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User Info: squall1969

squall1969
11 years ago#1
Okay, this is of course, my theory as the ending up open to interpretation. FYI...This topic may be a little long to explain.

After finishing the game, i went to this board and went looking straight for the ending topic thread. After adding my theory, I actually made a whole paragraph with some comparison to Donnie Darko but deleted it as I thought maybe I'm going too deep to it and deleted it. Later on browsing through the topics, I saw someone also brought it up. So then, I went to Starbucks drinking some coffee and couldnt get the game off my head. Then BAM!!! it hit me.

So here's my theory:
If you look at the game, the game makes no secret of actually using a lot of things for references. The Shining, Stephen King reference, guy waking up the after accident reminded of silent hill, etc. But I think another influence is Donnie Darko

In Donnie Darko, the movie was confusing to watch in the beginning because while you're watching the movie, you're led to believe that things are unfolding but in reality, things already have, and what you're watching is actually a time loop and the events are leading up to a key point again. The KEY EVENT in Donnie Darko is the Plane part falling and killing him in his room. He was supposed to die but he saved himself by travelling back in time. Because he was supposed to die, the world around him was being destroyed. So in the end, to make things right, when the KEY EVENT happened, he stayed in his room to sacrifice himself, to make things right.

the KEY EVENT in Alan Wake is him jumping in Lake to save Alice. When you're playing the game, you think the events again are also unfolding but it already has...Let me explain. In the ending of the game, Alan creates Mr. Scratch, he tells him that he is the one that will meet his friends. So, the whole time we're playing, we're actually playing Mr. Scratch, which explains the Alan Wake that we see in the TV screen. Alan Knew he had to stay in the cabin to continue writing but he also needed to escape to save Alice or perhaps himself, so he created Mr. Scratch. Sooooo, somewhere midgame when it showed the KEY EVENT again and shows him escaping, you're led to belive that Alan wrote himself to escape but in fact, the Alan that emerged from the water and escaped was Mr. Scratch, the real Alan had to stay in the cabin to continue writing the story. Which is why while you're playing, you'll get glimpsed of Alan in the TV talking to himself and trying to find a way to continue telling the story. That's the REAL Alan, and the one we're controlling in the game is in fact...Mr. Scratch.

So when the KEY EVENT happened in the ending... where Alan jumps in the lake again to save Alice...Only one emerged out of the water, Alice, the Alan Wake that jumped sacrificed himself to bring her back. Only this Alan that sacrificed himself is Mr. Scratch...the real Alan is still in the cabin writing the story.

I think its brilliant though because we have all 3 possible ending scenario, the good, the bad and cliffhanger in one ending.
THE BAD: much like Donnie Darko, and Thomas Zane, Alan jumping back in the water and not emerging showed he sacrificed himself.
THE GOOD: He was able to save Alice
THE CLIFFHANGER: The REAL Alan Wake is still trapped in the cabin (darkness). Because the real threat is still to come, because its not a lake, its an ocean

...

As long as there are tests, there will be prayer in public schools.

User Info: psprulz2007

psprulz2007
11 years ago#2
That was a good movie...but I honestly think this is the best theory
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User Info: kingleg

kingleg
11 years ago#3
Wow, I'm going to have to say that's the best interpretation I've seen thus far. The only loophole I can think of is the missing week between jumping into the lake and car crash. I thought it was during that missing week that alan wrote all of the manuscript except the ending part....that would also be when he made the television "notes to self...," but I do like your interpretation and wonder how it fits with the points I brought up....

User Info: gamerbug94

gamerbug94
11 years ago#4
Good theory and all but you do realize the Alan on the TV screens are shots of him during the week that he wrote the story right? he wrote the ENTIRE story in that week (Missing only 1 page, the ending, which he writes at the end of the game)
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"Most people have to act the roles given to them. Then again, most of them haven't even noticed they're acting."

User Info: SRR Capdown

SRR Capdown
11 years ago#5

From: squall1969 | #001
In the ending of the game, Alan creates Mr. Scratch, he tells him that he is the one that will meet his friends. So, the whole time we're playing, we're actually playing Mr. Scratch, which explains the Alan Wake that we see in the TV screen.


Few flaws here;
1. It was Zane who 'gave' Wake Mr Scratch and said "he's the one who'll meet your friends."
2. The Alan Wake on the TV screens are already explained in game; When the game properly commences, Alan is missing a week from his life. When Alan sees himself on the TVs he's having little flashes of memory. It's him remembering himself sat in the cabin typing out the manuscript, whilst under the influence of Barbara Jagger.

But the concept that we're playing as Mr Scratch has been discussed a few times already and I don't disagree with it (although I'm not sure if I agree either). I've theorised before that, as to bring balance and unlike Zane, Wake has to sacrifice himself to bring back Alice (without being tainted by the Dark Presence like Jagger was). Except like you've said, he sacrificed Mr Scratch instead.

I do like the theory though. If some of the bugs could be worked out of it, it'd fit properly. I think the fact that we still hear Wake narrating at the end (the "it's not a lake; it's an ocean" line) is a signal that he, or at least during the point in which Alice surfaces, was still in Bird's Leg Cabin.
Fire Bucket

User Info: squall1969

squall1969
11 years ago#6
agreed, there's definitely loopholes but as Alan narrated in the beginning, in a nutshell, a good horror story begs us to "WHY"? The unanswered mysteries is what stays with us in the end.

Of course, they gotta save some juicy tidbits for the sequel :)
As long as there are tests, there will be prayer in public schools.

User Info: KegIuneq

KegIuneq
11 years ago#7
I have yet to understand what the hell does Alan mean by "It's not a lake, it's an ocean."

I saw someone suggest that perhaps Alan wrote the story that way to prevent Alice from being taken by the Dark Presence and, therefore, survive the accident. However, if the Dark Presence has changed its source of power, Alan Wake cannot be at the Bird's Leg Cabin, because such location only existed due to the presence of the Dark Presence in the Cauldron Lake. So, in other words, he would have written himself into a ****ing plot-hole and be stuck on a limbo.

Come to think about it, that would be brilliant! What better way than to punish a writer than using it's own creation to imprison him in the narrative? Ironic and fitting.
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User Info: SRR Capdown

SRR Capdown
11 years ago#8

From: The Dark Legend | #007
The Dark Legend | Posted 5/24/2010 12:04:26 AM | message detail | filter | quote | #007
I have yet to understand what the hell does Alan mean by "It's not a lake, it's an ocean."


My take on it is this; One of the first things said in the game, by Zane (when he's just a talking lighthouse in Wake's dream), is an extract of one of his poems. It mentions something along the lines of "there are many ports of call in the dark ocean" (not word for wrod correct, I'll admit, but I can't go back and check as it'll overwrite my current Nightmare playthrough).

The ending is a direct reference to the poem. What it can mean is that Cauldron Lake is just one of many ports in which the Dark Presence and or Alan stops. The reason I don't think it's Alan writing the Dark Presence to have more power is because it comes across as more of a realisation than anything else. A moment of clarity, which one would expect if he's defeated the Dark Presence, as its taint in him would also be defeated. And the reaosn I think it's a moment of clarity is because after Zane cites the poem in the introductory dream sequence, he also tells Wake to remember it.

I also liek to think it's Wake being metaphorical about the age of the Dark Presence. It's not something that came about with the lake, but it's something as ancient as the oceans. It would make sense with regard to hsi writing style, especially after the heavy hint about metaphors when Breaker says that she thinks Wake was always too heavy on them.

Come to think about it, that would be brilliant! What better way than to punish a writer than using it's own creation to imprison him in the narrative? Ironic and fitting.


However, I do love this. I think it's genius, even if I don't think it's actually what happened, it's a nice little note.
Fire Bucket

User Info: SRR Capdown

SRR Capdown
11 years ago#9
Apologies about the many silly spelling errors.
Fire Bucket

User Info: squall1969

squall1969
11 years ago#10
2. The Alan Wake on the TV screens are already explained in game; When the game properly commences, Alan is missing a week from his life. When Alan sees himself on the TVs he's having little flashes of memory. It's him remembering himself sat in the cabin typing out the manuscript, whilst under the influence of Barbara Jagger.

I think this is the part where they do try to do misdirection...basically where they try to throw you off by making you think its going this way, when in fact, it also going another way.

Yes, the Alan in the TV that's stuck in the cabin are flashes of memory, but is also developer's misdirection in letting you think that's all to it. When it showed Alan writing himself to escape, its doing a misdirection leading you to think that he did indeed escaped but he didnt, its the Mr. Scratch that he created as he needed to stay to continue writing the story. So in essence, The real Alan Wake never left the cabin, which is what you see at the very ending when he makes a comment that its not a lake, its an ocean, you can see that The REAL Alan Wake has been at that same room all this time. You can see the darkness swirling outside the window, he never left the darkness cabin. And it also explains why the Mr. Scratch we've been controlling all this time is missing that 1 week. Cause in essence, he wasnt created. During this time, The real Alan Wake was still fleshing out the story until he creates Mr Scratch, so when Mr. Scratch emerged from the water, that was his birth.
As long as there are tests, there will be prayer in public schools.
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