2 months ago #10
actarus posted...
IAn example of Gospel harmony or Chronological gospels in one is from Andre Dellerba
"HOLY GOSPELS IN ONE 2018 by Andre Dellerba"

"The unique colour coding enables cross referencing of each word or phrase from Matthew (Blue), Mark (Green), Luke (Red) and John (Purple). If there is a common sentence in the Gospels then that sentence which is most complete is used. If another Gospel has a word or phrase which is unique, then that word or phrase is added to that sentence. For example, Luke 23:25b; John 19:16; Matthew 27:31; and Mark 15:20: "

In my translation are the topic-titles the same if the event is the same:
But keep in your mind that there are similar events:
Sermon on the Mount by Matthew Vs Sermon on the Plain (plateau) by Luke
First cleansing of the Temple in John 2 Vs Cleansing of the Temple by the other Gospels

There is also harmony from Galvin for e-Sword PC

Using your example of the blind beggar (Mat 20:29-34 Mark 10:46-52 Luke 18:35-43)
How do you think that you can synchronise it into one text?

Keep in mind that I'm looking at my file from 2016 for the first time.

First to note, I actually have from/to Jericho highlighted as an unresolved conflict (were they heading to Jericho, or leaving it?). On that note, I don't know if I buy into the theory that there were two Jerichos, and am unsure whether or not I'm willing to accept that one of the writers got it "wrong."

That being said, the way I synchronized the one/two blind men difference is as follows:

"And as He was leaving/drawing near to Jericho with His disciples (and a great crowd following behind them), there were two blind men sitting by the roadsite, one of which who was Bartimaeus ("the son of Timaeus"), a blind beggar."

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In general, where there are number differences (i.e., how many blind men; how many guys in the tomb of Jesus on Sunday morning, etc.), I go with the one that doesn't exclude the other.

For some reason Matthew tells us that there two blind men in this story, and rather than going with "he got it wrong, because Luke/Mark only mention one!," I prefer to keep all their words and reconcile the differences, if possible.

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In this example, it is reasonable, for me, to think that there were two men, but that only one of them was known by the authors.
"Man will not live off of bread alone, but by every word proceeding through the mouth of God." "You are not able to serve God and wealth.".

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2 months ago
actarus posted...
IAn example of Gospel harmony or Chronological gospels in one is from Andre Dellerba
"HOLY GOSPELS IN ONE 2018 by Andre Dellerba"

"The unique colour coding enables cross referencing of each word or phrase from Matthew (Blue), Mark (Green), Luke (Red) and John (Purple). If there is a common sentence in the Gospels then that sentence which is most complete is used. If another Gospel has a word or phrase which is unique, then that word or phrase is added to that sentence. For example, Luke 23:25b; John 19:16; Matthew 27:31; and Mark 15:20: "

In my translation are the topic-titles the same if the event is the same:
But keep in your mind that there are similar events:
Sermon on the Mount by Matthew Vs Sermon on the Plain (plateau) by Luke
First cleansing of the Temple in John 2 Vs Cleansing of the Temple by the other Gospels

There is also harmony from Galvin for e-Sword PC

Using your example of the blind beggar (Mat 20:29-34 Mark 10:46-52 Luke 18:35-43)
How do you think that you can synchronise it into one text?

Keep in mind that I'm looking at my file from 2016 for the first time.

First to note, I actually have from/to Jericho highlighted as an unresolved conflict (were they heading to Jericho, or leaving it?). on that note, I don't know if I buy into the theory that there were two Jerichos, and am unsure whether or not I'm willing to accept that one of the writers got it "wrong."

That being said, the way I synchronized the one/two blind men difference is as follows:

"And as He was leaving/drawing near to Jericho with His disciples (and a great crowd following behind them), there were two blind men sitting by the roadsite, one of which who was Bartimaeus ("the son of Timaeus"), a blind beggar."

==========

In general, where there are number differences (i.e., how many blind men; how many guys in the tomb of Jesus on Sunday morning, etc.), I go with the one that doesn't exclude the other.

For some reason Matthew tells us that there two blind men in this story, and rather than going with "he got it wrong, because Luke/Mark only mention one!," I prefer to keep all their words and reconcile the differences, if possible.

=========

In this example, it is reasonable, for me, to think that there were two men, but that only one of them was known by the authors.