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  3. How long does it take to read chinese?

User Info: Alphadude

Alphadude
1 week ago#1
A MHW Artbook has been released in chinese language. How long does it take to be able to read it?

I am a native German speaker and proficient in English and French.

User Info: TheSocialBunny

TheSocialBunny
1 week ago#2
Do you mean the new 560-page “Dive to Monster Hunter World” that came out I believe a couple of weeks ago (Primarily an artwork, but has a crazy amount of design footnotes)?

While it is true that its easier to learn other languages after learning your first, Chinese is kind of an entirely different animal, and that’s not taking into account simplied versus traditional texts or dialects.

The practical way to go about it assuming an official or fan translation isn’t produced would probably be to find the Japanese version and use the Google Translate app to take pictures of text you are unfamiliar with which then translates it to at least some degree of legible coherence (It’ll mess up grammar and exotic words often, but can at least help parse together a basic idea of what’s being said).

Japanese in general is easier language to learn than Chinese, at least in the context of video games since it uses a set of characters called katakana specifically for borrowed words or fanciful made up names (That and it would be a direct source translation). It is worth nothing that some monster names are outright different in the JP version though like Rathalos being “リオレウス” (Rioreusu).

The above being said, previous artbooks for the Monster Hunter franchise, notably Illustrations Vol. 1 & 2 were translated into English before. Dive to Monster Hunter World is massive, but given the game’s popularity and Capcom’s resources, it isn’t improbable that it’ll eventually have an official English translation. ^_~
(edited 1 week ago)

User Info: Semeki

Semeki
1 week ago#3
1 second
The darkest shadows are cast by the brightest light.

User Info: Alphadude

Alphadude
1 week ago#4
TheSocialBunny posted...
Do you mean the new 560-page “Dive to Monster Hunter World” that came out I believe a couple of weeks ago (Primarily an artwork, but has a crazy amount of design footnotes)?

While it is true that its easier to learn other languages after learning your first, Chinese is kind of an entirely different animal, and that’s not taking into account simplied versus traditional texts or dialects.

The practical way to go about it assuming an official or fan translation isn’t produced would probably be to find the Japanese version and use the Google Translate app to take pictures of text you are unfamiliar with which then translates it to at least some degree of legible coherence (It’ll mess up grammar and exotic words often, but can at least help parse together a basic idea of what’s being said).

Japanese in general is easier language to learn than Chinese, at least in the context of video games since it uses a set of characters called katakana specifically for borrowed words or fanciful made up names (That and it would be a direct source translation). It is worth nothing that some monster names are outright different in the JP version though like Rathalos being “リオレウス” (Rioreusu).

The above being said, previous artbooks for the Monster Hunter franchise, notably Illustrations Vol. 1 & 2 were translated into English before. Dive to Monster Hunter World is massive, but given the game’s popularity and Capcom’s resources, it isn’t improbable that it’ll eventually have an official English translation. ^_~


Thanks for your answer. So the artbook is written in Japanese and not English? If that is true, I won't bother with it since I wanted to learn Chinese in the first place.

User Info: Exodiver

Exodiver
1 week ago#5
As far as I know, the language is called Mandarin... Chinese are the people, not the language.
And as the above poster said, it's not an easy language to learn for europeans, but it's very useful as it's the most spoken language in the world, even more than English.
(I've learned Mandarin in the past, but just a beginner level)
The only verdict is vengeance; a Vendetta, held as a votive,not in vain,for the value and veracity of such shall one day vindicate the vigilant and the virtuous

User Info: BurningLance

BurningLance
1 week ago#6
hmm aint Chinese/Mandarin one of the harderst languages to learn along with some other languages that can be harder or equally hard to learn?

good luck tho
Go beyond the impossible and kick reason to the curb!
-- MHW Characters: Rosemary

User Info: CrimsonStrider

CrimsonStrider
1 week ago#7
@Exodiver

You're correct. Technically the main 2 are Mandarin and Cantonese but generally speaking even people in China use "Chinese" to refer to their language.

@Alphadude

It honestly depends on your own ability and how much time you put into it.

Of Speaking, Reading, Typing and Writing I find reading and typing to be the easiest. With that said, I'm probably better at speaking. I have put very little effort into my studies but live in China and thus I speak and type Chinese on a regular basis.

I put 3 months of hard effort in and saw a lot of returns on it. For me writing is the hardest and it's what turned me off to studying. Specifically when learning two similar characters, I'd be able to recognize the differences but when writing a sentence (specifically writing by hand) I would confuse the two. Like with 我,钱,and 找。It was probably those 3 that made me salty.

But everyone is going to struggle with different things. I personally don't think Chinese is that difficult, other than writing. Ask yourself why you want to learn it though and what you want to be able to do with it. It may expedite the process if you focus less on writing if you don't ever intend to use it (though at least learn and practice how a character is written. That way you can at least copy text if that situation ever pops up).

When it comes to learning I'd recommend on this. What most people get caught up on are the tones. This is highly dependent on the individual though. It's like some people are tone deaf and some have an amazing ear. Likewise it will take time to get used to listening to different dones and being able to use them well. But the more you practice the better you'll get at it.

Likewise there may be some sounds you're not used to pronouncing. Think of your mouth as a group of muscles and you're learning a new exercise. That's essentially what you're doing, teaching your mouth a new movement pattern. It's probably easier to learn it right the first time. It's probably harder to fix something that's already a habit. So with that notion, if speaking is important to you I'd recommend finding a good teacher that specifically understands what I just said. A native speaker might be better in that sense.

Also keep this in mind whether you learn alone or with a tutor. Different sources will mention how to pronounce a specific sound in different ways. These are cues. There is no 1 correct cue. There are some goos general cues to elicit certain sounds and a tutor will understand this. Example "Green" in English. Some people in China can't make the "n" sound. There are a couple of ways to elicit that sound. Specifically one way usually works. But when it doesn't, you have to attack it a different way. Teachers have trouble with this concept as well. Ever see a frustrated teacher repeating a word over and over expecting the other to magically get it? Hard for a beginner to do himself. Thus, a competent tutor is my recommendation if speaking is important. A class may be good in conjunction with a tutor.

Practice listening to tones, practice using the tones, and practice the sounds you specifically have trouble with. If you really focus on those 3 it'll make everything else a lot easier in my opinion. Since I always see people complain about
Tones
Sounds
Characters

You can learn on your own too. It's what I did. But it'll be hard to know if you're speaking well or not. I know when I'm doing a bad job because nobody understands me, heh. But keep everything I said in mind and don't let yourself become frustrated. It's possible to burn yourself out by putting too much effort into a short period as well.

But yeah, just practice. If you're not picking it up quickly, practice more. Almost everyone I've know has found some excuse not to study. Me too. The people that do put forth effort are unsurprisingly able to use it.
(edited 1 week ago)

User Info: tezzilla

tezzilla
1 week ago#8
I'm Chinese, live in hong mig speam fluent chinese but cant read or write chinese hahahahaha

It's a difficult language I can say for sure
"I can understand you wanting to kill yourself, but can't you think of another way to commit suicide?" Duo Maxwell

User Info: noizedemon

noizedemon
1 week ago#9
Semeki posted...
1 second

I need that speed learning class for my Chinese!
https://psnprofiles.com/FacistJockGlitch
https://soundcloud.com/noizedemon

User Info: noizedemon

noizedemon
1 week ago#10
tezzilla posted...
I'm Chinese, live in hong mig speam fluent chinese but cant read or write chinese hahahahaha

It's a difficult language I can say for sure

you live in Hongkong?

I agree, it is a difficult language.
https://psnprofiles.com/FacistJockGlitch
https://soundcloud.com/noizedemon
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