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User Info: SaveEstelle

SaveEstelle
3 weeks ago#151
#48 Jake Sisko
"Daaaayad!"
"Jake-Oh!"

I think whether or not Jake Sisko ranks in the upper half of a Star Trek fan's character list is predicated on one thing and one thing alone: whether or not they consider DS9's fourth-season episode "The Visitor" a masterclass enough episode to justify it. I do not.

Jake is Benjamin Sisko's son. His mother died years ago thanks to the attempted Borg invasion of the Alpha Quadrant at Wolf 351. Now his father must raise him as a single parent whilst commanding a space station in contested territory at the galaxy's edge. This is a pretty great premise and for Captain Sisko it sometimes pays off in spades. For Jake himself, however, it's middling. As Anagram notes, he exists predominantly as a cipher for his father. There's nothing inherently wrong with that, but it puzzles me to this day that Cirroc Lofton remained on the opening credits list for all seven seasons yet the late Aron Eisenberg (RIP), whose portrayal as Nog far eclipsed anything the writers ever did with Jake, is forever credited as a guest star.

When we first meet Jake, we quickly learn that he likes baseball, girls, and being mischievous with his delinquent friend. Cool story, bro. As Deep Space Nine progresses, a lot of this basically remains stagnant, though "The Visitor" is enough of a one-off shakeup that for a lot of fans it singlehandedly makes up for it. To me, the episode is significantly overrated, though my complete lack of a father figure growing up (or even much of a mother figure) is the principle factor I contribute to my apathy on the matter. I have never once teared up during the episode; label me a monster.

In truth, I prefer the Jake of the Dominion occupation arc the most. Here, Lofton is given the rare chance to really test his chops as an actor. Jake's subplot involves a commitment to honest journalism (oh right, he becomes a writer; this is neat but let's not talk about the "muse succubus" episode please) and Dominion leaders insisting he tone things down and deliver galactic propaganda. It's pretty good stuff. Less impressive is the fifth season's allegedly special outing entitled "Nor the Battle to the Strong", which is another popular DS9 episode I don't really care about. It's like some kind of war story against the Klingons even though the brief war with the Federation has already ended and it involves Jake running around going AWOL until he meets a character whose shtick as a hard-as-nails type leads to some of the most overwrought bad acting outside of the early seasons of any Rick Berman spinoff series.

Jake basically disappears after the Dominion occupation arc, mostly only showing up whenever his father and Kasidy Yates need a domestic dispute scene together, but to his credit he does share the very last scene in a superb series finale alongside the (far superior character of) Kira Nerys. It's a scene that hits me like a ton of bricks every damn time in the best possible way.

Too bad Jake's fairly whatever elsewhere.
Hi! I'm Quinton.
Did you know that Emilia Clarke will be my wife in 2023?

User Info: SaveEstelle

SaveEstelle
3 weeks ago#152
#47 Montgomery Scott
"Aye, Cap'n, I can do all that. And I can do it without La Forge's or Paris' inane technobabble too if ye'd like."

Scotty's alright. He's a fun, drunken Scotsman who gets into trouble for it nearly as many times as his expertise saves the day. So why is he kicking the write-ups bucket so soon when certain problematic characters remain? It's rather the same raw deal that has been handed to Uhura. Namely, I don't really care about the guy in most instances and I don't remember a ton of his scenes. Amusingly, the actor is more interesting than the character again, because James Doohan fought in World War II and James Doohan World War II stories are wild. Absolutely wild.

I like a lot of Scotty scenes. Especially in the movies. But I'm forever filled with a sense of slight apathy toward a lot of TOS and this corners and subdues poor Scott. "Hello, computer" is a timeless scene from Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, which is pretty damn ironic when considering that a lot of Scotty's "lol, he's from the 23rd century!" misunderstandings over a 1986 IBM computer are bizarrely relatable today. Scotty also shows up on TNG's "Relics", which is a very good episode only marginally diminished by Geordi.

In the Kelvinverse movies, Simon Pegg plays Simon Pegg, which is fortunate enough considering Simon Pegg is in some ways Montgomery Scott. He remains a fun bloke with some decent moral convictions occasionally tested by his appetite for pleasure. He has a little alien sidekick played by, I kid you not, a guy named Deep Roy. Said alien is often misinterpreted as some kind of pygmy Jem'Hadar; he is not, in fact, a pygmy Jem'Hadar.

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Hi! I'm Quinton.
Did you know that Emilia Clarke will be my wife in 2023?

User Info: AxemRedRanger

AxemRedRanger
3 weeks ago#153
this seems like a good place to ask

if I were to start watching the original series (never seen substantial amounts of anything Trek other than the reboot movies), do I go with the remastered version or the original?
[NO BARKLEY NO PEACE]
[NO Advokaiser NO PEACE]
(edited 3 weeks ago)

User Info: Anagram

Anagram
3 weeks ago#154
AxemRedRanger posted...
this seems like a good place to ask

if I were to start watching the original series (never seen substantial amounts of anything Trek other than the reboot movies), do I go with the remastered version or the original?
Just do the remastered. It’s just the same thing with better special effects.
Not changing this sig until I decide to change this sig.
Started: July 6, 2005

User Info: NFUN

NFUN
3 weeks ago#155
Anagram posted...
Just do the remastered. It’s just the same thing with better special effects.
In this case, it sounds like he should do original
Thus is our treaty written; thus is our agreement made. Thought it the arrow of time; memory never fades. What was asked for was given; the price is paid

User Info: Lolo_Guru

Lolo_Guru
3 weeks ago#156
clearly he should go in timeline order, lol

(would that be the worst viewing order possible or what)
Lolo

User Info: Anagram

Anagram
3 weeks ago#157
18. William T. Riker
“Why, hello, ladies.”

I get what they were going for with Riker in season 1. Picard is the best of humanity in a philosophical sense: he’s smart, diplomatic, and unfailingly ethical. Riker is almost that, but he’s also young, handsome, and strong. There’s that one shot in the Ferengi episode where they’re all hunched over and look like rats while Riker, the human, stands tall above them. It’s like a comical film student shot.

Everyone knows about growing the beard and all that, so I won’t go into details. The important part is that Riker could have easily just been a guy on the bridge who says things Picard could have said instead. He could have easily been another Chakotay. Instead, Riker gets a lot of attention. Only Picard, Data, and Worf get more.

Riker gets a lot of flak for being Discount Kirk, and to an extent this is warranted. He’s brasher and more adventurous than Picard, and his literal role from a scriptwriting perspective is to go down to the planet, punch some guys, and get into trouble so we have a character we care about who needs help. I can accept that a lot of people don’t see that much of a difference between them, but really, there’s a huge gulf in terms of personality. Everyone remembers The Best of Both Worlds, but a lot of people don’t remember that Picard isn’t the protagonist. The protagonist is Riker. He’s the one who’s like “I don’t know if I need a stalled career as the first officer of the flagship for the rest of my life” and has to step up and prove that he’s a capable captain in his own right. So while Riker and Kirk have similar roles in the story and sort of similar personalities, there’s a huge difference in terms of inner conflict.

I’d say Riker’s biggest weakness may be Troi. The writers really needed to have put way more emphasis into their relationship or to put way less, but the way it comes off is kind of lame.

Speaking of kind of lame, no one suffers more in the movies than Riker. The writers clearly only had material for Picard and Data. Rather than try to fix this, they just shrugged and moved on. I can’t think of a single thing Riker does in Generations or Insurrection, and all I can remember of him in First Contact and Nemesis is stunning Zephram Cochrane and personally fighting a Reman instead of sending a security guy to do it. At least Worf gets to shoot a Borg while saying “Assimilate this.”
Not changing this sig until I decide to change this sig.
Started: July 6, 2005

User Info: scarletspeed7

scarletspeed7
3 weeks ago#158
Riker deserved better.
"It is too easy being monsters. Let us try to be human." ~Victor Frankenstein, Penny Dreadful

User Info: Anagram

Anagram
3 weeks ago#159
scarletspeed7 posted...
Riker deserved better.
Riker's pretty good. I wonder how he would have been if they'd gone with the plan of killing Picard in Best of Both Worlds.
Not changing this sig until I decide to change this sig.
Started: July 6, 2005

User Info: Anagram

Anagram
3 weeks ago#160
17. Montgomery Scott
“Och, aye, oh’m inna woch nahw.”

I will admit straight off the bat that Scotty doesn’t deserve to be anywhere near this high, but I just love him anyway. He’s the most fleshed out of TOS’ non-core cast, which is to say that he gets more of a personality than nothing, and he has the benefit of having the best actor of the non-core cast. Unlike Uhura, Sulu, Chekov, Chapel, and Rand, Scotty has the benefit of having a very extreme personality that leads to a lot of silly overacting, so he ends up being way more memorable as a result.

Scotty exists for two reasons. The first is so he can say “the ship will explode unless you do X,” and then Kirk has to do X. The second is so that someone will be sitting in the captain’s chair when Kirk and Spock are down on the whatever planet. That’s it. He’s not so much a character as a plot device, and James Doohan made the wise decision to make him as wacky as possible to compensate for that.

You know who the closest analogy is? Emperor Palpatine. Imagine if Palpatine was just a run-of-the-mill evil emperor. “You will obey me or I’ll kill you.” “I survive on the shadows cast by goodness and love.” “I will conquer the galaxy.” He’d be awful and no one would remember him. But because Ian McDiarmid plays him so ridiculous and hammy, everyone loves him, even in the prequels. I guess what I’m saying is that weirdos like me like bad acting and silliness, and Scotty gives me that in spades. We haven’t gotten to Kirk yet, but boy oh boy will we have something to talk about then.

Speaking of acting, this doesn’t relate directly to Scotty, but in the animated series, James Doohan was the only one of the core cast with experience voice acting, so almost every male character outside of the main characters is voiced by him. He tries to disguise his voice, but you can clearly tell that everyone in the galaxy is Scotty, which is wonderful.
Not changing this sig until I decide to change this sig.
Started: July 6, 2005
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