2 months ago #9
    GnosticBishop posted...
    Ancient history is interesting but we live in a whole new world.


    This is not "ancient history." These were decisions made in the 20th century whose fallout still affects us today. We supported repressive secular regimes in the Middle East during the 20th century and we're dealing with the fallout of it RIGHT NOW still.

    The whole notion that prohibiting religious displays will somehow prevent extremist violence is nonsense. If you actually bother to read up on the profiles of the young men who became terrorists and jihadists, you will find that the overwhelming majority of them were not religious. They had no connection to local mosques, no involvement in religious affairs, and certainly no background in religious education. Oftentimes, when these people commit acts of terror, news media tracks down their friends and associates. What's often heard? "I had no idea he was even religious, let alone part of an Islamist terror group."

    For example, the ringleader of the Paris attacks was a terrorist named Abdelhamid Abaaoud. A real scumbag, of course. News media would have you think that he was radicalized because of tensions between Islam and Western society, but the thing is, he attended a Catholic school growing up. His parents were not particularly religious. For most of his life, he smoked a ton of weed and partied a hell of a lot. Limiting displays of religion wouldn't have affected him; he spent more time partying at clubs than he did at mosques. He started getting into trouble - petty thefts, assaults, that sort of stuff. All of a sudden, within the span of a year, he becomes radicalized and goes to Syria. I'm trying to look up if he was ever part of a Mosque in Belgium or France, but it doesn't appear to be the case. For the overwhelming majority of his life, this man had barely any connection to religion, and within a year he becomes a terrorist who orchestrates the deaths of hundreds of innocent people.

    If you look up the bios of people who join up with terrorist groups, they're all very similar. In fact, many studies have shown that having a strong religious identity and strong ties to a local religious organization actually *prevents* you from being radicalized.
    Not changing this sig until the Knicks win the NBA Championship! Started...4/23/2011? Or was it 2010?

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    2 months ago
    GnosticBishop posted...
    Ancient history is interesting but we live in a whole new world.


    This is not "ancient history." These were decisions made in the 20th century whose fallout still affects us today. We supported repressive secular regimes in the Middle East during the 20th century and we're dealing with the fallout of it RIGHT NOW still.

    The whole notion that prohibiting religious displays will somehow prevent extremist violence is nonsense. If you actually bother to read up on the profiles of the young men who became terrorists and jihadists, you will find that the overwhelming majority of them were not religious. They had no connection to local mosques, no involvement in religious affairs, and certainly no background in religious education. Oftentimes, when these people commit acts of terror, news media tracks down their friends and associates. What's often heard? "I had no idea he was even religious, let alone part of an Islamist terror group."

    For example, the ringleader of the Paris attacks was a terrorist named Abdelhamid Abaaoud. A real scumbag, of course. News media would have you think that he was radicalized because of tensions between Islam and Western society, but the thing is, he attended a Catholic school growing up. His parents were not particularly religious. For most of his life, he smoked a ton of weed and partied a hell of a lot. Limiting displays of religion wouldn't have affected him; he spent more time partying at clubs than he did at mosques. He started getting into trouble - petty thefts, assaults, that sort of stuff. All of a sudden, within the span of a year, he becomes radicalized and goes to Syria. I'm trying to look up if he was ever part of a Mosque in Belgium or France, but it doesn't appear to be the case. For the overwhelming majority of his life, this man had barely any connection to religion, and within a year he becomes a terrorist who orchestrates the deaths of hundreds of innocent people.

    If you look up the bios of people who join up with terrorist groups, they're all very similar. In fact, many studies have shown that having a strong religious identify actually *prevents* you from being radicalized.