• Post New Message
You're browsing the GameFAQs Message Boards as a guest. Sign Up for free (or Log In if you already have an account) to be able to post messages, change how messages are displayed, and view media in posts.
  1. Boards
  2. Persona 5
  3. What do you actually like about this game?

User Info: Dark Symphony

Dark Symphony
2 months ago#1
I bought this game on someone's recommendation even though it didn't look like my cup of tea. I played the Persona 4 fighting game and those characters look a lot more congruous with something I could enjoy... maybe. I eventually bought the Golden Edition of 4 but haven't played it mainly because I got 5 first and was giving it a chance.

Now fanboys -- they often say people just don't understand a game in order to defend that game from criticism they don't have a good answer for. I've seen it 10,000 times.

But THIS game: This is the first time I can think of where I just don't flip-floppin' get it.

I don't get it. The characters go over my head. I can't understand the attraction to a lot of the characters on a visual or personality level. The designs of 5 seem to very much reflect a lot of the shifts in style of a lot of these kinds of games lately. I've never seen it so starkly represented. The cat thing I don't get. A lot of the girls I don't get. The blonde comic-relief buddy looks decent and I can kind asee him in some other franchise I'd enjoy. The main character is the biggest mystery to me. Not so much because he's offensive but because he seems so popular and I honestly, listen to me when I say this, I honestly have no idea why. Is it because he embodies the franchise and that's why people go nuts when he shows up in Smash Brothers or something?

It's not just the characters. I've slogged through many games with crap I didn't care about because of gameplay. A lot of Japanese games have gameplay styles I like and this one seemed to... until I saw it was all about going into people's minds and altering some fake world stuff. That was kind of a let down. And the limited opportunities for combat that I found in the first 7 or 8 hours really wore me thin.

The stylization seems overdone as well. I actually like a lot of it when taken in individually but sometimes it seems like layers of style is caked on to the point of seeming... desperate isn't the right word. Too derisive. Maybe it's too insular? Some of the motif and artistic decisions seem like maybe I need to be a longtime fan. Maybe all these layers exist because a lot of it is old hat and to long time fans there's only one or two new players of stuff caked on to the presentation?

The gameflow... OK, I get that there's some kind of slice-of-life social sim element to the game. From what I played it seemed like I was just being zipped a long watching people talk and making a bunch of inconsequential choices rather than actually participating. Getting Tifa or Lulu to like you in Final Fantasy 7 or 10 seemed to be more in-depth as far as strategizing relationships than what I encountered in this game. Do I need to give it more time?

You may want to think this is just straight hate AKA Strate but it isn't. When I learned of Persona 5 Strikers I thought "You know, this may just cut through all of the fat and get me to the meat and potatoes of the game." I booted it up, got to fight some guys right away (yes!) in a small arena (ugh) and then it was... a bunch of running around and talking to people and watching text messages pop up back and forth between the characters on the screen. What the? It was late and I was trying to rush through to get to more combat but I just gave up eventually.

The worst part? The underlying story that I've seen so far in Persona 5 was legitimately intriguing. I almost couldn't admit it to myself. I wanted to see what was going on with it and the game was getting in my way it seemed. That's when I knew I really didn't understand this game.

A lot of people love it. What makes it good?

User Info: GerinTheFox

GerinTheFox
2 months ago#2
Firstly I like the fusion system if handled correctly you can get Personas who take hardly any damage and absorb all other types. Tho takes both time and patience. Save and reload job when using Sacrificial function.
Secondly as the anniversary game it reused aspects that were dropped for 3 and 4.
Thirdly the story will seriously get you hooked if you let it.
Lastly tho they can be a pain the Social Links are there to help reduce the level grinding and when maxxed out provide items to speed their progress in New Game Plus.
May all of the great RPGs get sequels still awaiting Vagrant Story II
GerinKitsune

User Info: Dark Symphony

Dark Symphony
2 months ago#3
GerinTheFox posted...
Firstly I like the fusion system if handled correctly you can get Personas who take hardly any damage and absorb all other types. Tho takes both time and patience. Save and reload job when using Sacrificial function.
Secondly as the anniversary game it reused aspects that were dropped for 3 and 4.
Thirdly the story will seriously get you hooked if you let it.
Lastly tho they can be a pain the Social Links are there to help reduce the level grinding and when maxxed out provide items to speed their progress in New Game Plus.


See that all doesn't sound so bad. I guess I have to just give it more time(?) The game definitely has a kind of anniversary feel to it. Like there's a lot of nodding that I'm not getting because I haven't played the others.

User Info: DylanYoshi

DylanYoshi
2 months ago#4
The story of this game has two primary appeals to me (on a broad level, there's plenty of more specific things I love about it too) , one of which reflects the whole series and the other which reflects this game in particular.

The first are the psychological themes. Delving into people's minds, seeing their dark sides, and watching the main characters embrace different personas to fend off their real world problems is a fascinating concept to me. The series is based all around Carl Jung's ideas and giving them fantastical forms. This theme is really interesting and gives the plot a lot of cool moments.

The second, which relates to this game in particular, is the Phantom Thief motif. If you're unfamiliar with the Gentleman Thief/Phantom Thief genre, you might not get as much out of this game as those of us who are big fans of it (Lupin III, for example, is one of my favorite anime franchises and it definitely had some influence here). The idea here is that this game is a huge homage to the genre. The plot is less about figuring out a central mystery and more about the intrigue of how the characters will achieve their goals.

This is also why the style is so appealing. The game is stylized to make everything seem rebellious and classy, just like a gentleman thief is. The style exists to make this story about cocky criminals feel exactly like it should- You have text that looks like magazine letters cut out, you have a UI that zips around as though it's stealthily moving between cover points (like how the HP gauge transitions when you change from overworld to battle), you have the characters striking stylish poses when they kill an enemy with a finishing move, etc. Everything about it is meant to make you feel like you're this underdog criminal that the corrupt members of society are constantly underestimating. Even the music reflects this idea.

The gameplay being focused on hitting weaknesses but also conserving SP so that you can get done with dungeons in as few in-game days as possible. I do think it's a bit too easy (particularly after the first dungeon, the first dungeon is reasonably challenging), but I do think it's satisfying to kill as many enemies as possible and then shake down the last one for money, or even just to successfully knock down all the enemies in a creative way and finish them with an all out attack.

Besides that, the gameplay also perfectly captures the feeling of being that aforementioned cocky phantom thief. Zipping from cover to cover, waiting for the moment to strike an enemy, and finishing them before they even get a chance to attack feels fantastic. Then when you get to the boss battles, they typically have sections that show the characters using their ingenuity rather than their raw power to win fights- Such as sending one member out to sneakily disrupt the enemy while your party distracts them in battle. There's a lot of stuff like this that I really adore.

User Info: SheenavsKilley

SheenavsKilley
2 months ago#5
Game is only worth 1 playthrough. Even the music never changes and puzzles are disappointing.

User Info: Asis

Asis
2 months ago#6
Dark Symphony posted...
I bought this game on someone's recommendation even though it didn't look like my cup of tea. I played the Persona 4 fighting game and those characters look a lot more congruous with something I could enjoy... maybe. I eventually bought the Golden Edition of 4 but haven't played it mainly because I got 5 first and was giving it a chance.

Now fanboys -- they often say people just don't understand a game in order to defend that game from criticism they don't have a good answer for. I've seen it 10,000 times.

But THIS game: This is the first time I can think of where I just don't flip-floppin' get it.

I don't get it. The characters go over my head. I can't understand the attraction to a lot of the characters on a visual or personality level. The designs of 5 seem to very much reflect a lot of the shifts in style of a lot of these kinds of games lately. I've never seen it so starkly represented. The cat thing I don't get. A lot of the girls I don't get. The blonde comic-relief buddy looks decent and I can kind asee him in some other franchise I'd enjoy. The main character is the biggest mystery to me. Not so much because he's offensive but because he seems so popular and I honestly, listen to me when I say this, I honestly have no idea why. Is it because he embodies the franchise and that's why people go nuts when he shows up in Smash Brothers or something?

It's not just the characters. I've slogged through many games with crap I didn't care about because of gameplay. A lot of Japanese games have gameplay styles I like and this one seemed to... until I saw it was all about going into people's minds and altering some fake world stuff. That was kind of a let down. And the limited opportunities for combat that I found in the first 7 or 8 hours really wore me thin.

The stylization seems overdone as well. I actually like a lot of it when taken in individually but sometimes it seems like layers of style is caked on to the point of seeming... desperate isn't the right word. Too derisive. Maybe it's too insular? Some of the motif and artistic decisions seem like maybe I need to be a longtime fan. Maybe all these layers exist because a lot of it is old hat and to long time fans there's only one or two new players of stuff caked on to the presentation?

The gameflow... OK, I get that there's some kind of slice-of-life social sim element to the game. From what I played it seemed like I was just being zipped a long watching people talk and making a bunch of inconsequential choices rather than actually participating. Getting Tifa or Lulu to like you in Final Fantasy 7 or 10 seemed to be more in-depth as far as strategizing relationships than what I encountered in this game. Do I need to give it more time?

You may want to think this is just straight hate AKA Strate but it isn't. When I learned of Persona 5 Strikers I thought "You know, this may just cut through all of the fat and get me to the meat and potatoes of the game." I booted it up, got to fight some guys right away (yes!) in a small arena (ugh) and then it was... a bunch of running around and talking to people and watching text messages pop up back and forth between the characters on the screen. What the? It was late and I was trying to rush through to get to more combat but I just gave up eventually.

The worst part? The underlying story that I've seen so far in Persona 5 was legitimately intriguing. I almost couldn't admit it to myself. I wanted to see what was going on with it and the game was getting in my way it seemed. That's when I knew I really didn't understand this game.

A lot of people love it. What makes it good?
I can absolutely say that JRPG's in general are not something like a light novel that you'll be able to get through in a single sitting.

JRPG's such as this one are usually a slow burn. You probably won't like too many of the characters at first because they mean nothing to you, but give them time. They need to have their surface level stuff introduced before you can go into their other traits.

For the gameplay, you should also give it time. The game is easing you in to its life sim/battle mechanics and doesn't want to overwhelm you. If you're not used to SMT style combat, you may even have a significantly difficult time with the combat at first because the low level enemies do actually have the potential to kill you. But give it time and everything will click and you'll get to see the extent of what the gameplay has to offer.

Don't forget to use strategy, too. Its easy to want to hit everything as hard as you can and win as quickly as possible but some fights can be more involved than spamming your strongest attacks. Watch for buffs/debuffs/ailments. Try to get criticals. Maximize your turns and minimize your enemy's.

User Info: Khalfan

Khalfan
2 months ago#7
Dark Symphony posted...
I don't get it. The characters go over my head. I can't understand the attraction to a lot of the characters on a visual or personality level. The designs of 5 seem to very much reflect a lot of the shifts in style of a lot of these kinds of games lately. I've never seen it so starkly represented. The cat thing I don't get. A lot of the girls I don't get. The blonde comic-relief buddy looks decent and I can kind asee him in some other franchise I'd enjoy. The main character is the biggest mystery to me. Not so much because he's offensive but because he seems so popular and I honestly, listen to me when I say this, I honestly have no idea why. Is it because he embodies the franchise and that's why people go nuts when he shows up in Smash Brothers or something?

Most of the characters need you to kind of get to know them over time, which is part of the point of the social sim aspect. On the one hand, it does mean that first impressions of those characters don't necessarily mean much. On the other hand, that doesn't mean you will grow to like them or feel attached to them over time, just that you can't know either way up-front. The game is truly massive, and it would be a hell of a commitment to decide to play dozens of hours only to conclude you still don't have any investment in the characters. Kind of unfortunate, that.

For the protagonist, however, the answer is pretty easy. Atlus have been experimenting with the idea of a mostly-silent protagonist whose personality is dictated by player choice for a long time. The whole idea of making the protagonist feel like the player's OC, while still keeping their personality fixed within certain bounds to fit the narrative. It's a pretty difficult and complicated way to write a protagonist, and you can see the differences in the approaches they've taken just by looking at different Persona games and even the commentaries the developers have made. For the Persona 3 protagonist, he's mostly an empty shell with very little personality outside of the player's own dialogue choices. For the Persona 4 protagonist... well, he has a personality, but the character designer Soejima once compared him to a dog - which is to say that if you like what you see, great! But he has no hidden depths, so it's very easy to find him a boring character.
For the P5 protagonist, there was a very deliberate intent of making him seem like more than that. Where Soejima compared P4 protag to a dog, he compared P5 protag to a cat - he has an air of mystery to him, where there's constant implications he has a life outside of what the player does. The idea was for him to be intriguing, and for the player to be able to imagine what he might do in those other parts of his life while never actually knowing. He also has a lot of personality presented through his ambient body language, which changes according to where he is and which world he's in, and even the difference in how soft-spoken he is in his own world versus how confident and smug he sounds in the metaverse.

(as to that last, I guess I should say that I only play with Japanese dialogue so I have absolutely no idea how well the English dub captured that or not. I hope the dub did well with it though, it's such a nice little detail).

So why do people obsess over him so much? Because despite being a mostly-silent protagonist, he has enough personality to be fascinating while also having enough of a gap in his personality to let the player comfortably fill it out however they'd like to imagine. Mileage may vary and all that but I genuinely think he's one of the best examples of this type of protagonist I've ever seen.

The gameflow... OK, I get that there's some kind of slice-of-life social sim element to the game. From what I played it seemed like I was just being zipped a long watching people talk and making a bunch of inconsequential choices rather than actually participating. Getting Tifa or Lulu to like you in Final Fantasy 7 or 10 seemed to be more in-depth as far as strategizing relationships than what I encountered in this game. Do I need to give it more time?

There's a hidden points system for the characters. Different responses will get you different amounts of points with them (or no points), as do things like helping them study for exams, and so forth, and you need to get X number of points with a given character in order to unlock the next rank-up event with them. There's a bunch of ways to get bonus points and so on for game mechanics purposes. So you can focus on always choosing the most optimal response, or you can treat it as more of a roleplaying exercise at the cost of potentially having your bond with that character grow more slowly depending on exactly how you're playing the protagonist. So, there is a degree of actually participating even if it might not feel like it immediately.

With that being said, I remain disappointed with aspects of how this was executed myself. The fact that for example you can go through all of Ann's confidant events while insulting her intelligence and being a creep at her the entire way, and still end up either her best friend or her boyfriend, is ridiculous to me. I've never played P4 for various reasons, but P3 had it be possible to break your social links with other characters if you were too much of a tool, and I think that mechanic should've been kept.

(In cut content it was clear they toyed with the idea of doing that in P5 as well, but it was pretty simplistic. I would really like to have seen something like for example actively losing points with a given confidant if you said something really insensitive or nasty to them).

The worst part? The underlying story that I've seen so far in Persona 5 was legitimately intriguing. I almost couldn't admit it to myself. I wanted to see what was going on with it and the game was getting in my way it seemed. That's when I knew I really didn't understand this game.

A lot of people love it. What makes it good?

I'm sure everyone has their own answer for this question, but mine is probably not that helpful given what you've said, because it's mostly the characters that make it good for me. Oh, don't get me wrong, the combat strikes a good balance of being somewhat tactical while remaining simple enough to not be stressful, and some of the Palace designs are quite good (although Madarame's Palace hurts my eyes, it's just too shiny). The soundtrack is fantastic too. But this game isn't a dungeon crawler with social sim aspects, it's equal parts dungeon crawler and social sim. Which means if you don't find yourself invested in the characters at all, you're going to find roughly half the game anything from uninteresting to actively aggravating.

As a prime example of what I mean, I adore Haru as a character, and I am a massive sap for the relationship between her and the protagonist. But unless I'm misread things, you've played less than 10 hours into the game, correct? Which means even if you rush things you'll likely need to play another 50 or 60 hours to even meet Haru, and another 10-20 beyond that to be able to start her confidant. So I could talk about why I love that character and her personal narrative and that relationship, but I can't imagine how anything I might say would ever convince anyone to play that far into the game if they weren't already enjoying it.

I ramble too much. I guess my overall point is, I love this game despite its myriad flaws, but I can easily see why other people wouldn't. If you're not getting anything out of it, don't force yourself to play it just because other people say it's good.

User Info: Heartfang

Heartfang
2 months ago#8
Pretty much everything you don't like about the game is the appeal.
The internet was a mistake

User Info: GerinTheFox

GerinTheFox
2 months ago#9
Seriously once you get to around the mid point you'll be hooked, also the characters hidden depths start to show, as in real life you don't necessarily like a person at the beginning but they start to grow on you. Games can be much the same and I have played some I hated at the start but grew to become some of my favourites.
May all of the great RPGs get sequels still awaiting Vagrant Story II
GerinKitsune

User Info: Dark Symphony

Dark Symphony
2 months ago#10
Word. I wonder if I'm just starting with the wrong one. Then again one post above says everything I don't like is the appeal so maybe I'm just doomed to not get it. I hate Candy Crush but I get why people play it. This is definitely better than Candy Crush but I certainly don't get it. Perhaps the older ones are paced a little more for the unfamiliar. I know I'd have a lot more patience if it was a franchise I knew and had faith in already.
  1. Boards
  2. Persona 5
  3. What do you actually like about this game?
  • Post New Message

GameFAQs Q&A