie, AiAi, Rover (AC), Steve

User Info: DragonFistAbysi

DragonFistAbysi
4 weeks ago#9
This game isn't that bad. It's good!

What's good about it?

It's got... It's got, uh, virtues!

Such as...?

... ... ...
Not just anyone can be an idiot. It takes skill.