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  3. build pc with higher performance than you need?

User Info: MrDude1

MrDude1
1 month ago#1
this is a bit of a philosophical question on pc building. i will soon be able to afford a high end pc.

should you build a mid tier pc that is only good enough to play the games you want to play now in ultra high settings?

or should you future proof build a top tier pc good enough to play games 3 years in the future in ultra high settings as well as now?

i hear people say both. the old thinking that a high end pc can last you a long time and you wont have to build another pc for like 10 years. new thinking i heard is to get a mid tier pc and invest the rest of the money and have money to buy an even better pc in a few years.
Asus MX27AQ | Razer Ornata Chroma | Intel Core 2 Duo 2.8 Ghz E7400 | Zoltac GTX 1050 2GB VRAM | 4 GB DDR2 Mushkin RAM | BFGR550WGSPSU

User Info: Dave_rawkzorz

Dave_rawkzorz
1 month ago#2
Build what you can afford to build. High end rigs can last 5+ years so spending more gives you leeway to upgrade as time goes on or save to build the next one once your current rig becomes obsolete.

Budget builds eventually end up being a waste as they're normally not very upgradeable because the components used are cheap. MOBOs with only 2 DIMM slots, CPUs that don't have SMT/HT, PSUs that can't handle high TDP GPUs or not enough connections for mutiple storage, small SSDs that are only big enough for the OS + a few programs, etc.

Compare spending $800 every 2-3 years vs. spending 2200+ every 6+ years, but your experience during those 6 years will be more enjoyable using a better overall rig.
FD Meshify C | i7-9700K@5GHz | Z390 Aorus Master | 16GB Corsair 3200 | 1TB Samsung 970 EVO NVMe | Asus STRIX 2080 | EVGA G+ 850W
EVGA SC17 6820HK @ 3.7GHz

User Info: MrDude1

MrDude1
1 month ago#3
Dave_rawkzorz posted...
Build what you can afford to build. High end rigs can last 5+ years so spending more gives you leeway to upgrade as time goes on or save to build the next one once your current rig becomes obsolete.

Budget builds eventually end up being a waste as they're normally not very upgradeable because the components used are cheap. MOBOs with only 2 DIMM slots, CPUs that don't have SMT/HT, PSUs that can't handle high TDP GPUs or not enough connections for mutiple storage, small SSDs that are only big enough for the OS + a few programs, etc.

Compare spending $800 every 2-3 years vs. spending 2200+ every 6+ years, but your experience during those 6 years will be more enjoyable using a better overall rig.

thanks man. i have no interest in a budget build, but i am also not interested in spending the crazy money for a i9-9900k cpu, 64 gb ddr4 ram, 1000w psu, gtx 2080 ti. it's at least a mid tier for me, perhaps one with as much upgrade potential as possible.
Asus MX27AQ | Razer Ornata Chroma | Intel Core 2 Duo 2.8 Ghz E7400 | Zoltac GTX 1050 2GB VRAM | 4 GB DDR2 Mushkin RAM | BFGR550WGSPSU

User Info: thegreatsquare

thegreatsquare
1 month ago#4
CPU/GPU requirements jump with new console generations. The only real future-proofing that can be done is an AM4 [Ryzen] socket mobo. Of course, since the consoles are ~2 years off, you could go the "cheap route".

R3, 8-16GB 3000MHz or better, GTX 2060, ...console launch, R5/R7 upgrade, then GPU from new architecture that comes after consoles launch. Waiting until after consoles to upgrade gives you an idea of what you'll need. Allowing 2-~$300 GPU upgrades may be better than just one ~$600 upgrade up front, but on the CPU side, grabbing the right CPU upgrade the first time is probably the cheaper route. CPU requirements don't budge much after they jump with the console launch ...until the next console launch.

I do this for gaming laptops. My last one lasted 5yrs [...till when the PS4/XB1 launched] and my current one is now over 4yrs and is coasting to the next console launch.

https://www.notebookcheck.net/NVIDIA-GeForce-GTX-980M.126692.0.html
Give everyone enough guns and eventually we'll find out who we have to shoot to get some decent gun control.

User Info: ArkonBlade

ArkonBlade
1 month ago#5
Build what you can afford to spend on it.
I went all out 3.5 years ago.
My PC still does Ultra 1080p 60+ fps on every game I play.
If it wasnt for VR I wouldn't bother upgrading a thing for another 2-3 years.

PSN - ArkonBlade XBL - The Wolf Shadow STEAM - ArkonBlade

User Info: Shinkoden

Shinkoden
1 month ago#6
Try to not cheap out on it or go too expensive.

Best example I can give is my old PC I gave to a friend for us playing games at his place. It's from 2010 with a first generation I7, 12 GB Ram, has a SSD and had a couple GPU upgrades through the years and is still good to this day. It wasn't a mega expensive PC, but reasonable at close to $2000 at the time I got it.

User Info: kdognumba1

kdognumba1
1 month ago#7
I'd say, don't go for the lowest end stuff but also don't feel you need to break the bank going all out. In general, most game engines are pretty scalable but even the ones designed for the big publisher mainstream games that are made for console hardware aren't as demanding as you may think. For instance, the GTX 660ti which launched in 2012 and the i5 750 which launched in 2009 perform better then the hardware in the vanilla PS4 and XB1 which launched in 2013 and won't be obsolete until games start releasing using engines that are optimized for the PS5 and Xbox Scarlet's specs. Furthermore, neither of those were the bleeding edge when they released.

Granted, I'm sure PS5 and Xbox Scarlet will push the specs a bit more then their predecessors did but even then, going with a mid tier GPU and mid tier CPU should be fine. Just make sure you have enough storage and at least 16GB of RAM.
Ryzen 2400G | Radeon RX 590 | 16GB 3200 Mhz ; GPD Win
Also have a 60GB PS3, PS4 S, 360 S, XB1 S, Wii, Wii U, Switch, New 3DS XL, Vita, PSTV, Ouya, and DC

User Info: Conker

Conker
1 month ago#8
In the past few years it’s been safe to go a nice base of CPU, mobo, PSU, case in a build for years and upgrade the GPU as needed, and just add more or faster RAM, and upgrade the storage drive.

That’s the beauty of a custom build, parts can be upgraded as needed. Really the more essential piece like mobo/cpu should last quite a few years if you don’t go cheap. Even then, if they started bottlenecking your build, you could upgrade those parts by matching compatibility. Even if they required new RAM slots or something, you just hold off until you can do it efficiently.

Either way, I don’t see why you’d “need” to upgrade if you started off with solid parts. Obviously going cheap on something like a Pentium or something without an upgrade path would be stupid. Even if you did that, the mobo could likely give you a path to upgrade to an i5 or i7, etc. anyways.

There are many ways you can go, but it entirely depends on how often you’d care to upgrade and what you’re using it for.
If you don't want to argue about something, take the initiative and stfu.
Lets Go: Lions, Red Wings, Tigers, Pistons!

User Info: thegreatsquare

thegreatsquare
1 month ago#9
kdognumba1 posted...
Granted, I'm sure PS5 and Xbox Scarlet will push the specs a bit more then their predecessors did but even then, going with a mid tier GPU and mid tier CPU should be fine. Just make sure you have enough storage and at least 16GB of RAM.

The approximate CPU requirements for PS2-PS4 generation were P4 1.7GHz, C2D 2.4GHz, i5 2400. Next-Gen consoles using Ryzen, so it's probably going to be a larger than usual jump on the CPU side.
Give everyone enough guns and eventually we'll find out who we have to shoot to get some decent gun control.

User Info: TylerJ

TylerJ
1 month ago#10
MrDude1 posted...
Dave_rawkzorz posted...
Build what you can afford to build. High end rigs can last 5+ years so spending more gives you leeway to upgrade as time goes on or save to build the next one once your current rig becomes obsolete.

Budget builds eventually end up being a waste as they're normally not very upgradeable because the components used are cheap. MOBOs with only 2 DIMM slots, CPUs that don't have SMT/HT, PSUs that can't handle high TDP GPUs or not enough connections for mutiple storage, small SSDs that are only big enough for the OS + a few programs, etc.

Compare spending $800 every 2-3 years vs. spending 2200+ every 6+ years, but your experience during those 6 years will be more enjoyable using a better overall rig.

thanks man. i have no interest in a budget build, but i am also not interested in spending the crazy money for a i9-9900k cpu, 64 gb ddr4 ram, 1000w psu, gtx 2080 ti. it's at least a mid tier for me, perhaps one with as much upgrade potential as possible.


That sound reasonable. The main reason for getting slightly more than you need is to avoid the need to upgrade, as naturally sinking money into components you will soon replace is not good value for money. It also depends on the components - upgrading a GPU is simple, there's a good second hand market for your old unit too, so not buying the best GPU you can afford up front actually makes some sense. But motherboard/RAM/CPU can all be tied to generations - for example my PC is on an i7-4790k, any upgrade for me will require a new motherboard, CPU and RAM, which is basically a £500 investment for maybe 20% performance gain.

For you I'd suggest something like an 8700k/16GB RAM/RTX 2060, not the best components but good value for money and upgradable whilst still offering very high end results.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wScxZaWyL9A
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