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User Info: The Wave Master

The Wave Master
1 month ago#251
I have not played Magic since before I got really sick in 2014. I had a nice collection going, and then life hit, and I spent those 6 months in the hospital, and in and out of a coma for a few weeks in between. I'm so far behind on expansions that I have no idea what's going on any longer.

I finally hooked up the air fryer, and it is pretty swank. I did some home made frieds last night, and it got the cooked well and crisp without any oil. It's like magic. I'm going to get some cheese sticks this week and really chow down.
We are who we choose to be.
I_Abibde posted...
On that, I agree. Ice Age was a great expansion. Certainly good enough to kick the crap out of my Fallen Empires decks, heh. It was also a nice change after Tempest, which was the 'in' thing when I started trying to play.

I feel like your timing is off there...? Tempest was part of the Weatherlight/Rath Cycle. Which came after the Mirage Cycle, which came after Ice Age.

The early set order was the base set, then Arabian Nights, Antiquities, Legends, The Dark, Fallen Empires, Ice Age, Homelands.

Homelands got such a negative reaction that they panicked and decided to do Ice Age again, which is what led to Alliances, which is when they started playing with the idea of releasing sets as part of cycles. After that was Mirage/Visions, which was a cycle of its own.

Then they did Weatherlight, which led to an endless series of sets, cycles, and blocks that were basically all just one long running story, which is the point where I tuned out because it just didn't interest me at all, and my friend group had kind of stopped playing Magic by that point (actually, I kind of started faltering because Mirage wasn't that appealing to me, and only got a couple Visions boosters before dropping off).

When I first started playing it was during the tail-end of Revised/3rd Edition, right before the release of 4th Edition. It was the point where Fallen Empires was the "current" booster set, The Dark was still in circulation (but like I mentioned, some store owners had already started raising prices on them), and there were still packs and boxes from all the earlier sets still available if you looked hard enough (I remember seeing a full Arabian Nights box for $400). My group sort of peaked during Ice Age and Homelands, then tapered off after.

My friends sort of started getting back into it again around Time Spiral (just after they did Coldsnap, which was their third Ice Age set, a decade late), though most of us don't buy boosters any more, or pay attention to set metaplot or flavor text like we used to. Now we just occasionally buy a pre-constructed deck or individual cards off Amazon. Though I did buy a box of Unhinged at one point.





EDIT: Actually, on reflection, you might be thinking of Coldsnap - that was an Ice Age-related set that came out at some point after Tempest.
"Wall of Text'D!" --- oldskoolplayr76
"POwned again." --- blight family
(edited 1 month ago)

User Info: WhiskeyDisk

WhiskeyDisk
1 month ago#253
I've got to be honest. I've...never understood the entire TCG thing. I can deal with luck based factors, I have no issues with dice or gambling. I also have no problem with known boards with known pieces and known rules.

All that being said, TCGs always seemed to me like playing chess, except pulling the pieces out of a bag like Scrabble, but everyone gets to bring their own bag, which itself is a PTW/gacha in building the bag you bring.

It sort of combines the two things I hate the most about both concepts.
The SBA has closed for business, we thank you for your patronage Assassins.
~there's always free cheese in a mousetrap.
WhiskeyDisk posted...
I've got to be honest. I've...never understood the entire TCG thing. I can deal with luck based factors, I have no issues with dice or gambling. I also have no problem with known boards with known pieces and known rules.

All that being said, TCGs always seemed to me like playing chess, except pulling the pieces out of a bag like Scrabble, but everyone gets to bring their own bag, which itself is a PTW/gacha in building the bag you bring.

Kind of. But that's the appeal - different players get to play in different ways. Someone who wants to play with a massive army of giant creatures (sort of in the Yu-Gi-Oh! mold) and someone who mostly wants to play fast burn/hand denial (the way I used to play) can both enjoy the game. Without that flexibility, I probably never would have gotten into it - I definitely never got into any of the other games that came out around that same period where they came with two pre-made decks, one for each player (ie, I have a Star Wars box set where one player played as the Rebels/Light Side and the other player played Imperials/Dark Side, and you just took both decks out of the same box and played without buying any extra cards).

Personally, I started out with a deck that was mostly smaller creatures, healing, and some minor direct damage (white/black), but eventually gravitated to an extremely creature-light, powerful damage spell-heavy deck that only healed by stealing life from the opponent and mostly just tried to murder them as quickly as possible (red/black). I also had a blue/black Millstone deck that existed solely to make the opponent discard all their cards, preventing them from actually doing anything until they lose by running out of cards (I called it my "No Fun" deck). At the moment, my main decks are a white/red deck that balances healing with spell attacks (still almost no creatures, only spells), and a white/black vampire deck I made that is built around a combo that causes infinite damage to everyone at the table who isn't me.

It also depends on who you play with, and how you play. I almost always play in games with 4-6 players, who are playing casually, using the old rules from the 90s (when we all learned how to play), and none of us play in tournaments (where everyone is way too serious and there's a huge pay-to-win factor involved in getting competitive decks). If I was playing in hardcore 1-on-1 professional circuit circles, I'd be playing very different decks (and not actually having any fun).

In my group, you could easily buy a single pre-made deck for $20-30 or so and be somewhat competitive (and a few boosters/individual card purchases would make you very competitive). There isn't a huge financial investment unless you want it to be. Conversely, there are people who probably spend hundreds (if not thousands) of dollars every year to get new cards, as the tournament scene only allows cards from the last block or two (ie, the last couple years).

Though my personal favorite CCG of all time was Legend of the Five Rings. Because that was a game where they would literally take the results of various tournaments and RPG sessions at conventions, and would integrate those results into the overarching plot of the story. So if Lion decks were beating Dragon decks in tournaments, then in the story the Lion would start to press into Dragon territory. If players were playing a lot of tainted cards in Crane decks, then in the plot the Crane were being corrupted by the Shadowlands. And so on. To the point where some players would literally play non-competitive decks or sub-optimal builds solely to attempt to influence the overall metaplot.

L5R actually built to a final tournament, where the deck the winner was playing would determine who became Emperor in-universe. The developers actually wrote an ending to the story for every clan, and put them in envelopes, which they then tore up when the last player with a deck from that clan was eliminated from the tournament (at GenCon). It was an incredibly huge deal, with an incredibly invested player-base, at a time when that sort of thing was almost completely unheard of:

http://www.alderac.com/2019/12/16/the-day-of-thunder-part-1-the-history-of-aeg-11
"Wall of Text'D!" --- oldskoolplayr76
"POwned again." --- blight family

User Info: WhiskeyDisk

WhiskeyDisk
1 month ago#255
As a non-player, PO...I understood some of those words from context clues, but if we're being honest you could have literally made half of that post up out of thin air and I'd have had the same reaction to it. I doubt you're screwing with me, but for all intents and purposes, the best I can do is smile and nod and say...ok.
The SBA has closed for business, we thank you for your patronage Assassins.
~there's always free cheese in a mousetrap.

User Info: Zeus

Zeus
1 month ago#256
I_Abibde posted... On that, I agree. Ice Age was a great expansion. Certainly good enough to kick the crap out of my Fallen Empires decks, heh. It was also a nice change after Tempest, which was the 'in' thing when I started trying to play.

The only thing I have to say about Tempest is f*** phasing.

The Wave Master posted...
I have not played Magic since before I got really sick in 2014. I had a nice collection going, and then life hit, and I spent those 6 months in the hospital, and in and out of a coma for a few weeks in between. I'm so far behind on expansions that I have no idea what's going on any longer.

I think I dropped out right around Le-Gi-Ons (which apparently was 2003, a bit earlier than I thought), or maybe the expansion before it which started the block.

I did pick up a few packs from the Kamigawa block despite not playing and, apparently a bit after that, I played in my first and only tourney -- a release sealed draft or whatever for Planar Chaos (and notably got a copy of Teneb the Harvester, which helped in a few games), which was the last time I played MtG (and I top 8'd, but it was just a local tourney).

ParanoidObsessive posted...
Then they did Weatherlight, which led to an endless series of sets, cycles, and blocks that were basically all just one long running story, which is the point where I tuned out because it just didn't interest me at all, and my friend group had kind of stopped playing Magic by that point (actually, I kind of started faltering because Mirage wasn't that appealing to me, and only got a couple Visions boosters before dropping off).

Kek. Yeah, the running storyline -- particulary the super-long one that ran between blocks -- was pretty garbo. But that's kind of the issue these games tend to run into, because sooner or later there's the temptation to eschew lore in favor of an actual story.

ParanoidObsessive posted...
It also depends on who you play with, and how you play. I almost always play in games with 4-6 players

Kinda how we often did it, although it meant having separate decks for multi vs single especially when players were insisting on mana rush. It's kinda the only way to go when you've got a whole bunch of people together.

WhiskeyDisk posted...
As a non-player, PO...I understood some of those words from context clues, but if we're being honest you could have literally made half of that post up out of thin air and I'd have had the same reaction to it. I doubt you're screwing with me, but for all intents and purposes, the best I can do is smile and nod and say...ok.

The important takeaway is that a game like MtG rather uniquely facilitates all kinds of play styles, which you don't necessarily see in other CCGs. And, because the way MtG is structured, it also has more play options than other CCGs when it comes to things like group play (which is difficult to do at all with some CCGs).
(\/)(\/)|-|
There are precious few at ease / With moral ambiguities / So we act as though they don't exist.
Zeus posted...
The only thing I have to say about Tempest is f*** phasing.

Conceptually, it's a cool idea. Mechanically, it kind of sucks, because it takes too much coordination and pre-planning to make it worthwhile, otherwise it basically just turns into "You can't use half your cards half the time".



Zeus posted...
Kek. Yeah, the running storyline -- particulary the super-long one that ran between blocks -- was pretty garbo. But that's kind of the issue these games tend to run into, because sooner or later there's the temptation to eschew lore in favor of an actual story.

I'm not against long-running storylines in general - the original L5R storyline was awesome, and that ran across three base sets and five booster sets (over the span of about 2 years).

The problem is, when the story isn't good, now you're committed to being stuck with it for multiple sets. That was also the case with L5R - the second storyline was kind of crap, and it spanned like two core and eight boosters (also over the span of about 2 years).

Though the real problem with L5R's second storyline was that they switched to a new release schedule mechanic they called "Rolling Thunder", which was like the CCG equivalent of episodic games. The first booster "set" was more like seven smaller sets released one a month. And literally everyone hated it, which drove a lot of players away from the game right when they should have been capitalizing on their prior success to grow the fanbase even more.



Zeus posted...
WhiskeyDisk posted...
As a non-player, PO...I understood some of those words from context clues, but if we're being honest you could have literally made half of that post up out of thin air and I'd have had the same reaction to it. I doubt you're screwing with me, but for all intents and purposes, the best I can do is smile and nod and say...ok.

The important takeaway is that a game like MtG rather uniquely facilitates all kinds of play styles, which you don't necessarily see in other CCGs. And, because the way MtG is structured, it also has more play options than other CCGs when it comes to things like group play (which is difficult to do at all with some CCGs).

In a way, it's like the people who play Fairy Chess. Adding new pieces that do different things changes the dynamic of play, and the fact that everyone at the table has a different deck means that you've got asynchronous play.
"Wall of Text'D!" --- oldskoolplayr76
"POwned again." --- blight family
(edited 1 month ago)

User Info: I_Abibde

I_Abibde
1 month ago#258
ParanoidObsessive posted...
I feel like your timing is off there...?

It most likely is. I'm starting to think there's a rule of the universe that makes me forget things just enough that you have to correct me. :-P
-- I Abibde / Samuraiter
Laughing at Game FAQs since 2002.

User Info: Zeus

Zeus
1 month ago#259
Thanks to Disney+ -- and my brother who got a free year of Disney+ from his cable provider or something then gave me his login -- I finally watched "The Book Job" from Simpsons season 23, which was hilarious right down to the throwaway jokes ("There's no law against sleeping inside a tyrannosaurus head."
"That's an allosaurus head."
"I want to call my paleontologist.")

Then I rewatched Treehouse 11 (still pretty fun) and Treehouse 15 (eh)
(\/)(\/)|-|
There are precious few at ease / With moral ambiguities / So we act as though they don't exist.
Zeus posted...
and my brother who gave me his login

ILLEGAL!

~reports you~
"Wall of Text'D!" --- oldskoolplayr76
"POwned again." --- blight family
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