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User Info: MrOldSchool

MrOldSchool
3 years ago#1
In my current job, our department uses Excel for virtually everything. As a result, over the last couple of years I’ve taken it upon myself to learn VBA to make my job, and the work of our department, much easier. I’ve become extremely proficient, and have even developed a few what I would consider full fledged applications that are required to be used daily within our department.

That being the case, through this work I’ve learned that I love programming. I get it, and I’m good at it. But I also understand that there isn’t much of a market for VBA programmers these days. Looking for any suggestions on the next steps to take towards a career in programming? Languages to learn, anything. Or are there any jobs I could look at getting into with just my knowledge of VBA?

Thank you in advance
-ziegfried

User Info: leonzill

leonzill
3 years ago#2
Dunno about jobs you could get strictly from your VBA knowledge, but you could look into coding bootcamps in your area.

Angular, React, Node, Javascript, C#, C/C++, Ruby on Rails, ASP.NET, PHP, MySQL are all pretty in-demand in my area. YMMV since we're probably not in the same city. I'd recommend starting out with HTML, CSS, and Javascript - check out https://www.freecodecamp.org - then move on to Ruby or Python. I can't speak for Python as I haven't looked at it at all, but Ruby is an easy and intuitive language. I don't recommend learning it FIRST however, as it's less syntax-heavy (as in, there's not as much (){}; going on), and may lead to bad habits. I'm still very much a Ruby newbie so take that last comment with a grain of salt.

It really depends on what it is that you're trying to do:
Do you want to make and design static websites? HTML/CSS/JavaScript/PHP/WordPress
Do you want to create and manage servers and databases? MongoDB/SQL/Node/PHP/Python
Do you want to build software and games? This area I'm less familiar with, but I generally see C/C#/C++ as a game coding requirement. Potentially Java.

I'm fairly junior, but that's the general breakdown I see while job-hunting. Again, check out coding bootcamps in your area. Search for programming jobs and take note of what is popular in your area so you know what to focus your studies on. There are lots of free coding tutorials online, so make use of those. Your local community college district likely has free/cheap courses for specific languages or focuses through the continuing education department (or just in the regular curriculum if they don't have CE).

User Info: GeneraILuke

GeneraILuke
2 years ago#3
From an answer I bookmarked on Quora(What are the most popular programming languages and their uses?)...

https://www.quora.com/What-are-the-most-popular-programming-languages-and-their-uses/answer/John-Purcell-4

Java: general purpose; used especially for Android (phones and tablets), websites created by corporations, and sometimes embedded systems (like the chip that runs your washing machine) or desktop software. According to many polls, it's the most popular programming language.

C++: general purpose: rarely used for websites unless they are very high-volume and highly optimised; the language of choice for 3D games; very good at allowing you to efficiently manage memory and good for anything requiring smooth realtime execution. Also used a lot for desktop programs in general, for creating operating systems and anything where you have to interact with hardware at a "low level".

C: C++ was built on C, so there is a lot of overlap between the two. It's extremely fast and is the language of choice for writing operating systems, device drivers and other programming languages, and for programming embedded systems. C++ can be used for these things too, but C lets you squeeze out just a little bit more performance.

Python: general purpose. Slow compared to the first three, but very good for creating websites and dealing with data. You can often put together a Python program more quickly than you can with C, C++ or Java, but it's not used so much for commercial software that's distributed to end users.

Perl: before we had Python, we had Perl. It's still popular, and is great for munging large numbers of text files, producing reports or automating some kinds of system administration. Also good for websites. Probably a bit faster than Python, but harder to read.

Ruby: a bit similar to Python and Perl, sort of. Often used to create websites, but not quite as popular as PHP and Java for that purpose. This is the only language on this list that I've barely used myself, but it has some serious fans out there, so it must be good.

C#: This is a language devised by Microsoft; it's like an improved version of Java and is now available on lots of non-Microsoft systems, but it can't quite fully get rid of the Microsoft association. Very good for creating Windows desktop programs, since Microsoft C# includes a really nice visual designer. Also used to create websites with ASP, I believe. I hope it continues to spread its wings, because it's a great language.

HTML/CSS: this isn't really a programming language, but is used to create web pages. Languages like Python that can be used to create the "back end" of websites -- the bit that interacts with a database -- ultimately work by sending HTML to a browser. HTML provides the structure of a web page, and CSS styles and re-arranges the basic structure.

Javascript: originally this was intended just to add in-browser functionality to web pages. For example it can enable a web page to tell you immediately if you've typed something invalid in a form. Things like gmail are very heavy on Javascript; you can use it to basically write a whole application that runs in a web browser. Now the usage of Javascript is spreading, and people are starting to devise ways of using it as a more general purpose programming language.

PHP: This is used exclusively to add functionality to HTML. Often it's actually mixed with HTML, and allows you to retrieve data and generate HTML in useful ways before it's sent to a user's browser to be displayed. When it comes to connecting a website to a database, PHP is probably the most popular technology in use, especially for home users. Facebook uses it, for instance.
CEO/Indie Game Programmer/Software Engineer at hardaigames.com and csgenerator.com
PSN: GeneralLuke(The I is really a capital i)

User Info: GeneraILuke

GeneraILuke
2 years ago#4
SQL: This is a language that is specifically used to work with databases, creating database tables, retrieving or adding data, performing queries and so on.

Assembly: in a sense this is the most powerful and most general purpose language of all, but you'd have to be nuts to use it for anything other than certain very specific purposes, like helping to write operating systems or device drivers. It translates the binary machine code used by a computer into something a human can read and type easily, but it had better be a very skilled human who understands how CPUs work in detail. Writing things in assembly is very time-consuming, but fun if you're that way inclined.

R: surprisingly, this is actually a very popular programming language. But it's used exclusively for statistical analysis and things that are closely related to it.

Swift and Objective-C don't appear in the answer but are worth mentioning. They are used for apple devices(Macs, Iphones, Ipads etc...).
CEO/Indie Game Programmer/Software Engineer at hardaigames.com and csgenerator.com
PSN: GeneralLuke(The I is really a capital i)
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