I feel like this game does not go back to series 'roots'

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  3. I feel like this game does not go back to series 'roots'

User Info: Gwonam_is_Bae

Gwonam_is_Bae
7 months ago#1
So after playing this game for a bit, completing a handful shrines and a couple dungeons, I can quite help but feel a bit disappointed. The dungeons were honestly bad since they were too easy and small (emphasis on small) and the shrines, while interesting ones exist, leave a lot to be desired.

The reason I say this doesn't really appear to go back to the roots of the series is because it seems to be lacking things that have existed in every Zelda game. There aren't any items (the magnet thing and ice thing are basically your items) in the traditional sense, and due to that there doesn't feel like any form of progression. Even in Zelda 1 there were certain dungeons you couldn't do without the ladder and certain areas you couldn't get to without the raft/ladder...also the flute and lantern....I feel like that's rewarding in many ways and doesn't exist in this game.The dungeons are also extremely subpar, I mean they're barely dungeons. The bosses at the end are pretty lame too imo - lame design, and they're just health sponges.

I also find the exploration of this game to be somewhat lacking, fly around until your iPad tells you there is a shrine, look for glowing thing and fly to it. There's no real reason to walk around as far as I'm concerned...you get the standard pick up random stuff that basically does nothing mechanic that is existent in most open world games...and the weapon durability honestly makes this effectively worthless in my opinion. Durability is fine, but why should I put effort into finding cool stuff if it breaks almost immediately?

I could say a lot more, but at this point I've probably written too much anyways
"The Journey awaits!" - prophet of regret
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User Info: este914

este914
7 months ago#2
Of course it doesn't "go back to series roots" because it's an entirely different game compared to something like Zelda 1.

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User Info: CrimsonSmasher

CrimsonSmasher
7 months ago#3
Yeah, the whole "going back to it's roots" thing is all PR s***.
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User Info: ZeldaFan42

ZeldaFan42
7 months ago#4
BotW does very well a returning to one of the series’s roots, and that’s the exploration element. The original Zelda was inspired by Miyamoto’s childhood adventures exploring the country side, and I think that’s what they were talking about when they kept on talking about a “return to the roots.” That sense of freedom and discovery as you traversed the overworld looking for the dungeons.

That said, it does drop the ball when it comes to the other hallmark of the series, the dungeons. Which is fine. BotW was a very worthwhile experiment for the franchise. Despite its flaws, it’s still become my personal favorite Zelda title. I think the next Zelda game is actually going to be much better because of BotW.

In my opinion, SS is the opposite of BotW. It’s a game that focuses entirely on the dungeons to the detriment of the overworld in the same way that BotW focuses on the overworld to the detriment of the dungeons. We’ve had the Zelda pendulum swing from one extreme to the other now, so hopefully it can find the middle ground between SS and BotW and truly make the ultimate Zelda game.
They say a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance. - Sir Terry Pratchett

User Info: wiiztec

wiiztec
7 months ago#5
The dungeons in SS were mediocre though
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User Info: SS4kronos33

SS4kronos33
7 months ago#6
thats because it dont go back to the roots. you were foolish to believe so
"On my business card, I am a corporate president. In my mind, I am a game developer. But in my heart, I am a gamer." - Satoru Iwata (1959-2015).

User Info: ZeldaFan42

ZeldaFan42
7 months ago#7
wiiztec posted...
The dungeons in SS were mediocre though


Some people would argue that the overworld in BotW was mediocre. I personally disagree with that, but in the end each person is allowed their own opinion.

Regardless of your opinion on SS’s dungeons, you can’t argue that the entire game wasn’t structured around them. Even the overworld sections leading to the dungeons were structured more like mini-dungeons than traditional Zelda overworld areas. SS was a tube that led you by hand from one dungeon to another and is the obvious extreme end of the direction the franchise was heading before BotW. BotW pulled a hard U-turn, went back to the original Zelda and asked “What if instead of focusing on the dungeons we focused on the overworld design?”

BotW did return to one of the series’s roots. It just focused on that singular element to the detriment of the other elements the series is known for.
They say a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but it is not one half so bad as a lot of ignorance. - Sir Terry Pratchett

User Info: Muljo Stpho

Muljo Stpho
7 months ago#8
ZeldaFan42 posted...
In my opinion, SS is the opposite of BotW. It’s a game that focuses entirely on the dungeons to the detriment of the overworld in the same way that BotW focuses on the overworld to the detriment of the dungeons. We’ve had the Zelda pendulum swing from one extreme to the other now, so hopefully it can find the middle ground between SS and BotW and truly make the ultimate Zelda game.


I'd lean closer towards the SS extreme than the BotW extreme, personally. (On a side note I also prefer both of their approaches over TWW's big large vast open sea with a carefully spaced out scattering of tiny little minuscule islands. Redundant phrasing intended.)

But I've been imagining and hoping to see that "middle ground" for a long time, long before SS was even a thing. My inspirations go back to:
1) the somewhat blurred lines between overworld and underworld in LttP's dark world forest dungeon (imagine that kind of format with multiple entrances, both obvious and hidden, spread out across the entire map instead of just that one corner of the map)
2) the way the Zelda cartoon presented the idea of what the "underworld" was, as one vast interconnected labyrinth sprawling beneath all of Hyrule (instead of just having isolated / self-contained dungeons)

But new games along the way have added more and more to the wishlist of things that could be included.

It's kind of a side note but I also think that ST and PH's "centralized dungeon with repeat visits to progress further" format was a good idea that they managed to seriously botch both times they tried it. It should not just be one long dungeon crawl with shortcuts accessible on the later visits to bypass the earlier sections like it was in PH. It should not just be a neutral hub with doors to access separate self-contained dungeon segments like the tower in ST. I would rather see them attempt the concept as an interconnected sprawl of overlapping segments, like maybe setting something up with complex primary chambers where half of each separate visit to the dungeon would be spent using new tools to access new areas of the dungeon.

On another side note, I hate the "endurance trial" type of "secret dungeon". Same big empty room repeated over and over with batches of different enemies in them. Gets boring and lame just a few rooms into it, for me. I'd rather see more secrets like LADX's "color dungeon", something just as unique and noteworthy as a normal dungeon.

Anyway, I want to see them attempt a format where we could have:
1) plenty of land to explore freely like BotW
2) a full-scale underworld sprawled beneath it all (dungeon-like enemy strongholds could exist within this and they would be connected to the cave systems / sewer systems / mines / whatever else all around the kingdom (consider the Bulblin habitation in the walls of the underground portion of the river in TP and imagine that something like that could connect to other underground areas all over the map))
3) several well-sized sky islands floating over the whole kingdom
4) a considerable amount of open sea with some sailing and a few well-sized islands within reach
5) a few self-contained dungeons where appropriate (remote locations like islands / sky islands or secure locations like the castle / BotW-style shrines), plus one or two large "central" dungeons (possibly blurring lines between overworld / underworld more here)
6) at least a few optional locations with comparable design to full-scale traditional dungeons (somewhere for major sidequest stories to shine, lots of plot dealing with local troubles threatening a specific region that aren't necessarily connected to the main plot)
"This ain't like fieldwork. You never have to notarize a man and kill him in triplicate. Well... Almost never..." - Ruby

User Info: ThomasPrewitt42

ThomasPrewitt42
7 months ago#9
Gwonam_is_Bae I agree with you.

At the start you have the tower and you can see four shrines and mark the spot on your map and go there. Unfortunately most shrines can't be found like that. It isn't really exploring to just roam around wherever your sensor beeps tell you to go. So many large mostly empty areas out there, plus all the cliff climbing is tedious and unpleasant.

I did enjoy running around the rain forest area, nice scenery there, and some of the other woods areas were nice. But most of the overworld is just run through quickly, try to avoid if possible, get it done and forget about it.

Did anyone honestly not just look at a map that came with a strategy guide or check for one online to find the shrines though?

I hated all the dungeons, it just pointless running back and forth doing idiotic puzzles. Most of the shrines were pointless, with a few good ones in there.

I would've loved if it was like the original game, you in a dungeon, kill monsters, move to the next room, some rooms unable to get through until all the monsters are dead and then the door opens to the next area, that sort of thing.

Most people hate durability, there no real point to it. The game is much more fun when you complete the trials and get the master sword to be at attack power 60 all the time, and when it says its running low on power, you teleport back to the area to do the trials, enter that, exit immediately by teleporting someone else on your map, and its full recharged again.

User Info: paco1995

paco1995
7 months ago#10
ThomasPrewitt42 posted...
The game is much more fun when you complete the trials and get the master sword to be at attack power 60 all the time, and when it says its running low on power, you teleport back to the area to do the trials, enter that, exit immediately by teleporting someone else on your map, and its full recharged again.


You don't have to deal with durability that way but it sounds like a repetitive and dull experience to me. I preferred when the game forced me out of my comfort zone and I had to take advantage of all the options the game has to offer, like for example the Eventide Island sidequest. It made things exciting and got me more enganged in the game to the point where I discovered stuff I wouldn't have otherwise discovered if the game didn't force me out of my comfort zone.
"Paco is better than me." WellComeOn talking about Smash
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