How Rex evolves and changes

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  3. How Rex evolves and changes

User Info: Xenocr0ss

Xenocr0ss
1 month ago#1
In this post I am going to show how Rex evolves through the story, as many people who hate on Rex bring the argument that “he does not change”. (I am not saying it is wrong to dislike his character, this a perfectly fine opinion to have, many people like many different things, what I am saying is that people who only justifies their opinion by saying that he does not change are flat out wrong). However this is not a full character analysis (Although I’d use it as a base if I ever made one), I only use some examples and I am not even fully going into his full character traits.
(Also, please reply only after reading everything if you want to make a constructive response or explaining something I might have gotten wrong)
Now, here is a list of some of Rex's flaws at the beginning of the game which I will use to show how Rex changes.
1. His Pure Heart/Extreme Naivety (both strength and weakness)
2. His “lack of understanding"
3. His over reliance on his friends/his lack of power
4. His will to save everyone and everything (Not really a flaw but it shows how he changes).

And now here is how he grows from them.

1. Rex is very obviously pure hearted. One of the first things we learn about him is that he sends regularly money to his Aunt in Fonsett. He doesn't want to kill his enemies (not even Malos) and he "fights for his friends", for the sake of others. Overall he wants the world to be in peace and happiness. However, even though it is one of his strengths which makes him the ideal human to guide mankind in the "real Elysium", it is also one of his flaws as that makes him extremely naïve. Indeed, for example, he pretty much got killed in chapter 1 because of that, by accepting a very shady job with very shady employers. Even though it might seem to be the only flaw in which there is no change, he actually grows from the negative aspect, his naivety, as he matures.

2. Indeed his naivety is mostly linked to his general "lack of understanding". I'm going to use three examples for this.

First, there is the fact that Rex does not understand the way wars work. Indeed, at first he naively doesn’t want to get involved in the war in any ways, as seen in chapter 1 when he is proposed to salvage for weapons. However, as Vandham teaches him in chapter 3, he learns that whether he likes it or not, he is involved in the war, thus the best option is to accept it and fight his own war, protecting the things and people he cares about, having something to live for.

Second, there is how he did not understand the Aegis's feeling, the fear she carried. As he says, he was walking in her shadow while she walked alone, suffering alone, as she wanted to die. But Brighid reveals to him the Aegis’ true goal and Addam tells him that she is afraid of her power. It’s only then (plus using his “own power”, I’ll explain that later) that he is able to become her true driver.

Third, at the beginning of the story Rex had no idea as to how blades worked, as seen in the cutscene in chapter 2 with the Gormotti who becomes a driver, but by the end, he is the one who figured out the very reason of their existence.
(Keep these examples in mind as I will refer to them shortly after)
So as Rex becomes more and more aware of the world, of people, from his experiences, from his friends, he matures. By chapter 7 the naïve, “stupid” Rex is pretty much gone. And yes the whole “I love you, and all you guys” is not him being naïve, as we know from Klaus’ “test” that deep down, he knows what she meant, it is even brought up by himself in a post battle dialogue with blade Nia.

User Info: Xenocr0ss

Xenocr0ss
1 month ago#2
3. Rex indeed relied too much on his friend as seen in the various battles before chapter 7; however it is best seen in each of the battles at the end of each chapter from one to six.

Chapter 1: Rex survives thanks to the help of Nia and Dromarch, then Pyra herself, and he is able to escape from Jin and Malos thanks to Gramps.

Chapter 2: Rex escapes from Morag and Brighid (from whom he was losing against) thanks to the combined efforts of everyone with the addition of Tora and Poppi.

Chapter 3: Rex only survives thanks to the awakening of Mythra.

Chapter 4: The whole group was struggling against Mikhail and Patroka until Morag joined in. Even then it could have poorly ended if Fan did not stop Patroka.

Chapter 5: If Jin’s core crystal did not tired up the group would have met their fate at the end of chapter 6, Rex also points out how he is just as weak as he's always been.

Chapter 6: Everything built up to this moment. Here he can't even rely on his friends, except for Mythra, as Jin has taken all of them out, and even she is not strong enough and Rex pays the ultimate price with her getting taken away from him.

Symbolism which also shows this: Rex before the events of the game literally relied on Gramps to live, as he is his house. And he also literally relies on the Aegis to live after he was killed by Jin. So even when Gramps "dies" and Rex can't live on him anymore, he now relies on the Aegis. And when he lets Pneuma go at the end, he gets his heart back as he now is able to "rely on himself" (more on that in a bit).

Even though Rex slightly gets better at fighting as he learns how blades work, to the point that in chapter 7 he can at least keep up with Jin (not at super speed mode) for a few minutes, throughout the game Rex mostly is able to keep up in combat thanks to Mythra’s foresight (making everything slower and easier), by only relying on her power. However Jin is too fast for foresight and he still gets owned in chapter 6.

User Info: Xenocr0ss

Xenocr0ss
1 month ago#3
So how does Rex moves on from this "flaw”? Well he does not, not really. Indeed here the problem is that he doesn't use his own "power". So a better way to describe this flaw is "he relies too much on his friends, without using his own potential".
As Vandham said, “true power comes from the heart of its wielder” and “power can take many different forms”. In the game, Rex’s true power is at first glance a pretty vague concept. The only time it is directly mentioned and described is with Addam, as he calls it “the power to accept her”, however this is only in relation to the Aegis.

So I am going to go into a much more analysis mode to explain what I believe his true power is. I am going to do my best to explain it in the clearest way possible. Let’s start off with what we know for now, “the power to accept her”. In other words, taking on the fear she carries, as Addam said. This is what Rex does in his speech to the Aegis at the cliffs of Morytha, while fighting using his newly acquired power through Nia, whom he “freed” as he gave her hope throughout the game. Indeed, he pretty much convinces the Aegis that “he won’t let the world burn a second time”, he gave her hope, which convinced her to not live in fear anymore, which leads to the awakening of Pneuma.
His true power seems to take the form of words. The next person on which he uses his true power while fighting is Jin in chapter 9, in which Rex proves him wrong from what he said back in chapter 7 (“… but words do little”). Indeed, here Rex, like he did to the Aegis, is able to convince Jin and gave him hope for humanity once again. However here he still needed to rely on the Aegis’ power, but it is all good as her power is only secondary, it is not his main tool, indeed as he said “but power might be useful”, useful indeed to convince people like Jin and Malos while battling.
There are even glimpses of his true power before chapter 7, however, because of his other flaws, he wasn’t able to use it yet. Indeed for example, he is only able to give the Aegis hope thanks to him learning how she truly feels. Or in the battle against Jin in chapter 5, he could have convinced him way earlier if he already had the knowledge about blades’ existence, as he used this knowledge to convince Jin in chapter 9. As it was at the moment however, he did not even understand what Jin said there until chapter 6.
Many battles before chapter 7 could have ended differently if it weren’t for his flaws preventing him from using his true power, such as his recklessness and his lack of knowledge, among other things.
He is a “giver a hope”, that is how I would call his true power. As I explained he convinces everyone after chapter 7, gives them hope (Except for Amalthus but Jin is the one who killed him). He even gave hope to Klaus, the most desperate, lonely and broken man, who already gave up twice on mankind. Hope is what the world, what mankind needed in order to change, to move on, and Rex provided that, this “gift of light”.

User Info: Xenocr0ss

Xenocr0ss
1 month ago#4
4. At the end of chapter 10 Rex learns his final lesson, which is that he cannot save everyone. Indeed throughout the game he was able to do so very regularly (although each time he does, he barely succeeds/survives). The only time he fails to do so is in chapter 3 where he is unable to save Vandham.
I found that both his anchor shot and Poppi symbolize effectively how he wants to save everyone. His anchor especially, as I will explain, and as it is the only thing that Rex is truly good at, at the beginning : salvaging, which then links back to his real reason for becoming a salvager : Elysium, in other words his will for mankind to be safe and in peace (so you could say Rex is really good at saving people). Indeed, the first time we witness him wanting to save everyone is in chapter 1, as he uses his anchor to barely save Nia, however if Gramps did not come to the rescue he would have been killed, hinting that he can’t save everyone. Then in chapter 2 he again wants to save Nia, this time from Mor Ardain, but nearly fails because of Morag, but he is still able to defeat her thanks to his anchor and Poppi (by breaking the water tower). There is also in chapter 9 where Rex wants to save everyone in Mor Ardain, and every other Titan in the process, by blowing up the towers in Indol. Here again he needs Poppi and then his anchor, in order to come back on the world tree. And finally in chapter 10 he also wants to save Pneuma, however this time Poppi won’t help and for the first time, there is not enough wire in his hook. He learns that he can’t save everyone, let go of Pneuma, and the world is saved from destruction.
(Not really related but still interesting: in chapter 2, Rex tries to lift up Pyra with his hook, but she is too heavy for him, as he can’t handle the weight of her power yet. But later such as in chapter 9 he is obviously able to do so, showing his evolution.)

So that’s why anyone who believes Rex does not change is simply wrong.

And again, this is not all there is to Rex, it is not a full character analysis, just what I believe are the most significant, and worth explaining, examples which show how he evolved. And even then there is much more worth discussing besides how he changes, such as his other struggles throughout the story, analyzing his past in contrast to other characters etc… His character in general.

User Info: Sentinel07

Sentinel07
1 month ago#5
Honestly, I don't think he was handled all that well at the end of Chapter 10.

Sure, he does eventually come to the conclusion that he has to let Pneuma go, but it's only after his friends goad him in it for a few minutes, and after Pneuma eliminates all other options for him, like destroying the bridge and making Poppi promise to not fly him over.

To me, it didn't feel like he truly came to that conclusion if his own volition. It felt more like it was forced on him.

User Info: Xenocr0ss

Xenocr0ss
1 month ago#6
Sentinel07 posted...
Honestly, I don't think he was handled all that well at the end of Chapter 10.

Sure, he does eventually come to the conclusion that he has to let Pneuma go, but it's only after his friends goad him in it for a few minutes, and after Pneuma eliminates all other options for him, like destroying the bridge and making Poppi promise to not fly him over.

To me, it didn't feel like he truly came to that conclusion if his own volition. It felt more like it was forced on him.


That's fair, it seems it was indeed forced on him. Although I guess the point was that it was his friends who convinced him, as soon as Zeke tells him that this what it means to be an adult, he seems like he is accepting it.

User Info: NocturnalLight

NocturnalLight
1 month ago#7
Wish we got Adam instead.

User Info: HayashiTakara

HayashiTakara
1 month ago#8
Sentinel07 posted...
Honestly, I don't think he was handled all that well at the end of Chapter 10.

Sure, he does eventually come to the conclusion that he has to let Pneuma go, but it's only after his friends goad him in it for a few minutes, and after Pneuma eliminates all other options for him, like destroying the bridge and making Poppi promise to not fly him over.

To me, it didn't feel like he truly came to that conclusion if his own volition. It felt more like it was forced on him.


I'm sure you wouldn't want to let go of someone important to you either. I'm sure people will b**** about it, if he readily go "kay peace! I'm out" at the drop of a hat, as well.

NocturnalLight posted...
Wish we got Adam instead.


and when the DLC comes out, it'll change back to "wish we had Rex"
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User Info: zipzo6

zipzo6
1 month ago#9
As I’ve stated before, I think a lot of your perspective is completely made-up.

I don’t even believe that one of Rex’s observable flaws is that he “relies on his friends”. There is just no evidence to support this other than your presumption of character intent based on your own assumptions.

I also agree with the above poster, who said that the Pneuma sacrifice scene lacked any impact on the player’s perception of Rex. If anything that scene has me openly say “OMG Rex shut up you baby”.

User Info: Sentinel07

Sentinel07
1 month ago#10
Hayas***akara posted...
Sentinel07 posted...
Honestly, I don't think he was handled all that well at the end of Chapter 10.

Sure, he does eventually come to the conclusion that he has to let Pneuma go, but it's only after his friends goad him in it for a few minutes, and after Pneuma eliminates all other options for him, like destroying the bridge and making Poppi promise to not fly him over.

To me, it didn't feel like he truly came to that conclusion if his own volition. It felt more like it was forced on him.


I'm sure you wouldn't want to let go of someone important to you either. I'm sure people will b**** about it, if he readily go "kay peace! I'm out" at the drop of a hat, as well.

NocturnalLight posted...
Wish we got Adam instead.


and when the DLC comes out, it'll change back to "wish we had Rex"

Okay, I would never expect him to drop her at the drop of a hat. I'm just saying it would have been more impactful if his ultimate decision just had less outside influence.

To me, hypothetically speaking, if Pneuma hadn't destroyed the bridge, allowing Rex a path to her, yet he still comes to the conclusion that he has to let her go, that would have made for powerful imagery, for him to reject the easy path and trust her.
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