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Guess what's even worse than the FBI wanting your browsing history?

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User Info: DarkZV2Beta

DarkZV2Beta
1 year ago#31
Voidgolem posted...
DarkZV2Beta posted...

You're making a lot of assumptions to win an "internet fight" that never even started.
I think I hit the nail on the head there.


and you're making a lot of effort to say that you have a constitutional right to not contract malware when doing illegal s***.

Care to explain otherwise?


I never implied anything remotely close to that. You made that up to feel good about yourself by "winning" on the internet.
http://goo.gl/mdpAMo The cutest Lovecraftian horror you'll ever see.
a quad core i7 was just a rebranded celeron -Pengu1n

User Info: Demon27248

Demon27248
1 year ago#32
Voidgolem posted...

Demon27248 posted...

Sure, it's easy to say that the people affected by it deserved it, but we have laws for a reason. They're here to protect our rights, & the only alternative is a system where whatever the person who's in charge says goes. The people who were arrested through the investigation have all committed crimes but that doesn't justify the crimes committed upon them.


The crime where they said "Yes I want to allow this program access to my machine and the internet".

Sorry laws don't exist to protect criminals from their own stupidity.


They never agreed to that though! The malware performed the searches covertly. I suggest you research what malware actually is before you try to argue that remotely accessing someone's computer with it is lawful.

And everyone is innocent until proven guilty, so the criminals were lawful citizens at the point in time their computers were searched.
| Xbox | Xbox 360 | PS3 | Alienware Alpha i5 | Dreamcast | PSP-2000 |
| XLink Kai: Demon27248 | PSN: ltltltlt | Steam: Demon27248 |

User Info: Voidgolem

Voidgolem
1 year ago#33
DarkZV2Beta posted...


I never implied anything remotely close to that. You made that up to feel good about yourself by "winning" on the internet.


Then you never read any other posts in the topic and decided to post about irrelevant bulls***.

Congrats bro.
http://i.imgur.com/ZNpLR0T.png

User Info: DarkZV2Beta

DarkZV2Beta
1 year ago#34
Voidgolem posted...
DarkZV2Beta posted...


I never implied anything remotely close to that. You made that up to feel good about yourself by "winning" on the internet.


Then you never read any other posts in the topic and decided to post about irrelevant bulls***.

Congrats bro.


And you jumped on it without thinking, proving my point.
http://goo.gl/mdpAMo The cutest Lovecraftian horror you'll ever see.
a quad core i7 was just a rebranded celeron -Pengu1n

User Info: Voidgolem

Voidgolem
1 year ago#35
Demon27248 posted...


They never agreed to that though! The malware performed the searches covertly. I suggest you research what malware actually is before you try to argue that remotely accessing someone's computer with it is lawful.

And everyone is innocent until proven guilty, so the criminals were lawful citizens at the point in time their computers were searched.


They downloaded s*** off the internet and said yes.

You could try to argue that the s*** didn't list off everything it does before saying yes. At which point I would point out that a drug bust guy rarely announces that he's a cop.

Come back with an example where you could contract this by innocuous means or unsolicited and then I would agree that it's a problem.
http://i.imgur.com/ZNpLR0T.png

User Info: Voidgolem

Voidgolem
1 year ago#36
DarkZV2Beta posted...

And you jumped on it without thinking, proving my point.


That your point is irrelevant bulls***?

'kay, thanks.
http://i.imgur.com/ZNpLR0T.png

User Info: Demon27248

Demon27248
1 year ago#37
Voidgolem posted...
Demon27248 posted...


They never agreed to that though! The malware performed the searches covertly. I suggest you research what malware actually is before you try to argue that remotely accessing someone's computer with it is lawful.

And everyone is innocent until proven guilty, so the criminals were lawful citizens at the point in time their computers were searched.


They downloaded s*** off the internet and said yes.

You could try to argue that the s*** didn't list off everything it does before saying yes. At which point I would point out that a drug bust guy rarely announces that he's a cop.


So you're saying that when the words 'yes' come out of your mouth (our you click on it in a pop up box), the police gain the right to do whatever the f*** they want to you? Is that a special code word for us giving up all of our rights?

Also in a drug bust, after the cop witnesses the person buying the drugs, they also don't immediately gain the right to search all of their property.
| Xbox | Xbox 360 | PS3 | Alienware Alpha i5 | Dreamcast | PSP-2000 |
| XLink Kai: Demon27248 | PSN: ltltltlt | Steam: Demon27248 |

User Info: Voidgolem

Voidgolem
1 year ago#38
Demon27248 posted...


So you're saying that when the words 'yes' come out of your mouth (our you click on it in a pop up box), the police gain the right to do whatever the f*** they want to you? Is that a special code word for us giving up all of our rights?

Also in a drug bust, after the cop witnesses the person buying the drugs, they also don't immediately gain the right to search all of their property.


I'm saying when you give implicit permission to a program to do whatever it likes, you lose the ability to complain when it does whatever it likes. You did the equivalent of saying "Sure, come in and take a look around".

I must've missed when "The files on your computer after establishing probable cause and reason to look (because this was downloaded from a child porn site)" were equivalent to "All of your property".

Again: Get an example where you contract this through innocuous means or without solicitation and I would agree that it's a problem. There's no reason for them to have just random access to your PC whenever they want.

The difference is: This was not random access.

~

Furthermore, re-reading the article, it doesn't look like the so-called "Malware" did all that much beyond obtain the information that people supply to -literally any given website they access- in the first place: MAC Address, browser metadata, and the like. That's no more an illegal access than what you supply to this very webpage every time you visit. Difference being the end server here is managed by Gamespot (I guess? *shrug*) and not the FBI.

Wouldn't even need to ask permission for that. That's just how TCP/IP works. You might as well say that telling somebody else "Hi I'm <name here>" is illegal.
http://i.imgur.com/ZNpLR0T.png

User Info: DarkZV2Beta

DarkZV2Beta
1 year ago#39
Voidgolem posted...
DarkZV2Beta posted...

And you jumped on it without thinking, proving my point.


That your point is irrelevant bulls***?

'kay, thanks.

That you're way too into this.
http://goo.gl/mdpAMo The cutest Lovecraftian horror you'll ever see.
a quad core i7 was just a rebranded celeron -Pengu1n

User Info: Voidgolem

Voidgolem
1 year ago#40
DarkZV2Beta posted...

That you're way too into this.


saying that I'm way too into calling alarmist idiots what they are accomplishes...what, exactly?

Other than being irrelevant bulls***.
http://i.imgur.com/ZNpLR0T.png
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