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  3. Too Frustrating, Gave Up After Fire Gigas

User Info: VariaSuit

VariaSuit
5 months ago#1
I know I will probably catch some flak for this post, but I gave up on Secret of Mana. When the virus hit, I decided I would cross three major SNES games off my bucket list that I've been wanting to get to for over 10 years. EarthBound, Secret of Mana, and Illusion of Gaia.

Secret of Mana frustrated me. I really enjoyed the game for the first hour, liked the story, music, graphics, and the weapon-charge system. But once new characters were added to the party, things got messy. Constantly switching between characters and then toggling the ring menu between spells or items in the heat of combat was too interruptive to the flow of the game. Not being able to dodge boss' magic attacks was cheap. Even with adjusting the AI, the other characters weren't helpful. The constant limited-space/corridor battles are a nightmare.

Then the part that really set me off was that enemies can stun-lock you. Not just the bosses either, but regular enemies can stun-lock you and spam. Not only is that incredibly cheap, but for me it was unforgivable.

I did my best to give this game a fair shake, and I'm sure it's a fine game but it's just not for me.

User Info: silktail

silktail
5 months ago#2
VariaSuit posted...
Constantly switching between characters and then toggling the ring menu between spells or items in the heat of combat was too interruptive to the flow of the game.
You don't normally have to switch between characters for combat.
The "Y" button open's your ring menu and the "X" button opens an Ally's ring, press it again for the other ally. I guess that's a bit too late to help you.

But yes, opening menus does interrupt if you would rather it played as a pure action game.
(Plus getting stun-locked is a time when you try to swap characters, if it even lets you!)
---

User Info: TriforceSD

TriforceSD
5 months ago#3
The frustrations with this game are what made me want to keep playing actually. If you made it past Spikey Tiger, that's a good start right off the bat. If you haven't been using magic, that's the key if you don't want as much challenge.. The rings can be annoying tho.
Our kitty has left to be with the Lord.
RIP Rascal, March 12, 2016. We miss you dearly...

User Info: VariaSuit

VariaSuit
5 months ago#4
silktail posted...
You don't normally have to switch between characters for combat.
The "Y" button open's your ring menu and the "X" button opens an Ally's ring, press it again for the other ally. I guess that's a bit too late to help you.

But yes, opening menus does interrupt if you would rather it played as a pure action game.
(Plus getting stun-locked is a time when you try to swap characters, if it even lets you!)
---

Thanks for the input, maybe I'll get back to this game another time. I'm moving on to Illusion of Gaia for now though.

User Info: Ninja4820

Ninja4820
5 months ago#5
I'm going through a similar COVID "avenging my past" session. I 3-playered this about 15 years ago and it was an utter mess.

I'm not having any problems playing it solo now though. I think the advice to use X vs. Y to select the main vs. auxiliary characters might help you a lot. Also, this is an action rpg, so I wouldn't treat the pauses in game play and undodgeables as negatives. Once you accept them for what they are, you learn to factor that in similarly to how you would with a normal turn-based rpg.

You might be underleveled. Or another thing: Make sure to upgrade your weapons! I think me and my buddies ran around with level 1 weps for about 15 hours of gameplay, aggravating our frustration, before we realized it.
Killed 4819 ninjas to get here.

User Info: VariaSuit

VariaSuit
5 months ago#6
Ninja4820 posted...
I'm going through a similar COVID "avenging my past" session. I 3-playered this about 15 years ago and it was an utter mess.

I'm not having any problems playing it solo now though. I think the advice to use X vs. Y to select the main vs. auxiliary characters might help you a lot. Also, this is an action rpg, so I wouldn't treat the pauses in game play and undodgeables as negatives. Once you accept them for what they are, you learn to factor that in similarly to how you would with a normal turn-based rpg.

You might be underleveled. Or another thing: Make sure to upgrade your weapons! I think me and my buddies ran around with level 1 weps for about 15 hours of gameplay, aggravating our frustration, before we realized it.

I did a fair amount of grinding early in the game (i always do this with RPGs) and had decent levels. The main character i leveled up to level 13 right at the start of the game as soon as you get the sword (took a couple hours). It doesn't matter though, I've moved on from this game for the foreseeable future. I am enjoying Illusion Of Gaia much more, I find it more intuitive and user-friendly.

Like I said, I'm sure Secret of Mana is a great game, and I usually do enjoy these types of games. I did my best to give it a fair shake, it just wasn't for me.

User Info: badboy

badboy
4 months ago#7
Game is really easy once you get used to its mechanics
So at the beginning it might feel messy due to a few difficulty spikes but it is a very easy game overall

User Info: Phexar

Phexar
4 months ago#8
It gets easier after the Underground Palace generally since magic really tends to break the game apart.

In particular Spikey Tiger and Fire Gigas are both some of the nastiest bosses. Tiger is infamous for being a huge difficulty spike (which you don't have magic for), and Gigas loves his fire spam so much that I always thought he was a case of the developers forcing the player to try out spamming your brand new magic (which happens to be water) on him to win.

The Forest and Witch's Castle aren't that easy though considering the werewolves and stuff, and the Underground Palace is a bit of a slog with all the dividing enemies that can end up draining your MP leaving you with not enough to handle Fire Gigas unless you expect it.

After all that though you'll have more opportunities to stock up on magic walnuts and have more MP in general to spam magic on more difficult threats, especially when you get moon magic later on for the Sprite which lets him drain MP from enemies. Holding onto weapons like the Sprite's Spear and later the Imp's Fork which inflict the Balloon status on enemies to paralyze them without using magic helps out a lot too - I never upgrade the javelin past Imp's Fork for that reason.
I like to get to the heart of matters. (Created 6/6/2003)

User Info: roitact

roitact
2 months ago#9
The fire gigas dungeon is a big step up in difficulty. I think it's there to make you grind up your other party membera because at that point you've just got magic and need some levels to get a decent mp pool.
I will not be responsible for your stupidity.. GT: jimmyrockstar, PSN: testesbomb---

User Info: zoogelio

zoogelio
1 month ago#10
On my first playthrough as a kid, I was still gradually getting better at RPGs (my skill level gradually stepped up over FF1 -> FF4 -> SOM -> FF6 -> Chrono Trigger -> FF7 + the Game Boy trilogy). I recall dying once or twice to Spiky Tiger, the first real roadblock in the game, then more times to the Fire Gigas. That was the biggest roadblock. I grinded to level up and level-up the Water element magic and eventually beat him.

After that, IIRC, I died once to the next dungeon boss, once to several of the next bosses (not all), but none seemed as hard as the aforementioned two. A lot was getting the hang of each bosses' attacks. Eventually mid-game, I wasn't dying even once to most bosses. Later in the game, the penultimate dungeon bosses gave me some trouble and a plant monster boss named after a unique form of algae that starts off the 3rd to last dungeon/mega-dungeon. Final 2 bosses gave me some trouble at first, but the last boss was mostly down to learning the mechanics of the fight.

SoM, for me, fit the learning process at learning the game and the genre. By later FF games, very few bosses were causing game overs (FF7's Materia Keeper & Carry Armor of course, but 2nd time I won vs. each) and every final boss of a later FF (except FF12) had 1 game over as I learned what attacks to watch out for (Super Nova, Hell's Judgment, Grand Cross). It just takes getting the hang of things and when things seem too tough, leveling up. SoM requires not only levelling up the characters, but also the magic. Water Magic needs to be levelled up anyway to boost healing potency (Cure Water). For the Sprite, levelling up magic boost his attack spells (and the length Saber spells last).

And if you don't like being stun-locked, you won't like Seiken Densetsu 3. The bosses often spam magic spells or techniques that stop all the action for the animation. The game also disables running in combat, leading to feeling like you're pushing your characters through molasses. SD3 to me is a more polarized game. Does some things better than SOM, does some things much worse than SOM.
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