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User Info: romraptor

romraptor
2 months ago#11
Thanks! No, I'm not translating from Japanese, but I intend to correct the sentences that I know are completely mistranslated and those I feel don't make sense in the English translation.

User Info: Jay_Shaw

Jay_Shaw
2 months ago#12
I agree with BareknuckleRoo's interpretation that Rub and XXXX are supposed to actually erase the target from existence if they succeed (at least in the NES version of the game that was released in the United States in 1990). At least that was my interpretation when I played the NES version of this game when growing up, since I interpreted "Rub" to mean rubbing something out (e.g., with an eraser or white-out) and XXXX to be the function on an electronic typewriter you could use to have the typewriter white out a keystroke you had erroneously entered. If "erased" is the message the game displays when these spells are successful, that would go with this general theme, which made sense to me even when I was much younger....

--Jay
(edited 2 months ago)

User Info: BareknuckleRoo

BareknuckleRoo
2 months ago#13
Nintendo of America also liked to censor mention of death or killing, hence the censorship of RUB's original name, Death. Same reason it likely says Terminated and Slain instead of Dead. I would argue Terminated is more awkward sounding than Erased is. Despite the censorship we knew what was meant.

So the question is whether or not the translation should be JP -> Swedish, or if it should be EN -> Swedish. I would not mix the two, because then you're just making up your own thing and localizing rather than actually translating the dialogue, which is generally not preferable (Tales of Phantasia had a disastrous SNES translation that took extreme script liberties).

User Info: Pre_PHD_Lee

Pre_PHD_Lee
2 months ago#14
Bareknuckleroo has the gist of the translation. It's something like "death has visited you". I'm a novice at Japanese and can't give you much of the nuance, but that's more or less the literal translation. Something a little more straightforward might be "You have died".

Explicit references to death were usually prohibited by Nintendo of America in those days, which is why the "death" description was redone to say "erased".

The Rub spell in the Japanese version was actually the English word Death; it's a spell that's actually been in most of the Final Fantasy games but was never translated accurately until the PSX generation.

XXXX was the English word Kill in the Japanese version.
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User Info: CrashGordon94_

CrashGordon94_
2 months ago#15
Decided to find the passage I was thinking of.
https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/YMMV/FinalFantasyI
Under "Fridge Brilliance":
Also, the "Death" spell getting changed to "RUB", which erases you, is just more of that ol' NES-era NOA censorship, right? Well, maybe, but it could also be an informed change: in 1st edition D&D, the sixth spell level had two instant-kills. One was Death Spell. The other? Disintegrate. The spell is described in the rulebook as "causing the target to vanish"; moreover, the FF1 spell in question behaves much more like Disintegrate than Death Spell (the former is single-target attack with a hard save versus dying, i.e. what RUB is, the latter was a complex hit-dice-based area-effect spell). The only real difference is that Disintegrate explicitly works against Undead (it's an Alteration effect, not a Conjuration of negative energy) while RUB tends to be much more sketchy against Undead, which is part of why it isn't as respected as a player-usable spell. Overall, while it might still be censoring the word "death", it also really seems like someone at NOA did their homework and understood the essence of what FF1 was.
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User Info: BareknuckleRoo

BareknuckleRoo
2 months ago#16
And in removing religious references, the Holy spell was renamed Fade. I always thought as a kid, when I knew nothing of localization/censorship, that it killed by making vital organs, body parts, or chunks of flesh literally fade out existence, which is much more gruesome.

User Info: Jay_Shaw

Jay_Shaw
2 months ago#17
Yeah - I guess censoring the name of an instant-death spell isn't going to be very effective when the spell still continues to have the actual effect of instantly killing its target. The censorship of actual visual gore (e.g., the finishing moves in the original version of Mortal Kombat) seems to be more effective.

Was the Final Fantasy I NA localization team just trying to censor the words "kill" and "death," and if so, is this something that Square's NA localization team decided to do on its own without being required to do so by Nintendo? I notice that other NES games such as Ultima Exodus have spells named "Death" and "Kill." I guess Ultima Exodus is a much more obscure game, so maybe they just managed to fly under the radar or something.

By the way, censorship of NA versions of Japanese games was apparently still ongoing as recently as 2000 because I recall reading that a scene in Breath of Fire IV where Emperor Fou Lu decapitates Emperor Soniel appears in the Japanese version of the game but is omitted from the NA version of the game. Heck - for all I know, they're still censoring the North American versions of Japanese games today (I haven't really checked and haven't played very many games that are terribly recent). As far as I could tell, the original justification for censoring the NES-era games was because the games were largely marketed toward children; that said, it wouldn't surprise me if the practice continued in some circumstances today for some other reasons (e.g., to get a particular game rated at a lower maturity level)....

--Jay

User Info: BareknuckleRoo

BareknuckleRoo
2 months ago#18
Not all gore and violence were caught by Nintendo of America. Good example is Maniac Mansion's NES version where the censors missed that you can microwave a hamster to death.

User Info: Jay_Shaw

Jay_Shaw
2 months ago#19
So, generally speaking, it was the official policy of Nintendo of America to censor various specific things from NES games released in North America (apparently including use of the words "kill" and "death" in certain situations), but the policy wasn't always enforced very well or evenly (and may not have even been known to every game publisher it applied to)?

--Jay

User Info: _Kaz

_Kaz
2 months ago#20
I imagine their localisation department was very small. Sometimes a thing like the Castlevania Nintendo Power cover just slips through.
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