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  3. Would a ban on all public religious representations and displays ease religious

User Info: GnosticBishop

GnosticBishop
1 month ago#1
Would a ban on all public religious representations and displays ease religious hatreds and violence?

We have to end inquisitions and jihads of all kinds, including the less lethal ones like homophobia and misogyny.

Some secular governments, led by the French of France and Quebec, are implementing bans on all religious iconography prayers and emblems and religious displays so as to ease religious tensions and violence. They call it laïcité, which translates to secularism. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La%C3%AFcit%C3%A9

The general secular population seems to dislike the one-upmanship that the religious practice on other religions, as well as those who do not follow a religion; even though statistics show that the less religion in a nation, the more peaceful and law abiding it is. Conversely, if we look at the Christian nation of the U.S., as an example; we see perhaps the least peaceful and law abiding nation on earth. This last aside, an example of this one-upmanship, would be Christian signage that tells us to turn to Jesus or be condemned and Muslim head gear and face covering that say that the wearer is more chastely than those who do not cover their heads and bodies.

Jesus said that we should pray in private so as not to be seen as trying to outdo each other in chastity, righteousness and other one-upmanship adjectives that you might think of. Yet most who say they respect Jesus do not follow his teachings of remaining private and insist on public displays of their perceived insult to others not of their brand.

I see the secular world as following Jesus’ advice on this while the so called religious ignore Jesus.

Thoughts?

Regards
DL

User Info: zinformant

zinformant
1 month ago#2
GnosticBishop posted...
Would a ban on all public religious representations and displays ease religious hatreds and violence?

The short answer is no.
Is it naive to dream of a world without war?

User Info: SSj4Wingzero

SSj4Wingzero
1 month ago#3
No. What that does is it sends moderates into the hands of extremists.

Repressive secularism generally blows up in people's faces. In fact, many Middle Eastern countries were forcibly made into secular governments, oftentimes due to US support of secular anti-communist dictators like Saddam Hussein of Iraq, Reza Pahlavi of Iran, and so on. The reality is that extremist ideology has a tendency to weather whatever attempts exist to try to curtail it,

As an example, from the 50's through the 70's, the Shah of Iran instituted a repressive secularist regime. He granted suffrage to women, curtailed the power of the clerics and religious leaders (who up to that point had tremendous power in education, family law, and also owned large amounts of land which was forcibly redistributed), and tried to forcibly modernize Iran. What ended up happening...was a revolution against the Shah led by religious extremists, who still currently rule Iran.
Not changing this sig until the Knicks win the NBA Championship! Started...4/23/2011? Or was it 2010?

User Info: kozlo100

kozlo100
1 month ago#4
SSj4Wingzero posted...
No. What that does is it sends moderates into the hands of extremists.


Obviously, but then again you're saying this in a topic where the TC thinks that the USA is a Christian nation with the highest crime rates in the world, and that nations who suppress religion are peaceful and law abiding.

So....
Time flies like the wind,
and fruit flies like a banana.

User Info: GnosticBishop

GnosticBishop
1 month ago#5
zinformant posted...
GnosticBishop posted...
Would a ban on all public religious representations and displays ease religious hatreds and violence?

The short answer is no.


Why not?
It is working well in France as it helped usher in reform in Islam.
France now has the only mosque that is run by a female imam who embraces unveiled women and gays.
Would you not prefer that to the other type that hate women and gays and refuse them equality?

Regards
DL

User Info: GnosticBishop

GnosticBishop
1 month ago#6
SSj4Wingzero posted...
No. What that does is it sends moderates into the hands of extremists.

Repressive secularism generally blows up in people's faces. In fact, many Middle Eastern countries were forcibly made into secular governments, oftentimes due to US support of secular anti-communist dictators like Saddam Hussein of Iraq, Reza Pahlavi of Iran, and so on. The reality is that extremist ideology has a tendency to weather whatever attempts exist to try to curtail it,

As an example, from the 50's through the 70's, the Shah of Iran instituted a repressive secularist regime. He granted suffrage to women, curtailed the power of the clerics and religious leaders (who up to that point had tremendous power in education, family law, and also owned large amounts of land which was forcibly redistributed), and tried to forcibly modernize Iran. What ended up happening...was a revolution against the Shah led by religious extremists, who still currently rule Iran.


Ancient history is interesting but we live in a whole new world.

Please read the post above and add the fact that other Northern E U nations are following France's methods and are also reaping the rewards of Muslim reform as they are telling Muslims to shape up of ship out.

Regards
DL

User Info: GnosticBishop

GnosticBishop
1 month ago#7
kozlo100 posted...
SSj4Wingzero posted...
No. What that does is it sends moderates into the hands of extremists.


Obviously, but then again you're saying this in a topic where the TC thinks that the USA is a Christian nation with the highest crime rates in the world, and that nations who suppress religion are peaceful and law abiding.

So....


Indeed. All true except to the ill informed or dim minds. I do not think I used the word suppress for the peaceful part though.
I will let you get the quote as I do not have the time.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VdtwTeBPYQA

Regards
DL
(edited 1 month ago)

User Info: kozlo100

kozlo100
1 month ago#8
So on top of all those other misconceptions, you don't think a ban is suppression?
Time flies like the wind,
and fruit flies like a banana.

User Info: SSj4Wingzero

SSj4Wingzero
1 month ago#9
GnosticBishop posted...
Ancient history is interesting but we live in a whole new world.


This is not "ancient history." These were decisions made in the 20th century whose fallout still affects us today. We supported repressive secular regimes in the Middle East during the 20th century and we're dealing with the fallout of it RIGHT NOW still.

The whole notion that prohibiting religious displays will somehow prevent extremist violence is nonsense. If you actually bother to read up on the profiles of the young men who became terrorists and jihadists, you will find that the overwhelming majority of them were not religious. They had no connection to local mosques, no involvement in religious affairs, and certainly no background in religious education. Oftentimes, when these people commit acts of terror, news media tracks down their friends and associates. What's often heard? "I had no idea he was even religious, let alone part of an Islamist terror group."

For example, the ringleader of the Paris attacks was a terrorist named Abdelhamid Abaaoud. A real scumbag, of course. News media would have you think that he was radicalized because of tensions between Islam and Western society, but the thing is, he attended a Catholic school growing up. His parents were not particularly religious. For most of his life, he smoked a ton of weed and partied a hell of a lot. Limiting displays of religion wouldn't have affected him; he spent more time partying at clubs than he did at mosques. He started getting into trouble - petty thefts, assaults, that sort of stuff. All of a sudden, within the span of a year, he becomes radicalized and goes to Syria. I'm trying to look up if he was ever part of a Mosque in Belgium or France, but it doesn't appear to be the case. For the overwhelming majority of his life, this man had barely any connection to religion, and within a year he becomes a terrorist who orchestrates the deaths of hundreds of innocent people.

If you look up the bios of people who join up with terrorist groups, they're all very similar. In fact, many studies have shown that having a strong religious identity and strong ties to a local religious organization actually *prevents* you from being radicalized.
Not changing this sig until the Knicks win the NBA Championship! Started...4/23/2011? Or was it 2010?
(edited 1 month ago)

User Info: 3127

3127
1 month ago#10
GnosticBishop posted...


France now has the only mosque that is run by a female imam who embraces unveiled women and gays.
Would you not prefer that to the other type that hate women and gays and refuse them equality?

Regards
DL


No, I prefer the original.
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