• Topic Closed
You're browsing the GameFAQs Message Boards as a guest. Sign Up for free (or Log In if you already have an account) to be able to post messages, change how messages are displayed, and view media in posts.
This topic contains spoilers - you can click, tap, or highlight to reveal them
  1. Boards
  2. GameFAQs Contests
  3. Movie and Box Office Topic: Prepping for Endgame

User Info: XIII_rocks

XIII_rocks
1 month ago#151
Yeah

See that's what I thought, but Mendelson was like "it's still not super likely" and I was like "7 isn't much?" but I guess I trust the Forbes guy over my own thoughts

But you're right, there probably will be one final push. I figured it'd be done by the end of the month.

That said, I reckon they'll re-release Avatar just before 2 comes out.
Not to be confused with XIII_Stones.

User Info: GildedFool

GildedFool
4 weeks ago#152
Honestly, I think it depends on how many cinemas drop it for this weekend.
https://i.imgtc.com/tP0gkiQ.png

User Info: MetalmindStats

MetalmindStats
4 weeks ago#153
My North American weekend predictions:

1. $184.3 million The Lion King
2. $21.2 million Spider-Man: Far From Home
3. $11.3 million Toy Story 4
4. $5.8 million Crawl
5. $5.3 million Aladdin
6. $3.8 million Yesterday
7. $3.4 million Stuber
8. $2.4 million Annabelle Comes Home
9. $1.3 million The Secret Life of Pets 2
10. $1.2 million Midsommar
11. $1.2 million Avengers: Endgame
12. $880,000 The Farewell
"I believe in a universe that doesn't care, and people who do."
You won the CBX Guru Contest, Advokaiser! Bully for you!

User Info: v_charon

v_charon
4 weeks ago#154
23 in Thursday previews, not too shabby.
:>
Truly smilin'

User Info: MetalmindStats

MetalmindStats
4 weeks ago#155
There's a lot more going on at the box office than the obligatory Endgame news. First off, The Lion King opened to $454.4 million worldwide, for a total of $531 million to date counting its week-early Chinese date. For comparison's sake, Far From Home, which opened earlier in key markets such as North America, the British Isles, Australia, and Japan, was at $577 million by the end of its first North American weekend. TLK still hasn't opened in Japan, Italy, or Hong Kong yet, and with great audience reception, it's likely to hold better than Far From Home from here, so $1 billion is locked.

However, Far From Home itself has reached $971 million to date, setting it up to break $1 billion within the next week. Aladdin is at $988.8 million so far, and it will also reach the mark soon. Those three movies may very well each cross $1 billion within the same week, which would be unprecedented. On top of that, Toy Story 4 will also break $1 billion, though likely near the end of August as opposed to the end of July/beginning of August that the other three are tracking for. It will certainly be interesting to see in what order and on what day each the four manage the feat.
"I believe in a universe that doesn't care, and people who do."
You won the CBX Guru Contest, Advokaiser! Bully for you!
(edited 4 weeks ago)

User Info: scarletspeed7

scarletspeed7
4 weeks ago#156
These nostalgia bombs are soon to run dry, which is interesting to me. Disney didn't want to spread them out and have more consistent fiscal quarters across the board. Instead, I think they're going to end up with some sudden dry wells. I wonder if the heavier push on the proven franchises here in Aladdin and Lion King so close together was at all influenced by the incoming FOX purchase at the time they were being scheduled.

I saw both Aladdin and Lion King, and was enamored with neither particularly. The machine at Disney is very strong in terms of marketing and in polishing these films though. The basic components of filming and editing and providing effects is just so ridiculously good over there.

I think the real question becomes, "What is Disney planning to do to sate their investors?" With this Star Wars trilogy reaching an end this year, a potentially down season for Marvel given the Disney+ push, and the biggest marquee Renaissance films off the table aside from TLM, there's got to be some real questioning in regards to solid tentpoles. Avatar isn't necessarily the savior they need.
"It is too easy being monsters. Let us try to be human." ~Victor Frankenstein, Penny Dreadful

User Info: MetalmindStats

MetalmindStats
4 weeks ago#157
It's certainly an interesting situation Disney finds itself in now. 2019 will be a year for them to remember forever (and though it has exceeded even high-end expectations so far, it certainly looked that way from the outset), I suspect in part because of them wanting to get things rolling for Disney+ quickly, but at what cost?

2020 in particular looks peppered with question marks, quite unlike this year: will the new Mulan's serious take on a comedic musical straddle the fine line of drawing nostalgic general audiences and Chinese moviegoers, for whom such a take on the Mulan legend is nothing new? Will people care about a prequel starring a dead character? Jungle Cruise seems like basically a family-friendly version of Jumanji 2, complete with sharing its big star, but it lacks a franchise's built-in audience. Will its similarities bolster its event status over a somewhat light summer, or will the project prove to be too transparently formulaic for audiences? Can Cruella spin a Maleficent-level success in perspective-twisting from a villain whose mission in the source material is to skin puppies to make a fur coat? The year has not one, but two original Pixar movies, which are major question marks at this point. Finally, what's the untitled Disney Animation movie scheduled for November? Zootopia 2 has been something the fans have looked forward to for a long time, would fit into Disney Animation's sequel phase, and provide Disney one 100% safe bet for the year.

Beyond that, of course, is Avatar 2, which is the biggest question mark on Disney's whole schedule. Looking at it as a guaranteed $2 billion+ and revived franchise would be a huge mistake: the first movie hasn't lasted culturally as well as you'd expect, and who knows what James Cameron's great technological innovation will be this time? In that sense, I definitely concur that Avatar isn't necessarily the savior Disney needs. Neither is any other individual movie or group of movies forthcoming, really. It's striking to me that, for all of Disney's success, only Marvel has managed to build up a brand and stand on its own as a major draw without the benefit of nostalgia. And Disney, of course, is running low on opportunities for their other major subsidiary studios to exploit nostalgia. Another concern: Disney habitually overspends on their movies, which could become a huge problem when the nostalgic gravy train stops rolling after 2019 ends, and especially with Disney+ likely to run at an operating loss in its first few years. Speaking of which, in an increasingly crowded and expensive streaming market, can Disney+ acquire the type of traction in an that you'd expect from the strength of Disney's franchises and general brand? All in all, a surprisingly mixed outlook considering Disney's bordering on a 45% share of studio box office this year and, as you mentioned, is typically very good at marketing and polishing their movies.

And now for something completely different...

I watched the movie of the same name a few hours ago, and it really made me appreciate how Monty Python and the Holy Grail worked so well. I have no inherent opposition to the sketch-comedy-without-a-story (very deliberately in this case) format, but the resulting movie at least ought to be funny, especially considering its everything-and-the-kitchen-sink approach. Even its best sketches (the marriage counselor and mountaineering ones) were only fitfully funny, right about on par with Holy Grail's weakest moments. I felt like the movie would have done well to let certain other moments breathe a bit longer, but then there was the restaurant sketch reminding me that longer isn't always better. All in all, "And Now for Something Completely Different" is a flawed work-in-progress at best, but you can definitely see how Monty Python reached The Holy Grail (which was still sketch-focused even with its overarching plot) from it.
"I believe in a universe that doesn't care, and people who do."
You won the CBX Guru Contest, Advokaiser! Bully for you!
(edited 4 weeks ago)

User Info: scarletspeed7

scarletspeed7
4 weeks ago#158
Completely agree on your assessment.

I think the issue is that Star Wars SHOULD have been a perennial release for them, but they squandered the goodwill that they first engendered with the Abrams film. The audience is quite fickle and prone to chewing itself up and killing momentum quickly. The smarter move, I think, would have been films that push the edges of Star Wars further out with less Force-sensitive material. Rogue One seemed to be a perfect example of where Star Wars could go. Of course, you could ALWAYS turn it around with Star Wars. I think fans are still starved for the types of movies they want out of the franchise.

Disney+ easily could be the big pioneering prospect in the streaming service world. Now that the battle lines are drawing themselves, HBO Max and Disney+ make it very clear that there will be a war between the largest production studios, and that everyone needs to pick sides. Hulu is functionally in symbiotic partnership with Disney, Warner is going to consolidate its material with HBO Max it sounds like, Netflix is out on its own and forced to go more independent now, and Amazon is going to be pushing in with Lord of the Rings as a big anchor for a more realistic investment into its streaming platform. It's the opposite of the glut of streaming services we got at E3 this year, all of which I SUSPECT will end up dead within 5 years or at least only subsisting on a very small amount of support. The consolidation honestly doesn't bode well for moviegoers; resources being devoted to the streaming side of entertainment means less premium money-driving content is being pushed for cinemas. A perfect example? Exactly what was announced for Disney+ at E3.

Disney was supposedly going to push a new Indiana Jones, but that's been pushed back. I suspect that, domestically, that's a 300 million dollar property still. Jungle Cruise and Cruella both feel like they won't pull audiences like the films of this year. Cruella, especially, has to contend with the idea that there was already a 101 Dalmatians remake that focused signficantly on a live-action rendition of the character. It's too bad Disney didn't push other villains after Maleficent, such as Jafar and Hades. There's definitely a market for Greek mythology, with films of fairly poor quality and abysmal word of mouth still drumming up strong box office scores. A Disney tie-in and that monster of production behind it? I think you could start a decent live-action FRANCHISE with the material available.

In any event, the most interesting aspect of this year is how decimated the box office is outside of Disney. You gotta wonder if studios were gun shy on the year itself since Disney stole a lot of prime real estate, and if they believe they can open more competitively next year. Or will next year be an even WORSE year than this year? If streaming services are eating up the market for theatrical films right now, just wait until next year.
"It is too easy being monsters. Let us try to be human." ~Victor Frankenstein, Penny Dreadful

User Info: scarletspeed7

scarletspeed7
3 weeks ago#159
I saw lots of low predictions for Once Upon A Time in Hollywood, so I'm glad that it still pulled in some truly respectable opening day numbers.
"It is too easy being monsters. Let us try to be human." ~Victor Frankenstein, Penny Dreadful

User Info: MetalmindStats

MetalmindStats
2 weeks ago#160
My North American weekend predictions for August 2-4:

1. $51.0 million Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw
2. $37.3 million The Lion King
3. $17.9 million Once Upon a Time in Hollywood
4. $6.7 million Toy Story 4
5. $6.0 million Spider-Man: Far From Home
6. $2.3 million Crawl
7. $2.1 million Aladdin
8. $1.8 million Yesterday
9. $1.6 million The Farewell
10. $820,000 Annabelle Comes Home
11. $600,000 The Secret Life of Pets 2
12. $520,000 Stuber

Hobbs & Shaw's prospects aren't looking as strong as they ought to be, with very lacking presales. The Lion King's longevity has been another disappointment so far. Hollywood opened fine, but with mixed word of mouth, it's unlikely to reach the $400 million worldwide necessary to break even. If this weekend winds up in line with my expectations, I'm ready to call that 2019 will wind up behind 2018; very disappointing if you're not Disney.
"I believe in a universe that doesn't care, and people who do."
You won the CBX Guru Contest, Advokaiser! Bully for you!
  1. Boards
  2. GameFAQs Contests
  3. Movie and Box Office Topic: Prepping for Endgame
  • Topic Closed