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User Info: Dave_rawkzorz

Dave_rawkzorz
4 weeks ago#41
MrDude1 posted...
TrulyEpicLawls posted...
MrDude1 posted...
TrulyEpicLawls posted...
MrDude1 posted...
@TrulyEpicLawls posted...
It's less about the parts and more about you as a person really. Are you a realist, elitist or pseudo-'OCD' about graphics/performance?

If you don't get triggered at the mere suggestion you don't buy something recent, brand new and in 4K @ 75+ FPS, well there are CPUs/GPUs from 2011/2013 that can still run games well on Ultra in 1080p HD, or at least mixed-Ultra/Very High. So buy great parts rather than simply the newest and you can go for years (and save even more if buying pre-owned reliably).

If you panic as soon as you think those shadows aren't pixel perfect and the shrubbery isn't fully detailed because you had to drop a couple settings to Very High (and the previous paragraph's already got you pounding your keyboard with a scoffing slanderous response), then longevity is gonna go down for you and cost up.

Unless a game depends on shadows for gameplay, I don't care about shadows and will probably turn it down to low or off. Right now, I am all right with 1080p 30 fps for most games, and I'll turn down any sort of graphical detail that isn't obvious to my eyes to get it. That's why I don't need a high end gaming pc.

I do want a build with enough upgrade potential so I don't need to replace my cpu and mobo in the next decade to play games with any decent 1080p performance.


It might be worth looking at motherboards closely. My one is great because it has a one-click overclock, so rather than anything complicated, I just click a button in the menu. Hopefully all works fine, and that's it. It also has a display that shows a number code. So if my PC froze or powered up but sat doing nothing, I could see what the problem area was immediately. Saved a lot of time, tears and maybe money.

As for CPU longevity the right one will last a long time, but overclocking really helps. A lot of people are still using the 2500K overclocked, which is 8 years old now. Combined with my 6-year-old GPU, I'm still not yet at the point where I need to look around for upgrades. Watch Dogs 2 was the first game I had to turn any settings down (and that was just 'Shadows' to 'Very High' and avoiding the NASA-tier anti-aliasing). Destiny 2 is more recent, only a year old, and that played so smoothly.

What would be your build for late 2019, 2020?

So to start with I'd look at i7 CPUs, ones that can overclock since that's what you want to last the longest

Is it worth the paying the higher price for an i7? The benchmarks indicates the difference is not much higher than some i5

https://www.cpubenchmark.net/singleThread.html

If Intel keeps in line with their current bulls*** scheme of dropping hyperthreading from the i7, the future i5s may be a good buy if they have enough cores(8-10) to run majority of the newer games.
FD Meshify C | i7-9700K@5GHz | Z390 Aorus Master | 16GB Corsair 3200 | 1TB Samsung 970 EVO NVMe | Asus STRIX 2080 | EVGA G+ 850W
EVGA SC17 6820HK @ 3.7GHz
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