• Post New Message
You're browsing the GameFAQs Message Boards as a guest. Sign Up for free (or Log In if you already have an account) to be able to post messages, change how messages are displayed, and view media in posts.
  1. Boards
  2. Genesis
  3. why has the mega cd got such a bad rep

User Info: Storminator16

Storminator16
2 months ago#11
From the standpoint of the US, it was marketed poorly. and there was no clear focus from Sega of Japan. The only Sega CD advertising I can remember were for Sewer Shark, those bad FMV music games, and Night Trap. When I was a teenager, I wanted a Turbo Duo over it, just to play the huge backlog that already existed for both the PC Engine/TurboGrafx-16 and those CD games I knew existed for the system. Really, NEC could have killed it over here if Nintendo didn't have a stranglehold on developers.
(edited 2 months ago)

User Info: KingMikeX

KingMikeX
2 months ago#12
How the TurboGrafx flopped so hard in North America is something we can only speculate on, but so far that speculation is on NEC making enough mistakes on their own that Nintendo was probably only a small factor.
(such as game selection, and what little marketing it got being kind of ridiculous)

Oddly enough, Nintendo probably actually helped the console towards its current level of popularity by allowing its games on Wii VC. (though interest was kind of the rise a little before that)
(edited 2 months ago)

User Info: metaphysician

metaphysician
2 months ago#13
I read a history of the PC Engine/Turbo-Grafx 16 once. While Nintendo's efforts to lock up exclusivity didn't help, I think the main takeaway is that the NEC/Hudson dual ownership ultimately killed the thing in the West. It created a weird system where, once something went wrong, nobody actually had the necessary financial incentive to invest in fixing things.

User Info: bruplex

bruplex
2 months ago#14
"I've made a terrible mistake" - me, after buying the Sega CD in 1992

In a weird plot twist, I actually had the Turbo CD before the Sega CD - and absolutely loved the TGCD. It took me about a year of working delivering newspapers to earn the TGCD, and I was working as a 16-year-old dishwasher saving for the Sega CD.

Consider the high-quality games that came out for the TGCD: Ys Books I and II, Ys III, Final Zone 2, Monster Lair, and Valis II were in my personal collection. The pack-in game with the Sega CD? The bottomlessly bad Sewer Shark.

Sewer Shark was an absolute disaster and a poor example of the Sega CD's potential. Games were expensive and I didn't want to risk getting another FMV dud, especially when there were better Turbo CD games in the market. (Sidenote: I still have both systems)

I eventually got Dark Wizard, which I really liked, along with Sonic CD and, for some reason, Tomcat Alley (I think that one was a gift). It wasn't until years later that I discovered some of the better non-FMV titles. The problem was that Sega heavily promoted their worst games, while pretty-good-to-excellent games were left in the dark.

At the time, I ended up with only a few more CD games from that timeframe: Sherlock Holmes and Cosmic Fantasy 2 on the TGCD (both... duds) and Final Fight CD (I liked it).

By the time I had the money to invest in more Sega CD games, the world had moved on to PSX and the N64.
Use your computer mouse to navigate the internets. Be sure to talk to everyone you meet. You're sure to gain lots of valuable information.

User Info: spiffyone

spiffyone
2 months ago#15
As I stated in another topic, it was a Japanese solution to a Japanese problem: MD was losing to PCE in part because PCE CD was taking off there in a way. And also the tech envy that Nakayama had for SFC’s capabilities, and his hardware focused mindset feeding into his thinking that Nintendo would overtake Sega’s lead in the West as well.

But that wasn’t really a problem in the West. See, Nakayama’s mistake was thinking of Sega as a hardware company rather than a software company that made hardware on which to release the software and that of third parties so as to gain royalties and broaden the hardware base which would pay dividends for their own software.

To put it simply: it was about the games. In the West, Sega had the game library that appealed to the markets, and moreso than their competitors. In Japan, that wasn’t the case. The reason that Nakayama all but missed completely was that PCE (and PCE CD) were doing well and better than MD because the types of games that appealed to the Japanese game consumer (RPGs, strategy, visual novels) were released for those platforms. Similar deal with SFC.

The solution to the sales problem in Japan should’ve been more investment in developing and releasing the games that appealed to the JP market, not add-on hardware.

In the West, releasing expensive add-on hardware wasn’t necessary at all. Just release more games of the type that sold well.

User Info: bruplex

bruplex
2 months ago#16
spiffyone posted...
As I stated in another topic, it was a Japanese solution to a Japanese problem:


From everything I've read, Sega of America (specifically, Tom Kalinski) fought against Sega of Japan using this exact logic. For a hot minute, the Genesis was NA's leading console and even when the SNES eventually outpaced it, the two consoles were neck-and-neck for some time. Sega's tri-fecta of blunders (Sega CD, 32x, and the difficult-to-code Saturn) did not come out of the blue.

The worst part was that Sega of America had philosophies that were very gamer-friendly: backward compatibility, low-cost hardware, great in-house game franchises, and an open-mind towards a mature gaming market.

Pushing too many different pieces hardware (including the oft-forgotten Pico) spelled doom, and I think the underlying philosophy began with the Sega / Mega CD. Sega's swan song (in my eyes, at least) were the Amusement Vision games on the Gamecube: F-Zero GX, Super Monkey Ball, and Super Monkey Ball 2.
Use your computer mouse to navigate the internets. Be sure to talk to everyone you meet. You're sure to gain lots of valuable information.

User Info: uffbulle

uffbulle
2 months ago#17
CD audio and more cutscenes is a good fit for RPGs and Adventure/VN games though.
http://minirevver.weebly.com - Mini-reviews, retro vgm tribute, guides and more.
https://platformadventure.weebly.com/ - Platform adventure/metroidvania guide
(edited 2 months ago)

User Info: spiffyone

spiffyone
2 months ago#18
bruplex posted...
For a hot minute, the Genesis was NA's leading console and even when the SNES eventually outpaced it, the two consoles were neck-and-neck for some time. Sega's tri-fecta of blunders (Sega CD, 32x, and the difficult-to-code Saturn) did not come out of the blue.


Genesis was actually in the lead up until ‘95 in NA, and outselling SNES year after year save for ‘92, which SNES won off the back of the MASSIVE boost given to it by the release of Street Fighter II (insane how popular that game was). It was always the tale of the holidays. They’d be neck and neck through the year until November and December, and then Genesis sales would get a sizable boost over SNES’ to give Sega the win.

SoA didn’t need or want SCD because...what for? They were winning without it. A lot of the third party games sold at that time sold better on Genesis by a near 2:1 margin. There was no need for it.

It was the same thing with 32X. And they couldn’t talk Nakayama (Sega head honcho at the time) out of his idea of a “Super Genesis with more color capabilities and scaling” so they tried to salvage it with the 32X project...not really knowing that Sega JP had Saturn that close to completion. Just a clusterf*** all around.

User Info: spiffyone

spiffyone
2 months ago#19
uffbulle posted...
CD audio and more cutscenes is a good fit for RPGs and Adventure/VN games though.


Yeah, but the majority of games released weren’t those types of games. Part of that was that JP third parties didn’t bite because MD as it was had a much smaller install base even at that point in time compared to PCE and SNES. Sega didn’t need to spend money on that hardware. They needed to woo JP third parties to the stock MD. Offer them sweetheart deals or something. They were doing that a tiny bit with the financing scheme they came up with late in MD’s effective lifespan in Japan...but that was really late there (‘94). Could’ve done that sort of thing much sooner.

User Info: sull56ivan2010

sull56ivan2010
2 months ago#20
I'm not going to bother arguing with spiff, but his obsession with saying Sega CD shouldn't exist down everyone's throats is getting borderline annoying.
Nintendo and PC fanboys hate it when gamers play more than their games
Patriots fans: The most spoiled insecure bandwagon ever. Worse than Philadelphia fans
  1. Boards
  2. Genesis
  3. why has the mega cd got such a bad rep
  • Post New Message

GameFAQs Answers