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  3. I want to read the Bible.

User Info: PumpkinBelmont

PumpkinBelmont
1 month ago#1
But I find it very difficult and hard to read. I wasn't raised religious but I'm very interested. Any advice?

User Info: JDavidC

JDavidC
1 month ago#2
There are various online Bibles, which may be easier to read through. There are some sites that may even offer different versions that you can cross-reference with each other. Be aware that different versions will say different things, and I believe that the original documents that made up the books of the Bible have been lost, so be wary in case you read something that wasn't there in the original documents (I personally believe most, if not all, Bibles have been corrupted in at least one way). Just make sure to think critically and pay attention to context when trying to figure out what is going on. Some parts are good as moral guidance, but others have God behaving in utterly incomprehensible ways that are at odds with his teachings.
3DS FC: 3093-7112-3992

User Info: zinformant

zinformant
1 month ago#3
Do not read cover to cover or in any sequential fashion (as you'll drown in Judges or, if lucky, 1 Kings). It may behoove you to study central tenets of the faith first and use that background to dive deeper. Better yet, use a study guide of some kind and check citations when something interests you. You don't even need a Bible with the Internet at your fingertips, thus producing Matthew 5 instantly. Regarding translations, King James is amusing poetry at best; find a more modern one.
Is it naive to dream of a world without war?

User Info: JDavidC

JDavidC
1 month ago#4
Some of the stuff may be better off being skim read, like genealogies. There is some stuff in there that would be little more than boring lists of events.
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User Info: PumpkinBelmont

PumpkinBelmont
1 month ago#5
Thanks for the advice, I didn't realize it was going to be this difficult to dive in. One that I tried to read was King James and I found it exceptionally difficult to read.

Another concern I have, which you actually mentioned, is that I don't want to read someone else's interpretation. I'd like it as unfiltered as possible, that being said anything like that would probably be way out of my grasp for understanding.

User Info: the_hedonist

the_hedonist
1 month ago#6
Whatever book of the Bible you read, check out the video(s) The Bible Project made for them first. They cover every book of the Bible and make a broad overview of each book. It won’t help you understand every verse, but to have a broad understanding before diving in can be very helpful.

https://thebibleproject.com/explore/
'Tis so sweet to trust in Jesus, just to take him at his word.
Just to rest upon his promise, just to know, "Thus saith the Lord."

User Info: OrangeWizard

OrangeWizard
1 month ago#7
PumpkinBelmont posted...
is that I don't want to read someone else's interpretation.


Step 1: learn Hebrew and Greek...

If that would take too long, then you may wish to consider making your peace with interpretations.

Other than that, you can read "Young's Literal translation"
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamic_and_formal_equivalence
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Young%27s_Literal_Translation#Translation_philosophy

Which, as the title implies, tries to be a literal translation, even when it means not being grammatically correct in English. This might, however, end up being harder for you to read. You need to balance "literalness" and difficulty. The more literal, the more difficult. The less difficult, the less literal.

For example, there are bible translations in Japanese that use "rice" instead of "bread", because the Japanese are more familiar with the former than the latter, especially historically. One might more easily understand that what was eaten in a certain passage is "the common thing to eat", and not come away with the wrong conclusion that what was being eaten was something luxurious, foreign, or particularly special.
(edited 1 month ago)

User Info: SSj4Wingzero

SSj4Wingzero
1 month ago#8
Yup. That's what makes translation a very nuanced art. Translating certain idioms, for example, is damn near impossible.

For example, in English, we have the phrase, "Speak of the Devil and he shall appear."

In Chinese, their equivalent is, "Speak of Cao Cao and he shall arrive." Cao Cao is the name of a 3rd century warlord who, in a 16th century novel, was portrayed as a villainous character. But much like we're not familiar with this historical figure, folks in China aren't really familiar with the Devil as we are in Western culture, so the idiom doesn't *really* translate. And that's just modern Chinese!

Imagine what it's like to translate Hebrew references from 2500 years ago, about aspects of culture which haven't existed for thousands of years, with references to places that are lost to history or no longer exist in that form. Terrifying. That's why many literal translations are difficult to read, and that's also why some dynamic equivalence translations may come across as not particularly formal. Many books of the Bible are quite poetic in nature, and whereas a literal translation might try to do a word-for-word equivalence, a dynamic translation would try to retain the flow/feeling of the passage, and neither is exactly 100% accurate when it comes to conveying the emotion/thoughts/message of the author.
Not changing this sig until the Knicks win the NBA Championship! Started...4/23/2011? Or was it 2010?
(edited 1 month ago)

User Info: 3127

3127
1 month ago#9
I grew up familiar with the Bible, especially Revelations, Genesis, Exodus, and the gospels. When I eventually decided to read the entire thing, I read the King James Version of the Old Testament front to back. What an epic experience that was. I learned how absolutely badass YHVH was in those stories. Then I did the same with the New Testament. It took me on a journey.

Over the course of it all I wrote down countless notes over all kinds of things I was interested in. Books of the Bible that were mentioned but weren’t actually in there, powers that YHVH wielded against humans, instances where the phrase “Glory of God” was utilized, actual descriptions of angels, names that sounded badass, words or names that required further research, etc...
331212777

User Info: SSj4Wingzero

SSj4Wingzero
1 month ago#10
If you grew up familiar with the Bible, then you should know it's "Revelation", not "Revelations".

I kid, I kid.
Not changing this sig until the Knicks win the NBA Championship! Started...4/23/2011? Or was it 2010?
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