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  3. What's the best way to scale up an image for a desktop backround?

User Info: HeliosMagi

HeliosMagi
1 month ago#1
I have some wallpapers that I could only find in sub-1080p resolutions. What are the best ways to resize them to 1920x1080 while losing as little sharpness and creating as few artifacts as possible? And what's the best free program or website for doing it?
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User Info: farigonti

farigonti
1 month ago#2
If it’s photo realistic, not sure. If it’s simple animation, google up a free vectorizing tool.

User Info: Snuckie7

Snuckie7
1 month ago#3
http://waifu2x.udp.jp

Ignore the weeb name this actually works pretty well.
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User Info: SinisterSlay

SinisterSlay
1 month ago#4
Just select the wallpaper and choose to make it fit your screen. Windows upscales it on it's own. Has been doing that since at least Windows 95, probably earlier.
He who stumbles around in darkness with a stick is blind. But he who... sticks out in darkness... is... fluorescent! - Brother Silence

User Info: BombermanGold

BombermanGold
1 month ago#5
SinisterSlay posted...
Just select the wallpaper and choose to make it fit your screen. Windows upscales it on it's own. Has been doing that since at least Windows 95, probably earlier.

I think TC wants to make sure that said upscaled image doesn't get blurry.
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User Info: SinisterSlay

SinisterSlay
1 month ago#6
BombermanGold posted...
SinisterSlay posted...
Just select the wallpaper and choose to make it fit your screen. Windows upscales it on it's own. Has been doing that since at least Windows 95, probably earlier.

I think TC wants to make sure that said upscaled image doesn't get blurry.

Then they need special machine learning tech or something from csi Miami.
He who stumbles around in darkness with a stick is blind. But he who... sticks out in darkness... is... fluorescent! - Brother Silence

User Info: Black_Assassin

Black_Assassin
1 month ago#7
Snuckie7 posted...
http://waifu2x.udp.jp
Ignore the weeb name this actually works pretty well.

This for upscaling.
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User Info: yohabroha

yohabroha
1 month ago#8
enhance

enhance
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User Info: KillerTruffle

KillerTruffle
1 month ago#9
BombermanGold posted...
I think TC wants to make sure that said upscaled image doesn't get blurry.

That's not exactly possible. When you're upscaling, you're literally adding data that doesn't exist. Different systems do it differently, but none are fantastic at it. You can't actually add detail that isn't there. Windows scaling a smaller image up is sort of on the low to mid range in terms of quality, and will result in some blur. Photoshop is a bit more sophisticated, and can make better guesses at what each "missing" pixel should show, but at the end, it's still going to be blurrier than the original image, because all *any* system can do is guess to fill in the blanks.

There are other factors too, like the ratio of the source image's resolution to the upscaled one, the complexity of the image, etc...

The only images you can perfect upscale with no loss of quality at all are vector images.
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User Info: Black_Assassin

Black_Assassin
1 month ago#10
You could add a sharpen filter in the end ;-).
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