2 months ago #1
If you’re American like me, you know we do this with all types of other cultures here in the U.S.A. Famously, in Chinese NBA player Yao Ming’s first game in Miami on December 16, 2002, the Heat passed out 8,000 fortune cookies, an East Asian cultural stereotype. However, Yao was not offended by the promotion because he was not familiar with American stereotypes of Chinese. Fortune cookies are maybe the most prominent example but you see it everywhere with places like Taco Bell which sells very Americanized, nonauthentic “Mexican food”.

Anyway, this is the reverse of that, what people in other countries think of supposed traditional American food. One of the first examples given is how in Japan they, despite having a low percentage of Christians in the population, celebrate Christmas and do so with the “traditional American Xmas feast” of…a bucket of fried chicken….

Apparently that was all started by the first businessman to own a KFC in Japan, back in the 1970s.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=7Xgd79wuriQ#dialog
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Previous Versions
2 months ago
If you’re American like me, you know we do this with all types of other cultures here in the U.S.A. Famously, in Chinese NBA player Yao Ming’s first game in Miami on December 16, 2002, the Heat passed out 8,000 fortune cookies, an East Asian cultural stereotype. However, Yao was not offended by the promotion because he was not familiar with American stereotypes of Chinese. Fortune cookies are maybe the most prominent example but you see it everywhere with places like Taco Bell which sells very Americanized, nonauthentic “Mexican food”.

Anyway, this is the reverse of that, what people in other countries think of supposed traditional American food. One of the first examples given is how in Japan they, despite having a low percentage of Christians in the population, celebrate Christmas and do so with the “traditional American Xmas feast” of…a bucket of fried chicken….

Apparently that was all started by the first businessman to own a KFC in Japan, back in the 1970s.