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What a nightmare getting a NEW HDTV must be for the average consumer.

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  3. What a nightmare getting a NEW HDTV must be for the average consumer.

User Info: MASKOAAA

MASKOAAA
3 months ago#1
If you aren't a tech enthusiast new HDTV's must be a nightmare. I was over at the AVS Forums and in every thread pertaining to the model they bought its list after list of things that went wrong and work arounds to fix it MAYBE.......like really sit back for a second and think of the AVG consumer and how jarring HDR setup must be for them......oh your cable provider is doing 720p non HDR...But the built in app only does 1080p HDR on some shows....you'll also need to connect any HDR devices to port 4....ECT ECT...

This is the kind of headache I expect with PC Gaming not a TV lol.

User Info: jedinat

jedinat
3 months ago#2
You're sounding a lot like an average consumer right now bruh

User Info: Death_Born

Death_Born
3 months ago#3
The average consumer just hooks it up and doesn't care about the resolution or HDR. That's more of an enthusiast thing.

User Info: gideond

gideond
3 months ago#4
Death_Born posted...
The average consumer just hooks it up and doesn't care about the resolution or HDR. That's more of an enthusiast thing.

Yeah I'm going to assume the average consumer sees HDR on the box and thinks it's the latest and greatest tech and it's just automatically enabled and working when they hook up the TV. If they are paying for install it's still unlikely that your average Best Buy tech is going to take care of this setup either. Crutchfield might though.
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User Info: cugabuh

cugabuh
3 months ago#5
The average customer doesn't know what half these things are and if they weren't working they wouldn't even know it.

I can't tell you how many times I've seen parents watch standard def cable television on their fancy Samsung HDTVs they bought, and yet still brag about how great the picture quality is.

And every damn time I go over to my parents and turn off the truemotion soap opera effect they say 'looks the same to me still.'

User Info: ElDudorino

ElDudorino
3 months ago#6
cugabuh posted...
I can't tell you how many times I've seen parents watch standard def cable television on their fancy Samsung HDTVs they bought, and yet still brag about how great the picture quality is.

I had a friend get a high-end 4k TV, get it professionally calibrated, set up bias lighting and even convince his wife to let him paint the wall behind the TV gray, along with getting 7.1 speakers set up for Dolby Atmos, and he wanted to show off his setup to me. Then he found some videos online in 8k resolution and was like "Wait til you see 8k, it'll blow your mind." Then he played one of the videos on his 4k TV and I was thinking "Yeah, we're both still waiting to see 8k." This guy actually HAS put some time into looking up AV stuff and he still thought his TV would magically output a higher resolution than what it was rated for.

Anyway, yeah, setting up a TV and sound system properly is a lot harder than putting together a computer and it's often difficult to find proper resources on how to do it. I looked up a dozen guides on setting up ARC, most of them created by randos, before I gave up on it (though in the end I think it was a limitation of my receiver that was screwing it all up). And there's just so much misinformation out there. The advertised specs on HDTVs are almost complete BS. There are "high-end" video cables that cost way more and do nothing different from cheap ones. But then for audio cables I've read conflicting reports about whether high-end cables sound better or make any difference whatsoever, with both sides seeming convincing enough. It's just a minefield out there of incorrect or outdated information and outright lies. And even when I find somebody who's learned how to navigate it, I still doubt a lot of the things they say because AV enthusiasts are often quite weird, make really grandiose claims and are frequently proved to be full of crap.

But since most people can just take home any random TV, convince themselves it looks good no matter how it's set up, and go on happily with their lives, I guess it all works out most of the time.

User Info: SinisterSlay

SinisterSlay
3 months ago#7
I still wonder what professionally calibrated actually means or does. Like are they opening up the back of the tv and turning some 70s style knobs with mini screwdrivers while watching the screen with a piece of paper showing each colour?
He who stumbles around in darkness with a stick is blind. But he who... sticks out in darkness... is... fluorescent! - Brother Silence

User Info: MASKOAAA

MASKOAAA
3 months ago#8
SinisterSlay posted...
I still wonder what professionally calibrated actually means or does. Like are they opening up the back of the tv and turning some 70s style knobs with mini screwdrivers while watching the screen with a piece of paper showing each colour?


It means accuracy of the image since media is calibrated to a certain spec in editing. For instance why would you buy a 3k dollar display just to put it on a preset vivid mode....Could of saved a ton of money

User Info: SinisterSlay

SinisterSlay
3 months ago#9
MASKOAAA posted...
SinisterSlay posted...
I still wonder what professionally calibrated actually means or does. Like are they opening up the back of the tv and turning some 70s style knobs with mini screwdrivers while watching the screen with a piece of paper showing each colour?


It means accuracy of the image since media is calibrated to a certain spec in editing. For instance why would you buy a 3k dollar display just to put it on a preset vivid mode....Could of saved a ton of money

Why don't they"calibrate" it at the factory then before it's sent out.
But anyways, so calibrating really is literally playing with the color slider until they think it looks right?
He who stumbles around in darkness with a stick is blind. But he who... sticks out in darkness... is... fluorescent! - Brother Silence

User Info: ElDudorino

ElDudorino
3 months ago#10
SinisterSlay posted...
Why don't they"calibrate" it at the factory then before it's sent out.

For one thing, proper calibration takes the room the TV is in into account. Beyond that, it's presumably a cost thing; when you're cranking TVs out nonstop, why spend more time (money) tweaking settings that the average consumer won't even know about?

SinisterSlay posted...
But anyways, so calibrating really is literally playing with the color slider until they think it looks right?

They use tools to measure the display during setup in a way that the eye could not. Also, I've read that some changes are done through a service menu that you won't find by just going into your TV's options menu.

I've seen some calibrated TVs that look outstanding, but then again the type of person who pays for proper calibration probably already shelled out money for a particularly high-quality TV in the first place so there are a few factors to take into account. My last TV was very high-end but my current one is midrange and so I certainly can't use it as a basis for comparison.
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