A Geektivus For The Rest Of Us

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CyborgSage00x0 posted...
Animorphs, baby.

Like most things that 90s kids still love and remember fondly, that came a bit too late for me to ever care. I was already in college by the time the first book came out, and already of legal drinking age by the time it got a TV show.

And speaking of things 90s kids are always nostalgic about...



Zeus posted...
Some of RL Stine's stuff is still fun as well (not his attempt at an adult novel, mind you), both in terms of his YA novels (although he *always* kept things very PG despite writing about high schoolers) and his children's works like Goosebumps.

I know I've brought it up before, but Goosebumps is another of those things that just sort of missed me. I was around 15 when the first book came out (and in college by the time they did the TV show), and by then I'd already stopped visiting the kids or "young adult" sections of bookstores entirely (I think I was already reading Roger Zelazny and Stephen Donaldson by that point, and I was definitely already reading Isaac Asimov and Fred Saberhagen).

To this day, when I think R.L. Stine my brain immediately goes to the Choose-Your-Own-Adventure style books he wrote in the 80s, of which I had (and still have - I've literally never sold or thrown out a book in my life) about 12:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R._L._Stine#Twist-a-plot
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R._L._Stine#Find_Your_Fate
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R._L._Stine#Wizards,_Warriors_and_You
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R._L._Stine#G.I._Joe:_Find_Your_Fate

In a related vein, whenever someone brings up "Are You Afraid of the Dark?", my brain basically goes "Nope, I was too old for that". Though with that one, if it had come out of a couple years earlier, it might have managed to catch me.

Same deal with Power Rangers - it was probably a couple years too late to really catch my attention.



WhiskeyDisk posted...
Hell, I'd almost put Shel Silverstein on that list too if we're being honest...

Ehh, if you look into Shel Silverstein's actual career and don't just equate him with "The Giving Tree" and nothing else, it's kind of hard to even CONSIDER him a children's writer (at least for me). At least in the sense that there's a difference between "person who has written at least one book for children" and "someone whose entire career is mostly based on writing multiple books for children."

He was kind of a Renaissance man who drew cartoons and wrote songs as well as wrote books, almost all of which was squarely aimed at adults (a lot of his comics were drawn for Playboy). And he basically had to be talked into writing kids' books in the first place, so it sort of feels like he was never all that defined by the idea.

Also, knowing that, it can give you even more insight into the stuff he DID write for kids, and you can read it with a more critical eye and wonder just how subversive he was deliberately being when he wrote it.

"Wall of Text'D!" --- oldskoolplayr76
"POwned again." --- blight family

User Info: Zeus

Zeus
3 months ago#122
ParanoidObsessive posted...
Like most things that 90s kids still love and remember fondly, that came a bit too late for me to ever care. I was already in college by the time the first book came out, and already of legal drinking age by the time it got a TV show.


tbh, I think the reason I didn't get more into that was I may have been reaching the tail-end of the age group by that point. My brother and his friend were both into it, although I don't think it lasted. At first, I had partly snubbed my nose at the series, but I read a few of the books and kinda liked them.

I can't recall ever watching the show.

ParanoidObsessive posted...
And speaking of things 90s kids are always nostalgic about...


I thought you hated the term and concept of 90s kids, yet here you are using it >_>

ParanoidObsessive posted...
I know I've brought it up before, but Goosebumps is another of those things that just sort of missed me. I was around 15 when the first book came out (and in college by the time they did the TV show), and by then I'd already stopped visiting the kids or "young adult" sections of bookstores entirely (I think I was already reading Roger Zelazny and Stephen Donaldson by that point, and I was definitely already reading Isaac Asimov and Fred Saberhagen).

To this day, when I think R.L. Stine my brain immediately goes to the Choose-Your-Own-Adventure style books he wrote in the 80s, of which I had (and still have - I've literally never sold or thrown out a book in my life) about 12:


Did you also just skip the Fear Street series? Seems like you would have been *right* in that demo, considering it was aimed a bit older (overlooking that Stine generally shied from mature situations) and came out a bit sooner.

Otherwise I'm not sure what CYOAs he wrote, although I'm guessing it was a knockoff series? I can't seem to find anything listed in his bibliography.

ParanoidObsessive posted...
In a related vein, whenever someone brings up "Are You Afraid of the Dark?", my brain basically goes "Nope, I was too old for that". Though with that one, if it had come out of a couple years earlier, it might have managed to catch me.


Honestly, a few of the episodes hold up reasonably well regardless of age. While Goosebumps was decidedly kiddy, AYAOTD catered more to teens. The biggest drawback was the framing campfire story setting which added absolutely nothing to the episodes and frequently foreshadowed a twist.

ParanoidObsessive posted...
Ehh, if you look into Shel Silverstein's actual career and don't just equate him with "The Giving Tree" and nothing else, it's kind of hard to even CONSIDER him a children's writer (at least for me). At least in the sense that there's a difference between "person who has written at least one book for children" and "someone whose entire career is mostly based on writing multiple books for children."


And then you have the camp of frustrated children's writers, where they didn't necessarily want their career to be about writing for children but that's what they were associated with (the previously mentioned Roald Dahl being a great example -- people *only* associate him with children's books and, as a result, wrongly assume that his other works were meant for kids even if the story is about human taxidermy or marital cannibalism)
(\/)(\/)|-|
There are precious few at ease / With moral ambiguities / So we act as though they don't exist.
(edited 3 months ago)

User Info: Zeus

Zeus
3 months ago#123
Speaking of things PO doesn't care about, my "China version" Nendoroid Cynthia and Garchomp set arrived today. And, for what's almost certainly a bootleg (or, at the very least, an off-hours additional production run), it actually looks pretty good. The quality seems to be considerably better than my "China version" of Nendoroid Red, with the only real issue so far being that the lining to her jacket isn't glued on or something so it popped out of place I removed her head (which is necessarily to change the faceplates),

Admittedly, I got it more for the Garchomp, which is one of my favorite Pokemon. While his paint apps aren't perfect (minor levels of bleed that you wouldn't find on the official product), he's otherwise great. The joints are a little junky as well, although I'm not sure how much better the original might be.

And, for anybody wondering why risk a bootleg, it's because I paid $13 shipped for this whereas the official item on the Pokecenter runs $50 *before* shipping
https://www.pokemoncenter.com/figures---pins/figures/nendoroid/nendoroid%3A-cynthia-posable-figure-703-01627

While I'm finicky when it comes to quality, I tend to relax a little when I'm paying around a quarter of the price (when you count shipping). And, speaking of bargains, Toys "R" Us has been clearancing out its Skylanders stuff and some of its Disney Infinity figures. While I thought I'd never find a cheaper deal than BestBuy's buck each clearance last year (or early this year?), TRU had it topped by clearancing the older stuff for 50-cents apiece. Only drawback was that not much was left, although I grabbed some SwapForce stuff I didn't have. Then, of course, the Disney Infinity stuff was pretty much gone. Amusingly, if I had waited to buy a starter pack, guess I could have saved myself an extra $8 -- and here I thought I got a good deal when I paid $10! (Actually, might have even been $15. Can't remember.) Since I never opened the box, I could have just waited.

...and speaking of not opening boxes, just remembered how few Nendoroids I've actually removed from their packaging. Meh.
(\/)(\/)|-|
There are precious few at ease / With moral ambiguities / So we act as though they don't exist.
(edited 3 months ago)

User Info: CyborgSage00x0

CyborgSage00x0
3 months ago#124
Fair enough, PO.

I actually think all of the AYAotD episodes are on Youtube, actually. I found most to still hold up, despite some 90's cringe.
PotD's resident Film Expert. Steelers:13-3. Next up: Jaguars, Round 2.
Zeus posted...
I thought you hated the term and concept of 90s kids, yet here you are using it >_>

You might be confusing me with someone else - I've never had a problem with the term or concept of "90s kids". In fact, I've argued that it's a far more accurate and meaningful demographic than trying to break down people into the old "Gen X/Gen Y/Millennial" categories, because those are more rooted in older generational cohorts, and I don't think those apply as well any more in the age of television-spurred pop culture and rapid turnover.

Breaking people into 20-year or 30-year generational groups worked well enough in the past when the pace of life and current events moved slower, but is far less useful in the modern world where worldview can entirely shift in the span of a single decade. At the moment defining people more as "80s kid/90s kid/00s kid/etc" seems to be a more effective breakdown (and in the future, we may have to granulate that even more down to, say, "early XX kid/late XX kid" if the pace of cultural shift grows even faster due to the Internet - conversely, the Internet and diversification of pop culture in general may render generational cohorts almost meaningless as every individual sort of grows up in their own self-selected bubble of awareness).

On the other hand, I DO s*** on "90s kids" all the time in the sense that they seem to be the largest concentration of people active online in social media spaces, whereas almost all of my childhood nostalgia is rooted in the 80s. So every time someone goes "Ooooh, look, nostalgia!", I'm usually like "Ehh, f*** you, junior."



Zeus posted...
Did you also just skip the Fear Street series? Seems like you would have been *right* in that demo, considering it was aimed a bit older (overlooking that Stine generally shied from mature situations) and came out a bit sooner.

I feel like it wasn't as mainstream as Goosebumps became, so in turn it wasn't really as culturally ubiquitous, and thus, easier to miss. That, combined with the fact that I was never really into horror all that much (I went hard into fantasy pretty early and just never came back, at least were fiction is concerned), means it wasn't really on my radar until it was already too late for me to really appreciate it.

I feel like my "young horror phase" pretty much started and ended with this:

http://www.amazon.com/Still-More-Tales-Midnight-Hour/dp/0590420275
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tales_for_the_Midnight_Hour



Zeus posted...
Otherwise I'm not sure what CYOAs he wrote, although I'm guessing it was a knockoff series? I can't seem to find anything listed in his bibliography.

I said "CYOA-style" books. As in books that have the "make a choice and turn to page X" mechanic, but not necessarily books that were released under the actual CYOA brand.

There were literally hundreds of series that followed that model (which is why http://gamebooks.org exists to catalogue all of them), and I personally owned (and still own) books from dozens of different series (I have a bookcase with about 4 full shelves just devoted to them, and they were like 98% of my childhood book buying from age 9 to around 12).

In R.L. Stine's specific case, I literally listed links directly below that sentence that link to pretty much every book like that he wrote. Conversely, I could also have posted this:

http://gamebooks.org/Person/644

His brother and sister-and-law also used to write those kind of books as a pair around the same time:

http://gamebooks.org/Person/648

"Wall of Text'D!" --- oldskoolplayr76
"POwned again." --- blight family

User Info: Zeus

Zeus
3 months ago#126
ParanoidObsessive posted...
Breaking people into 20-year or 30-year generational groups worked well enough in the past when the pace of life and current events moved slower, but is far less useful in the modern world where worldview can entirely shift in the span of a single decade. At the moment defining people more as "80s kid/90s kid/00s kid/etc" seems to be a more effective breakdown (and in the future, we may have to granulate that even more down to, say, "early XX kid/late XX kid" if the pace of cultural shift grows even faster due to the Internet - conversely, the Internet and diversification of pop culture in general may render generational cohorts almost meaningless as every individual sort of grows up in their own self-selected bubble of awareness).


I can *almost* understand it as an entertainment cohort, but I don't really see it being anything past that. Most actual prevailing trends continue far longer -- and persist after a starting point -- while many of the characterizations at the decade or generation level tend to be complete bunk.

As for the generation system being less relevant today due to society moving faster, I don't believe that for a second. It's more a matter of *why* it exists in the first place since the idea really works well when a generation is born roughly the same time then falls apart because the birthrate isn't consistent.

In general, your cut-off seems far shorter. I often get the impression you only got into half a decade or something.

ParanoidObsessive posted...
On the other hand, I DO s*** on "90s kids" all the time in the sense that they seem to be the largest concentration of people active online in social media spaces, whereas almost all of my childhood nostalgia is rooted in the 80s. So every time someone goes "Ooooh, look, nostalgia!", I'm usually like "Ehh, f*** you, junior."


I still cringe whenever anybody calls the N64 "retro"

ParanoidObsessive posted...
I feel like my "young horror phase" pretty much started and ended with this:

http://www.amazon.com/Still-More-Tales-Midnight-Hour/dp/0590420275
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tales_for_the_Midnight_Hour


Not bad books, tbh, for what they are. Granted, quite a few of the stories were just so-so retellings of urban legends (kind of like Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark, although at least that had the artwork).

I read a considerable number of horror anthologies as a kid -- including many which I assume were YA -- and, to my eternal annoyance, I can't figure out the names, etc, for most of them, through the usual google tricks.

Kind of the same issue with scifi, although it's easier to locate the stories because scifi is much better supported or perhaps because I was I lucked into more famous authors.

ParanoidObsessive posted...
I said "CYOA-style" books. As in books that have the "make a choice and turn to page X" mechanic, but not necessarily books that were released under the actual CYOA brand.


Of that I was aware. I, too, read a lot of originals and knockoffs as a kid.

ParanoidObsessive posted...
In R.L. Stine's specific case, I literally listed links directly below that sentence that link to pretty much every book like that he wrote. Conversely, I could also have posted this:


Eh, I think after noticing that I immediately jumped to his wikipedia page because I hadn't heard such a thing and afterward moved past the links (or just ADHD'd out). That or a perception filter was hiding them.
(\/)(\/)|-|
There are precious few at ease / With moral ambiguities / So we act as though they don't exist.
(edited 3 months ago)

User Info: The Wave Master

The Wave Master
3 months ago#127
Thanks for keeping the topic going. My wife and I have been really sick with the flu and resulting upper respiratory Infections.

I have managed to get some quality time In With Persona 5, and I really do love the game.

Other than persona, I have been watching AGDQ on twitch. I donated a few bucks to support the charity and the event and staff. I know charities are mostly scans, but I enjoyed the show and hard work that goes into the event so I donated.

How is everyone else doing?
We are who we choose to be.

User Info: Zeus

Zeus
3 months ago#128
Has anybody been following the Woken Matt stuff? Kept meaning to and forgetting. Has anything much happened so far?

The Wave Master posted...
How is everyone else doing?


https://i.imgur.com/sm8gPFO.gif
(\/)(\/)|-|
There are precious few at ease / With moral ambiguities / So we act as though they don't exist.

User Info: Zeus

Zeus
3 months ago#129
HBR ran a piece discussing the relative valuation of digital vs physical ownership:
https://hbr.org/2017/12/customers-wont-pay-as-much-for-digital-goods-and-research-explains-why

tbh, I've *never* considered digital products as being equal to physical because the cost to the company is generally far less. When a company saves money, part of that savings should be passed along to the consumer.

Otherwise, like the article notes, there's no real tangible feeling of ownership when it comes to digital goods. I'm a very tactile person. I like to be able to feel things. Plus having the physical representation of the object around reminds you that it's yours. So even though I'm often drowning in stuff, I'd still rather go physical over digital.
(\/)(\/)|-|
There are precious few at ease / With moral ambiguities / So we act as though they don't exist.

User Info: The Wave Master

The Wave Master
3 months ago#130
Maybe I am not hip anymore, but when I was kid we never ate freaking washing detergent for fun.

We had sex, we fought over Starter Jackets, we played the same video game and CD over and over again because it's all we had. We occassuonaly rioted when we were fed up with race issues. We had bad hair and bad clothes.

But we dis not eat Tide Pods on a dare. My God.

Anyway, in gaming news I played the Dragonball Fightetz beta, and I had a lot of fun. Very simple fighting system to grasp, but a lot of deep nuisance in the system. Plus adult Gohan is cool in the game.

I'm thinking about buying the full game in a few weeks if I finish with Persona 5, or I might wait on a discount before diving in, and I still have a stack of games to play.
We are who we choose to be.
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