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  3. Is "look" a commonly overused word?

User Info: rodman870

rodman870
3 years ago#11
Senel Coolidge posted...
Especially in what I assume is 50,000 words


It's actually 110,000 words right now, so I guess that's a little better. But, yeah, I'll take everyone's advice and just worry about it in editing, but be aware that it's a possible issue in my writing process.

User Info: SamuriChameleon

SamuriChameleon
3 years ago#12
I noticed the same thing with me. With sight looks, I'm guessing you're probably doing it to start off describing something. If that's the case, then sometimes you can eliminate "look" by jumping right into the description. When you say something like, "The cabinet had a dick drawn on it," it's understood that this cabinet has come to your character's attention. Else, why would you describe it?
"Meaning is subjective and therefore meaningless."

User Info: Hinakuluiau

Hinakuluiau
3 years ago#13
The Muffin Lord Bob posted...
As an action, to look is fine. As a description, it's telling instead of showing. If you say, "he looked angry", it does nothing for the reader. Let them infer the emotion from vivid physical detail.


Telling has its place, in some sentences it can be better than showing.
I like volcanoes.

User Info: slumpcat

slumpcat
3 years ago#14
It's better to use "look" 600 times than to use 600 variations of this:

tigerslashII posted...
Glanced, stared, eyeballed, glowered, searched, gazed
hot-blooded canadian folk hero

User Info: rodman870

rodman870
3 years ago#15
SamuriChameleon posted...
When you say something like, "The cabinet had a dick drawn on it," it's understood that this cabinet has come to your character's attention. Else, why would you describe it?


Yeah, which that's one of those things where I'm just gonna have to review my writing style. I'm pretty sure a lot of them are "He looked at this, begin describing this." The other most common is looking at someone, then describing their expression/body language/etc. It's probably the same.

It's better to use "look" 600 times than to use 600 variations of this:


I agree. I think sometimes people try too hard to spice up their writing, but it just ends up distracting. Better than using some 10 dollar synonym that a linguist has to pick up a dictionary for, I guess.

User Info: alt_reality

alt_reality
3 years ago#16
"At first, she looked fine, although slightly unhealthy..."

This is kind of contradictory...

"He looked around the room to find his keys."

I can't sense any urgency here; should there be a sense of urgency? "looked' in this instance is not very descriptive.

"They looked down at the tattoo again."

How did they look down at the tattoo the first time? Probably do whatever they did the first time, rather than playing Synonym Roulette.

"...his features faltered and he gave the girls a stern look."

Glare, scowl, grimaced at would all be acceptable; a "stern look" is different from a "look" so you can get away with Synonym Roulette.

"He looked between the two as if they were actors on stage."

I would need more context but I feel like this should probably be rephrased.

"She looked over at him, causing Jim to snap..."

The mere sight of her glance caused Jim to lose his cool. (Okay that was a rough first pass at it but this can probably be rephrased.)

"He looked over his shoulder and prayed no one would walk in."

Should be fine.

"She loosened her stance and looked at him."

How did she look at him? Also "loosened her stance"? Let her guard down, maybe? Relaxed?

"He began to look back at her, but..."

Would need context

"He looked to his left again to see if he could spot her."

He tried to spot her in the crowd but...

"He looked around and realized he was alone."

Fine, I guess?

"I'm sorry, I'm just looking for my sister."

That sounds like normal people speak.
"A spoon? For your soup? Aren't we the fine nobleman." -Pohl, Suikoden II
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