This is a split board - You can return to the Split List for other boards.

How the F do I "get gud" at StarCraft II

  • Topic Archived
You're browsing the GameFAQs Message Boards as a guest. Sign Up for free (or Log In if you already have an account) to be able to post messages, change how messages are displayed, and view media in posts.
  1. Boards
  2. PC
  3. How the F do I "get gud" at StarCraft II

User Info: PhazonReborn

PhazonReborn
4 months ago#11
It seems the game is less about actual strategy and more about hotkeys, speed and more speed.
The Phazon you know and trust since 2004

User Info: Terantatek

Terantatek
4 months ago#12
PhazonReborn posted...
It seems the game is less about actual strategy and more about hotkeys, speed and more speed.


That's why I only play casual against AI on it.
https://pcpartpicker.com/list/Xgsy6X
i7 7700k @ 4.6ghz | Asus ROG Strix 1080TI OC | Ripjaws 16GB 3000mhz | Noctua NH-D15 | Asus Swift PG278QR

User Info: vlado_e

vlado_e
4 months ago#13
Mr kitty posted...

PC gamers in general, prefer to use the term skill rather than using the proper term which is learning curve & it's misleading.

Probably because you don't seem to understand it.

Mr kitty posted...
It's more about learning the learning curve.

What you said is pretty much nonsense. One doesn't "learn" the learning curve. In fact, one doesn't interact with a learning curve directly. A learning curve is just a representation of how hard something is to grasp, say, if you plot how long it takes to memorize numbers of different length, then the resulting graph is the said curve.

In more casual context learning curve refers to how hard or easy something is to learn, so if something is referred to having a "steep" or "high" learning curve, then it takes more time and effort to understand it, as opposed to "low" learning curve which is simpler.

Skill is entirely different to learning curve - it's the efficiency of how you do something. The learning curve may show you how easy or hard is to get the skill or perhaps how easy or hard is to start versus achieve mastery - if, for example, it's harder to begin with but later on it's easy or vice versa. However, the two can't really be used interchangeably, nor confused for one another.
We do what we must / because we can. / For the good of all of us. / Except the ones who are dead.

User Info: juscallmeehx

juscallmeehx
4 months ago#14
Worry about your Macro. Don't worry about your Micro. I find people new to the game or are just not very good aren't very good at their macro. You need to optimize how much gathering you do.
It's not the hardware in your hands that matters, but the software in your hearts.

User Info: GTL581

GTL581
4 months ago#15
PhazonReborn posted...
It seems the game is less about actual strategy and more about hotkeys, speed and more speed.

Don't forget the deathball race. Unless they fixed that, haven't played sc2 online in years

User Info: PhazonReborn

PhazonReborn
4 months ago#16
GTL581 posted...
PhazonReborn posted...
It seems the game is less about actual strategy and more about hotkeys, speed and more speed.

Don't forget the deathball race. Unless they fixed that, haven't played sc2 online in years

I dunno what you mean. Do you mean the gigantic mass of units that people online send to my vase after 12 minutes of elapsed time?
The Phazon you know and trust since 2004

User Info: UnderwaterAir

UnderwaterAir
4 months ago#17
Pitlord_Special posted...
They designed SC2 for esports APM monkeys so you basically just have to practice with the shortcuts and interface constantly until you can play faster and execute a strategy/build with fewer delays and mistakes.


Not even remotely true.
To be successful at SC2 requires so much less APM than SC1:BW.

You can beat AI and achieve low gold/high silver ranking in SC2 with ~45 APM so long as you know what you're doing.

My cousin did it. My friend did it.

Also, executing a build flawlessly doesn't help a whole lot. If you want to play at the higher levels you have to learn to scout, how to read your opponent, and how to adjust your current strategy to account for the opponent's. Along with map awareness, reaction speed, microing, and all while macroing. But yeah, that's all if you want to "git gud."

If you want to just beat AI and win sometimes in bronze and maybe touch on silver a bit, you can do it with APM. You can do it within a month of playing so long as you're directing your path of improvement rather than just spamming 5000 games and doing the same thing over and over. You have to actively do better and improve. From never having played the game to beating the AI that's literally two weeks of casual playing, tops.

User Info: juscallmeehx

juscallmeehx
4 months ago#18
UnderwaterAir posted...
Pitlord_Special posted...
They designed SC2 for esports APM monkeys so you basically just have to practice with the shortcuts and interface constantly until you can play faster and execute a strategy/build with fewer delays and mistakes.


Not even remotely true.
To be successful at SC2 requires so much less APM than SC1:BW.

You can beat AI and achieve low gold/high silver ranking in SC2 with ~45 APM so long as you know what you're doing.

My cousin did it. My friend did it.

Also, executing a build flawlessly doesn't help a whole lot. If you want to play at the higher levels you have to learn to scout, how to read your opponent, and how to adjust your current strategy to account for the opponent's. Along with map awareness, reaction speed, microing, and all while macroing. But yeah, that's all if you want to "git gud."

If you want to just beat AI and win sometimes in bronze and maybe touch on silver a bit, you can do it with APM. You can do it within a month of playing so long as you're directing your path of improvement rather than just spamming 5000 games and doing the same thing over and over. You have to actively do better and improve. From never having played the game to beating the AI that's literally two weeks of casual playing, tops.


Exactly.

However, if you want to get out of the lower leagues, it's all about your macro economy. Lower leagues tend to bottle neck themselves like a lot and it usually ends up with the one with the better economy to win. Often times, they just build and after ~10 minutes, they fight and the one with the best economy wins.

That being said, in the higher leagues, while Macro is important, micro is just as important, if not more, which does include scouting, harassing, countering etc. Lower leagues tend to not do that and is not too important in the lower leagues.

Judging by TC, it would help if he just focuses on Macro: building a very strong economy.
It's not the hardware in your hands that matters, but the software in your hearts.

User Info: Mr kitty

Mr kitty
4 months ago#19
vlado_e posted...
Mr kitty posted...

PC gamers in general, prefer to use the term skill rather than using the proper term which is learning curve & it's misleading.

Probably because you don't seem to understand it.

I understand it well. It's either you know or don't know in most cases
vlado_e posted...

Mr kitty posted...
It's more about learning the learning curve.

What you said is pretty much nonsense. One doesn't "learn" the learning curve. In fact, one doesn't interact with a learning curve directly. A learning curve is just a representation of how hard something is to grasp, say, if you plot how long it takes to memorize numbers of different length, then the resulting graph is the said curve.

In more casual context learning curve refers to how hard or easy something is to learn, so if something is referred to having a "steep" or "high" learning curve, then it takes more time and effort to understand it, as opposed to "low" learning curve which is simpler.

Skill is entirely different to learning curve - it's the efficiency of how you do something. The learning curve may show you how easy or hard is to get the skill or perhaps how easy or hard is to start versus achieve mastery - if, for example, it's harder to begin with but later on it's easy or vice versa. However, the two can't really be used interchangeably, nor confused for one another.

https://i.stack.imgur.com/6TubF.png
https://www.youtube.com/user/MrDeapGamingMedia

User Info: vlado_e

vlado_e
4 months ago#20
Mr kitty posted...
https://i.stack.imgur.com/6TubF.png


That is what a learning curve is. For what, I don't know. I also don't think it applies to SC2. The fact remains that it's not something you "learn" - it describes how you learn something. In this case it shows a gentle start and then a steep climb to mastery. It isn't, however, something the player directly interacts with.
We do what we must / because we can. / For the good of all of us. / Except the ones who are dead.
  1. Boards
  2. PC
  3. How the F do I "get gud" at StarCraft II

Report Message

Terms of Use Violations:

Etiquette Issues:

Notes (optional; required for "Other"):
Add user to Ignore List after reporting

Topic Sticky

You are not allowed to request a sticky.

  • Topic Archived