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User Info: Oneform

Oneform
5 years ago#1
Hi, I'm new to this and would like to start my long and arduous journey to hopefully becoming a Web developer.

Anyway, I'm aware you can use wordpad for HTML & CSS but are there any better programs?

I'm sure there is but just wondered what people had used and how good/helpful they found it.
The fine line between honour and vengeance will be crossed by one.
You went full bigfoot, you never go full bigfoot. 11/12/15 - The day it all changed.

User Info: gmo7897

gmo7897
5 years ago#2
I wouldn't use WordPad. At all. Ever.

You could use notepad, but even that really sucks for anything more than just a quick touch up.

For beginners, it's hard to go wrong with notepad++. At least it has color highlighting and auto-indent. And, honestly, for just html and css, that might be enough for you - depending on how serious you are.

What type of stuff are you looking to do? Simple pages? Dynamic content like message boards and stuff like that? Blogs? Anything in particular you're considering?
There are some walks you have to take alone.
http://www.gmo7897.com/img/gmo.png

User Info: Agedtop

Agedtop
5 years ago#3
Try Sublime Text. Consider learning a programming language. JavaScript is not a bad choice.

User Info: Oneform

Oneform
5 years ago#4
Yeah I meant Notepad.

I'm not entirely sure what I would like to do. It's something I've wanted to do for a while now and tried ages ago but stopped and then didn't try it for years until now.

I'm looking to get a job in Web development or I.T. of some sort in the not too distant future (or maybe distant future).

I plan to do some evening classes soon to add to my CV.

What other Web development languages would you recommend?

Thanks I'll look at Notepad++.
The fine line between honour and vengeance will be crossed by one.
You went full bigfoot, you never go full bigfoot. 11/12/15 - The day it all changed.

User Info: gmo7897

gmo7897
5 years ago#5
Though not really a Web Development language, I wound suggest at least learning some basic C++ and/or java (some will disagree with me). Php is really popular for Web Development, so it's not something to shrug off. As suggested, Javascript knowledge would be really good to have. If you do more than html and css, you'll want to look into an Integrated Development Environment (IDE) like NetBeans or Eclipse or any of the others out there.

If you live in the US and want to work for the government (including states and local governments), you'll want to learn Visual Basic and ASP.NET. Just about everything in US government is Microsoft-based stuff, so you'd have to get used to that.

Python is another really strong language that a lot of people wound likely recommend. In reality, my suggestion would be to pick one language and learn it really well, and then picking up other languages isn't nearly as difficult. If you try to learn for languages at once, you'll likely confuse yourself with syntax and capabilities. Personally, I started with php and learned it really well and then moved to C++. Looking back, I kind of wish I had gone the other way, but I can't complain right now.
There are some walks you have to take alone.
http://www.gmo7897.com/img/gmo.png

User Info: onoturtle

onoturtle
5 years ago#6
In the places I've worked, Vim looks to be the editor of choice. Unless you're using an MS framework, then you ought to be using Visual Studio.

In the end, use whatever editor and get proficient at it. No one ought to care what programs you use as long as you're productive and it is compatible with whatever stack you're working with.

I think it is far more important to pick a good tech stack and learn and get proficient with that. I guess the old popular stack is LAMP (linux, apache, mysql and php). But I don't think people like PHP these days (I think most of that stuff is just legacy work at this point, but still viable to find a job doing that), so instead of that, look at say Rails or Django. Or a MS stack. Check them out, pick what you enjoy the most, and look for a job that uses the skills you invested in. There's tons of Javascript libraries for the UI side of things, e.g. jQuery, D3.js, bootstrap, react...

I work on backend and research stuff, so I'm not at all familiar with web UI. I personally do a lot of Groovy when I need to deal with Java, Ruby for Rails, SQL for the backend related work. For Groovy/Java I use Eclipse, which I don't really like but I haven't spent the time to find a good alternative. And it's what used in the office so easier ask a question if I have Eclipse issues. Vim for Ruby. I actually have little experience with Vim, but slowly getting better. Vim and Emacs are usually convenient to edit code when you're editing code on a remote machine via terminal. Once you're good at that, you'll probably be like my coworks and just so Vim/Emacs locally too.

User Info: gmo7897

gmo7897
5 years ago#7
Just a head's up about Vim. It's a much different experience than most people (more specifically, most Windows users) are used to. It's a very powerful tool, but it can take some time to get used to. If you're serious about programming, I would recommend it, but just know that it's a different beast from the design tools a lot of people are used to.

IDEs like NetBeans and Eclipse kind of try to replicate more familiar tools like MS Word in look and feel. Many of the shortcuts are the same and stuff like that. Learning to use something like that is more about just getting used to the interface and learning how to navigate the platform/learning what it is capable of.

Like ono said, try a few things out and learn what works best for you. Vim might honestly be your best option. Personally, I use Microsoft Visual Studio 2015/Community (which I believe is still free for an individual user) for most of my work, but it does not have native support for much beyond the MS stack (Visual Basic, ASP.NET) and a couple of other basic, general-purpose languages (C#, C++) and maybe HTML/CSS (can't remember off-hand if that was native or added through a plug-in). Of course, I also work for a government office, so MS is our go-to system. I also use Eclipse pretty regularly, and I have used Vim before - I need to keep working with it though to gain some real familiarity.
There are some walks you have to take alone.
http://www.gmo7897.com/img/gmo.png

User Info: BridgeFour

BridgeFour
5 years ago#8
I really, really like Atom (modular, look and feel), but then I develop on Rails.
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User Info: red_robin

red_robin
5 years ago#9
Look for a good IDE. VIM is powerful, but a pain in the ass to get used to. I like Jetbrains IDEs for everything outside of .NET, and obviously Visual Studio for everything inside of .NET (until Project Rider gets a full release).

As far as languages go, there are a ton of options. Front-end and Back-end development is barely a thing anymore in web development, most places want you to be strong in both (until you get to senior level at least), but you can still specialize and do fine. Javascript is the only option for front end development, and a strong option in back end development now that node.js has exploded. Java is sparse in the web world, you wont often find a back-end web dev job in Java but the language is powerful and reaches far beyond the web; a good choice if you're not sure where you want to head in the programming world.

If you're sure about web development, my opinion is that Javascript is a must for front-end, and for the back-end Node.js is light, scalable and fast and is just Javascript, so you could get by with only learning one language really well (until you get bored and learn something else).. C# and ASP.NET is a fun place to start - it's clean, easy and super structured so you wont fall for a lot of the pitfalls that other languages and frameworks wont protect you from. PHP is the language to learn if you want a job like next week. PHP is the biggest language of the web and it's showing no sign of changing. Learning PHP (with the Laravel framework - it's amazing) could get you a job in web development extremely quickly.

I started with PHP myself, learned Javascript as needed. It got my into the business pretty quickly. For personal projects and clients who don't care what I use, I run with node and occasionally .NET because it's something slightly different, but every job offer I get is a LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP) job.
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