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  3. After Earth is, in my opinion, a movie strongly influenced by Scientology.

User Info: DarkAcolyte755

DarkAcolyte755
7 years ago#1
What is After Earth about?

Here is the plot synopsis from Columbia Pictures:

One thousand years after cataclysmic events forced humanity's escape from Earth, Nova Prime has become mankind's new home. Legendary General Cypher Raige returns from an extended tour of duty to his estranged family, ready to be a father to his 13-year-old son, Kitai. When an asteroid storm damages Cypher and Kitai's craft, they crash-land on a now unfamiliar and dangerous Earth. As his father lies dying in the cockpit, Kitai must trek across the hostile terrain to recover their rescue beacon. His whole life, Kitai has wanted nothing more than to be a soldier like his father. Today, he gets his chance.

After Earth was actually Will Smith's idea from the very start, and he hired M. Night Shyamalan as the director and Gary Whitta as the writer to help realize his vision. The finished script was actually worked on by Shyamalan as well, but the point is that Will came up with the concept and was likely involved in many parts of the production.

But Will Smith isn't a Scientologist.

Yes, he is.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Village_Leadership_Academy

This is the private elementary school that Will and his wife Jada founded in southern California, which their children Jaden and Willow both attended. (So does Suri Cruise.)

Now, here's the kicker: one of L. Ron Hubbard's most clever achievements was the development of something called "Study Tech", which is administered by a Scientology front organization called Applied Scholastics.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Study_Tech

Study Tech teaches that students are only unable to learn because of three barriers: absence of mass, too steep a gradient, and the misunderstood word.

- "Absence of mass" refers to the need for physical examples or models, which is most often found in the use of modeling clay.
- "Too steep a gradient" refers to the repetitive, step-by-step structure of lessons from which you cannot deviate under any circumstance.
- "The misunderstood word" refers to the Dianetics/Scientology belief that the moment you get to an unfamiliar word in a passage, you are to look it up immediately and start the passage all over again.

I cannot stress enough how damning this is to the question of whether or not Will Smith and his family are Scientologists. Why? Because the only schools that use Study Tech are private Scientology schools. Anyone can purchase and use Study Tech, but the only people that bother to use it are Scientologists because it doesn't actually work. Study Tech focuses on LRH as the ultimate authority on learning and, in turn, students slowly get indoctrinated to Scientology.

The Smiths also donated $20,000 to the Hollywood Education and Literacy Program, which is a Scientology home-schooling organization administered by Applied Scholastics.

And that was just part of their $122,500 donation to the Church of Scientology in 2008. And in 2010, Smith donated $1,200,000 to the Academy.

Continued in the next post
The Beard cannot be stopped, and soon all shall know the power of The Bearded One. -J. Harden, 10/31/12

User Info: DarkAcolyte755

DarkAcolyte755
7 years ago#2
part 2

Okay, so he's a Scientologist. What does After Earth have to do with Scientology?

In my opinion, everything.

The promotional material and trailers make it very clear that "survival" is not only a theme in the movie, but also a marketing buzzword. In the book Dianetics, as well as innumerable other works of Scientology literature, LRH emphasizes repeatedly and strongly that "survive" is the highest command of existence and that everything in life is subservient to this command.

In fact, the core of Scientology, the Eight Dynamics, revolve around the concept of survival, as seen in this information and video from the official Scientology website: http://www.scientology.org/what-is-scientology/basic-principles-of-scientology/eight-dynamics.html

The material/trailers also emphasize a few other concepts, such as:

- Abandoned Earth. In the now-infamous Xenu mythos, Earth is obliterated by atomic weapons detonated in active volcanoes, and billions upon billions of people die. The planet is abandoned, but eventually repopulated after the fall of Xenu's Galactic Confederacy at the hands of the Loyal Officers. In After Earth, Earth has been abandoned for a thousand years, and Cypher Raige and his son Kitai (that's Will Smith and his son Jaden) are the first humans to return since it was abandoned. Note that it does not specify when Earth was abandoned, and I have a feeling that might be a plot twist in the movie.

- Emotion control. In the trailer, Cypher says "Fear is not real. It is a product of thoughts you create. Do not misunderstand me. Danger is very real. But fear is a choice. " This is directly in line with the Dianetics belief that negative emotions are from traumatic experiences in our genetic memory, encoded on our cells in the form of "engrams". Exploring and clearing these engrams form the core of Dianetics therapy, called "auditing". In the process of auditing, you learn to control your emotions and take "cause over life", or direct influence over your problems. The infamous E-meter device measures your "tone", which is a numerical value on this scale: http://www.scientologyhandbook.org/FULL.HTM

- Parental influence. LRH very strongly believed that one can exist in another's internal universe, or "valence", and that one of the most commonly experienced valences is that of the father or mother. The trailer makes it abundantly clear that one of Kitai's challenges will be to gain his father's respect, or overcome his father's influence or something related to that, which is directly parallel to the concept of "existing in another;s valence", which is cited by LRH as a common source of unhappiness.

- Space planes. The shape of Cypher's and Kitai's ship, which is remarkably similar to an airplane, is no coincidence. LRH taught that, in the distant past, interstellar travel was accomplished in ships that looked exactly like DC-8 planes.

- An elite spacefaring superhuman paramilitary organization. This is the Ranger Corps in the movie, the Loyal Officers in the Xenu mythos, and the Sea Organization (or "Sea Org") in real life.

Stuff I found in the trailer:
http://i.imgur.com/G9CQymF.png (Will Smith is wearing the uniform of the Ranger Corps, which bears more than a passing resemblance to...
http://i.imgur.com/TDTUJGW.jpg (...the official Sea Org uniform.)

http://i.imgur.com/DBuFo9K.png (Might be a minor detail, but why exactly would a spacecraft need a tail rudder, unless it's also used for aviation purposes? Remember that LRH frequently said DC-8's were used to transport Xenu's prisoners to Earth in his nuclear holocaust. South Park elaborated on this)

continued in part 3
The Beard cannot be stopped, and soon all shall know the power of The Bearded One. -J. Harden, 10/31/12

User Info: DarkAcolyte755

DarkAcolyte755
7 years ago#3
part 3

But to me, the killing blow is that, from what I understand, Kitai's goal in the movie is to reach this landmark on the surface of the Earth to get his ship's beacon:

http://i.imgur.com/Z5LPAGz.png

Do you know what's so damning about this?

http://i.imgur.com/3kdCwSJ.jpg
http://i.imgur.com/1Waq3K6.jpg

The volcano featured in the background throughout scenes on Earth; It's literally the symbol for Dianetics and has been for almost fifty years.

But why would he do this? Why make a "Scientology movie"?

Because LRH himself tried and failed.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Revolt_in_the_Stars

And because Scientologists literally believe that science fiction stories, what they call "space opera", are repressed memories of events that occurred millions of years ago.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_opera_in_Scientology

I'm not entirely certain of the Smith family's intentions, but I'm fairly confident that After Earth is a major motion picture made to exalt Scientology, its mythology, and its creator. Instead of Scientology's recent tactics of negatively attacking others, they are trying to positively bolster themselves.

But I won't become a Scientologist because of a movie.

Maybe not consciously, no. LRH was a greedy man, but he was not a stupid man. He understood that works of art can imprint concepts and sensibilities onto others, even if it's only in a subtle, indirect manner. That is why he attempted to make Revolt in the Stars into a movie, but ultimately failed. The next attempt was Battlefield Earth, and we all know how that went. But with someone as high-voltage as Will Smith, and with much larger financial resources, his dream of a big-budget Scientology movie might finally come true.


I know, right? I'll view the movie and update this accordingly if I find more interesting information. If anyone has any questions about Scientology or wants to discuss what this movie is trying to do after it's released, I'd welcome that. In my opinion, Basically, Scientology isn't some little church, it's the most powerful example in the modern world of a malicious, evil cult.
The Beard cannot be stopped, and soon all shall know the power of The Bearded One. -J. Harden, 10/31/12

User Info: fear_d_hotgun

fear_d_hotgun
7 years ago#4
tl;dr
Ladarius_Green posted...
[Bill Polian] and gil brandt should fight to the death and the winner gets executed

User Info: DarkAcolyte755

DarkAcolyte755
7 years ago#5
fear_d_hotgun posted...
tl;dr


The topic title is the tl;dr. If you want details, I provided them.
The Beard cannot be stopped, and soon all shall know the power of The Bearded One. -J. Harden, 10/31/12

User Info: Liarboy

Liarboy
7 years ago#6
I skimmed this really hard because the question of my mind was "even if it is a movie influenced by Scientology or whatever, so what?" but then I caught this bit at the end:

But I won't become a Scientologist because of a movie.

Maybe not consciously, no. LRH was a greedy man, but he was not a stupid man. He understood that works of art can imprint concepts and sensibilities onto others, even if it's only in a subtle, indirect manner.


Dude. "Maybe not consciously"? That does not mean anything. None of that means anything. Unless the movie manages to present a sufficient amount evidence that shows that Scientology is true, then I will not walk out of the theater believing in Scientology because that is my only condition on believing something. And if the movie does that-- which is farcical to suggest, but I'll consider it a possibility just for the sake of my argument-- then that would mean that it's obviously true and thus it would be harm not to believe it.

That is it. There is no more to it. All this talk of "imprint concepts and sensibilities" in a "subtle, indirect manner" and alluding to a "subconscious belief" doesn't mean anything because I either believe in Scientology or I don't. There's no in-between.

In my opinion, Basically, Scientology isn't some little church, it's the most powerful example in the modern world of a malicious, evil cult.


Oh give me a break. It's no more malicious or "evil" as any other cult (religion) in the world.
An optimist falls of a 60 story building and, as he whizzes past the 35th floor, exclaims, "So far, so good!"

User Info: CreekCo

CreekCo
7 years ago#7
Interesting read, TC.

User Info: melchiahdim

melchiahdim
7 years ago#8
I don't care, I only care if its a good movie or not. Was Battlefield Earth bad because it was made by scientologists? No, it was bad all on its own.
3DS Friend Code: 0516-8714-1928
Vita: Melchiahdim

User Info: CreekCo

CreekCo
7 years ago#9
Liarboy posted...
I skimmed this really hard because the question of my mind was "even if it is a movie influenced by Scientology or whatever, so what?" but then I caught this bit at the end:

But I won't become a Scientologist because of a movie.

Maybe not consciously, no. LRH was a greedy man, but he was not a stupid man. He understood that works of art can imprint concepts and sensibilities onto others, even if it's only in a subtle, indirect manner.


Dude. "Maybe not consciously"? That does not mean anything. None of that means anything. Unless the movie manages to present a sufficient amount evidence that shows that Scientology is true, then I will not walk out of the theater believing in Scientology because that is my only condition on believing something. And if the movie does that-- which is farcical to suggest, but I'll consider it a possibility just for the sake of my argument-- then that would mean that it's obviously true and thus it would be harm not to believe it.

That is it. There is no more to it. All this talk of "imprint concepts and sensibilities" in a "subtle, indirect manner" and alluding to a "subconscious belief" doesn't mean anything because I either believe in Scientology or I don't. There's no in-between.

In my opinion, Basically, Scientology isn't some little church, it's the most powerful example in the modern world of a malicious, evil cult.


Oh give me a break. It's no more malicious or "evil" as any other cult (religion) in the world.


He straight up shows you the volcano; that was on all of the commercials for L.R. Hubbard books all throughout the 80s.

User Info: Liarboy

Liarboy
7 years ago#10
CreekCo posted...
Liarboy posted...
I skimmed this really hard because the question of my mind was "even if it is a movie influenced by Scientology or whatever, so what?" but then I caught this bit at the end:

But I won't become a Scientologist because of a movie.

Maybe not consciously, no. LRH was a greedy man, but he was not a stupid man. He understood that works of art can imprint concepts and sensibilities onto others, even if it's only in a subtle, indirect manner.


Dude. "Maybe not consciously"? That does not mean anything. None of that means anything. Unless the movie manages to present a sufficient amount evidence that shows that Scientology is true, then I will not walk out of the theater believing in Scientology because that is my only condition on believing something. And if the movie does that-- which is farcical to suggest, but I'll consider it a possibility just for the sake of my argument-- then that would mean that it's obviously true and thus it would be harm not to believe it.

That is it. There is no more to it. All this talk of "imprint concepts and sensibilities" in a "subtle, indirect manner" and alluding to a "subconscious belief" doesn't mean anything because I either believe in Scientology or I don't. There's no in-between.

In my opinion, Basically, Scientology isn't some little church, it's the most powerful example in the modern world of a malicious, evil cult.


Oh give me a break. It's no more malicious or "evil" as any other cult (religion) in the world.


He straight up shows you the volcano; that was on all of the commercials for L.R. Hubbard books all throughout the 80s.


OK. I didn't dispute that After Earth is influenced by Scientology; I didn't even really read TC's post because I don't really care if it is or not. Given the fact that Will Smith is a Scientologist and that the movie is based on a story of Will Smith's and the fact that he has a lot of creative input on the movie, it wouldn't surprise me at all. I just don't think it matters at all, and I was disputing the reasons why the TC thinks it does matter. Ultimately, this comes down to the TC's bias against Scientology (see: this topic and it's last sentence). A ton of movies have Christian/Christ symbolism but I don't see him making the ridiculous claim that the movies will all "subconsciously"/magically convert everybody or whatever.
An optimist falls of a 60 story building and, as he whizzes past the 35th floor, exclaims, "So far, so good!"
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