2 months ago #1
My basic answer to the problem of evil is that it is entirely conceivable that God had a good reason to allow suffering in the world, that the good in our lives ultimately outweighs the bad. God saw that the good would outweigh the bad, so he decided to create us.

My contention in this topic is that my continued living, instead of opting out via suicide, is a lived-out proposition in which I express agreement with the proposition that the good outweighs the bad in my world. I choose to continue living, whether because I actually enjoy life enough or because, even if I would personally prefer death, I know my death would hurt other people and I value them more than I dislike the suffering I experience. Either way, I am saying that there is some good out there, whether my good or the good of others, which is greater than the suffering of the world.

In brief, if people truly believed that the bad outweighed the good, they would commit suicide.

Since most don’t, they implicitly agree that, at the very least, the good outweighs the bad. Or, I suppose, if the good does not currently outweigh the bad, there is hope, a chance, that it could within their lifetime, whether by their own efforts or by some external force. Either way, I think the precept that ‘actions speak louder than words’ is applicable here.

I am assuming here that most individuals, at a certain point in their life, have the means to commit suicide. Most who truly want to commit suicide do so. Of course, unsuccessful suicide attempts exist, but in many of those cases I think part of the reason is due to lack of putting forth full effort. Not all the time, but often. I could be wrong here, but it doesn’t negate the argument entirely. It just narrows down the number of people it is applicable to. I don’t know the numbers, but I imagine that the percentage of the population that has attempted suicide, whether successfully or not, constitutes a sizable minority.
'Tis so sweet to trust in Jesus, just to take him at his word.
Just to rest upon his promise, just to know, "Thus saith the Lord."

Previous Versions
2 months ago
My basic answer to the problem of evil is that it is entirely conceivable that God had a good reason to allow suffering in the world, that the good in our lives ultimately outweighs the bad. God saw that the good would outweigh the bad, so he decided to create us.

My contention in this topic is my continued living, instead of opting out via suicide, is a lived-out proposition in which I express agreement with the proposition that the good outweighs the bad in my world. I choose to continue living, whether because I actually enjoy life enough or because, even if I would personally prefer death, I know my death would hurt other people and I value them more than I dislike the suffering I experience. Either way, I am saying that there is some good out there, whether my good or the good of others, which is greater than the suffering of the world.

In brief, if people truly believed that the bad outweighed the good, they would commit suicide.

Since most don’t, they implicitly agree that, at the very least, the good outweighs the bad. Or, I suppose, if the good does not currently outweigh the bad, there is hope, a chance, that it could within their lifetime, whether by their own efforts or by some external force. Either way, I think the precept that ‘actions speak louder than words’ is applicable here.

I am assuming here that most individuals, at a certain point in their life, have the means to commit suicide. Most who truly want to commit suicide do so. Of course, unsuccessful suicide attempts exist, but in many of those cases I think part of the reason is due to lack of putting forth full effort. Not all the time, but often. I could be wrong here, but it doesn’t negate the argument entirely. It just narrows down the number of people it is applicable to. I don’t know the numbers, but I imagine that the percentage of the population that has attempted suicide, whether successfully or not, constitutes a sizable minority.