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Your Experience with Non-Techies

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User Info: GeminiX7

GeminiX7
4 months ago#41
I'm in IT, so most people I deal with are more or less non-techies. I actually prefer the "my computer is a box filled with chips and pixie dust that spits out cat videos and porn" to the "I put a few color coded components together to make a gaming rig, I think I know alittle bit more about network engineering/software development than you" types. When you don't know anything it's easier for you to accept someone's recommendations/cautions. You wouldn't believe how many PC gamers make easy to fix mistakes/issues infinitely harder because they think changing graphics cards and knowing what a router is means they know more about setting up firewalls or dealing with load balancing than the people being paid to work on those tasks.
MSI Z97| Intel i5-4690 @ 3.5 Ghz | 8GB Cosair Vengence @ 1600 |Radeon R9 390 8GB
Who gave you permission to talk to me, mongrel?

User Info: nominturddaddy

nominturddaddy
4 months ago#42
GeminiX7 posted...
I'm in IT, so most people I deal with are more or less non-techies. I actually prefer the "my computer is a box filled with chips and pixie dust that spits out cat videos and porn" to the "I put a few color coded components together to make a gaming rig, I think I know alittle bit more about network engineering/software development than you" types. When you don't know anything it's easier for you to accept someone's recommendations/cautions. You wouldn't believe how many PC gamers make easy to fix mistakes/issues infinitely harder because they think changing graphics cards and knowing what a router is means they know more about setting up firewalls or dealing with load balancing than the people being paid to work on those tasks.


The last time I had a professional work on my computer, they returned it in a worse state than I had dropped it off in, because they forgot to plug some things in and were too lazy to open it back up and plug it back in before calling me to say it was ready. They didn't resolve the issue, either - there was a noise I was hearing that they couldn't hear (I know there are tools to measure this, so they were just too lazy to use the tools and literally went by their ears, which were deaf in that range in comparison to mine so couldn't hear it at all so no issue don't even bother using tools to test), so I took it back a couple months later when the noise was louder so they would easily be able to hear it, then once they fixed it I connected what ended up being done to resolve the issue back to the first time I dropped it off when they had been unable to even diagnose the very thing I had diagnosed it as having when I had first dropped it off, because they were too lazy to use their tools, and by the way, they were too lazy to plug certain things back in as well.

They gave me a pretty decent cash apology.

I don't know a lot about computers. But you don't need to. It isn't like I'm making the software or manufacturing the hardware. Anything anyone else has been able to do for me professionally as far as support goes, I've been able to do on my own. Google has only made it easier - things I forget, I can read step 1 and go "oh right" and back to it. The only reason I need other people is because unfortunately, I need to deal with the telephone game when doing RMAs, and that's where the real headache comes in. The only reason to use tech support in this day and age is to have someone else do it so you can spend your time doing something else, but unfortunately, other people confound things more often than not, and end up wasting more time and money than if you had done the tech support yourself. Barring RMAs, the real headache of all this.
My current setup: https://i.imgur.com/c8xbRW0.png
Some of my gamer cred: https://i.imgur.com/q7RXULk.png

User Info: nominturddaddy

nominturddaddy
4 months ago#43
I've been on the burn side of providing tech support for people who don't know and blame you for all the problems down the line just because they need someone to blame that isn't them, even though logic says to give you some space because they've had it for an extended period of time since you solved all their prior problems and the new ones are actually new and unrelated, so I get the whole picture. The sad fact is that the tech realm is a f***ing piece of s*** headache to get involved in.
My current setup: https://i.imgur.com/c8xbRW0.png
Some of my gamer cred: https://i.imgur.com/q7RXULk.png

User Info: Monkeymage

Monkeymage
4 months ago#44
mucloud posted...
nominturddaddy posted...
iemerg_ posted...
Monkeymage posted...
Years ago I made the mistake of putting up a sign in the break room where I work, saying that I would fix peoples' computers and mobile devices for a fee.

Most of it was people shoving 5 and 6 year old prebuilts onto me asking why they were running slow, and then having to clear tons of spyware, adware, etc off of them. I would provide education on what sites to avoid and they would bring them back 6 months later with exactly the same problem. It got real tiresome.


that sounds like easy profit, i wouldnt complain about that at all lol


I'm confused as well. "Stop bringing me your computer problems, I'm trying to run a PC solutions business here"?

What he should have done was the estimates are free but the work is $20 hr.


Yeah I priced myself out of it. The estimates were free but I made the mistake of charging a flat fee. I had like 5 or 6 repeat customers where I would need to spend 2 or 3 hours fixing their crap and I only charged them like $20-30, so it just wasn't worth it.
Intel i9 9250k Crystal Palace OC'ed to 8.5 Ghz / 128GB TDR4 RAM / GTX Titan 6 GO500 "Oppenheimer" Chipset, Icosa-SLI
http://i.imgur.com/pniS1hj.jpg

User Info: nominturddaddy

nominturddaddy
4 months ago#45
It all comes together but in the end, it doesn't even matter.
My current setup: https://i.imgur.com/c8xbRW0.png
Some of my gamer cred: https://i.imgur.com/q7RXULk.png

User Info: xcmon3yx2

xcmon3yx2
4 months ago#46
MasterFeeler posted...
If you put an AMD CPU and Nvidia GPU, the computer will slow down. WTF.

put a AMD in anything and it will slow down
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCaaOiM_Sk560HEVNYpsA7Og
Check out my let's play channel

User Info: darkmaian23

darkmaian23
4 months ago#47
Most of my experiences have been horrible. People think computers are magic, and if you claim to know something about them, you must be magic too. Namely:
1. Someone asks a question, but it's too vague to be understood yet they expect you to understand what they mean and give them easy to follow steps. Example: "A box keeps popping up on my screen. What do I do?" "What does the box say?" "Oh I don't know I'm too busy to check. What do I do?"

2. Someone buys bargain bin junk and assumes it's slow because of a problem someone technical can fix. Before the Amazon Fire came out and the market was flooded with low cost garbage tablets that couldn't do anything this one was super common. Before that, it used to happen a lot with used laptops. No matter how obviously old and outdated a thing was, you always lost points and favor when you couldn't magically "fix" it.

3. You get a problem read off to you with a request to describe how to fix it, but aren't allowed to see what they are seeing or point anything out. Apparently, if you really "know computers" you should be able to visualize both a user's current situation and where everything is in the menus without actually seeing it.

4. You get handed an ancient laptop infested with so much malware it barely boots, but the user wants her laptop back running like new with everything exactly the way she left it. And of course, she has none of the licenses or codes for the software on the machine (so no wiping the machine). I saw one case where I didn't even want to try saving any of the user's files using Linux and a USB stick.

@Orestes417
My experience differs from yours considerably. Even if a mildly technical user thinks they know better than you, they can at least follow what you are saying. No matter how professional or patient I was, I always got accused of not being a good listener, not being patient enough (maybe because I shorten steps on the 5th or 6th request for the same explanation from the same person?), or of messing something up the next time they have a problem. A number of times when I worked on a computer, the person would come back as long as a month or two later with some different problem wanting to claim that I somehow messed something up.

I saw all these things happen to other people doing the same kind of work when it was my job, so I'm pretty sure it wasn't me.

User Info: Interfusor

Interfusor
4 months ago#48
I don't know what the f*** this topic is about but can anyone tell me how to send an email with my Underwood typewriter?
I am not economically viable.

User Info: Orestes417

Orestes417
4 months ago#49
Give me a true blank slate and I can teach them wizardry. Or if not wizadry, at least how to get what they want to get done to the extent it's possible to do. Give me someone who's been corrupted by bad habits habits though and it gets 100 times harder. The more there is to unlearn the worse it gets. The absolute worst is when you have an "expert" user on one piece of software trying to force a different one to do what they mean because they're so stuck in their workflow.
When nothing remains everything becomes possible.

User Info: GeminiX7

GeminiX7
4 months ago#50
nominturddaddy posted...
GeminiX7 posted...
I'm in IT, so most people I deal with are more or less non-techies. I actually prefer the "my computer is a box filled with chips and pixie dust that spits out cat videos and porn" to the "I put a few color coded components together to make a gaming rig, I think I know alittle bit more about network engineering/software development than you" types. When you don't know anything it's easier for you to accept someone's recommendations/cautions. You wouldn't believe how many PC gamers make easy to fix mistakes/issues infinitely harder because they think changing graphics cards and knowing what a router is means they know more about setting up firewalls or dealing with load balancing than the people being paid to work on those tasks.


The last time I had a professional work on my computer, they returned it in a worse state than I had dropped it off in, because they forgot to plug some things in and were too lazy to open it back up and plug it back in before calling me to say it was ready. They didn't resolve the issue, either - there was a noise I was hearing that they couldn't hear (I know there are tools to measure this, so they were just too lazy to use the tools and literally went by their ears, which were deaf in that range in comparison to mine so couldn't hear it at all so no issue don't even bother using tools to test), so I took it back a couple months later when the noise was louder so they would easily be able to hear it, then once they fixed it I connected what ended up being done to resolve the issue back to the first time I dropped it off when they had been unable to even diagnose the very thing I had diagnosed it as having when I had first dropped it off, because they were too lazy to use their tools, and by the way, they were too lazy to plug certain things back in as well.

They gave me a pretty decent cash apology.

I don't know a lot about computers. But you don't need to. It isn't like I'm making the software or manufacturing the hardware. Anything anyone else has been able to do for me professionally as far as support goes, I've been able to do on my own. Google has only made it easier - things I forget, I can read step 1 and go "oh right" and back to it. The only reason I need other people is because unfortunately, I need to deal with the telephone game when doing RMAs, and that's where the real headache comes in. The only reason to use tech support in this day and age is to have someone else do it so you can spend your time doing something else, but unfortunately, other people confound things more often than not, and end up wasting more time and money than if you had done the tech support yourself. Barring RMAs, the real headache of all this.


I was actually talking more about internal support. I currently work with a college providing network support and maitenance for thier Achitecture and Design school. What I was referring to was when I worked for a cloud computing company. We'd have some people we'd deal with who had no understanding of computers and were usually pretty agreeable, but we also had a large number of self-proclaimed "nerds and gamers", who made it very clear that they knew more about PCs and network devices than the average joe, but not in any way that actually matters in a professional sense, and it could be pretty grating to fix problems.

It's like being a mechanic, and being second-guessed constantly by someone simply because they think knowing how to change your oil and install new brake lights makes them a mechanical engineer.
MSI Z97| Intel i5-4690 @ 3.5 Ghz | 8GB Cosair Vengence @ 1600 |Radeon R9 390 8GB
Who gave you permission to talk to me, mongrel?
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