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  3. Dynasty Warriors 9 is surprisingly faithful to the original novel...

User Info: SiegvonWal

SiegvonWal
1 month ago#1
I've been listening to an audiobook of Romance of the Three Kingdoms... (here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lXT67XDPreE&index=1&list=PLyCSiQ2bdudslTQsgVgYyPV40ejr5tNmk )

...and I'm surprised how much of the side missions are actually taken straight out of the book. The most notable one that comes to mind is when Guan Hai is sieging Kong Rong's territory in the northeast during the Shu story (and maybe the Wei story, I forget) and that actually happened in the novel (where Tao Qian sent a messenger to get Kong Rong's help, but Kong Rong had a problem with some tough bandits led by Guan Hai and Taishi Ci turned up to help and fetch Liu Bei, who, all together, rescued Bei Hai and then helped out Tao Qian).

Admittedly the game does a poor job explaining the importance of many side missions (like, why is there an option to go do X mission off in the boonies when the main action is happening by a big city or river?) and you'd probably never know the importance of helping Kong Rong if you never read the book the game's story is based on.

However, I find it interesting to listen to an audiobook of RotK and then remember parts of the game and see how the dev team wasn't actually just pulling ferns out of their asses when designing the side missions. At least from the ones I remember, I can't say they ALL derive from the book but I know some do and at this rate I wouldn't be surprised if most/all of the side missions come from minor parts of the book because it certainly seems like it.

I recommend playing DW9 while listening to the audiobook since the book is basically a written Dynasty Warriors since there are many superhuman badasses that are described as doing basically what you the player do in a DW game and I think it'll enhance the gameplay experience to have the context for what's going on outside the main story.
Ya iz russki bot

User Info: Skode24

Skode24
1 month ago#2
Yeah I've said a few times it's the most accurate by far we've ever had. Game doesn't explain most of them well at all (so why am I going into the enemies capital to get an old man's letter for his son? Because it's a Guan Yu event inexplicably everyone in Shu gets access to) or why were chasing after some hand maiden only to have to kill some Cao random (it was a Zhao Yun event where he literally gets ones of Cao Caos famous swords) but they're covering the source (about 85% of it).

Id wager the majority of the DW fans are not familiar with the novel itself though so the very praise worthy attention to detail in DW9 is completely lost to players. A massive shame personally as people actually are clueless on matters they have such loud opinions of so I'd shake my head at open whinging like "Why have they added Xun You/Han Dang etc in the game? they're nobodies who never did anything. They should have added Liao Hua instead".

User Info: Gray_Panther

Gray_Panther
1 month ago#3
The novel is a damn good read. I plan to read it again after I finish my LOTR collection.
PSN - Gray_Panther

User Info: Arethai

Arethai
1 month ago#4
I read ROTK again leading up to the release many months ago, and even some lines of dialogue are word for word, it’s really good.
Friend Code: 1521-3102-6439

User Info: Rude Hero

Rude Hero
1 month ago#5
I would like to read the novel but I imagine there are many variations now. Which one do you think would be most relatable for someone whose ROTK knowledge comes from the DW series?
Too hot to handle, too cold to hold.

User Info: SiegvonWal

SiegvonWal
1 month ago#6
Rude Hero posted...
I would like to read the novel but I imagine there are many variations now. Which one do you think would be most relatable for someone whose ROTK knowledge comes from the DW series?

Definitely the version I linked on YouTube, as the storyteller has both a first-language level of understanding of both Chinese and English and tells the story in a way that's more "fun" and "comprehensible" than "academic" or "too literal". I suggest you check it out as it's hard to describe.

Not to mention, listening/reading RotK is basically like reading/listening to Dynasty Warriors since the big characters are regularly described as doing inhumanly badass things (like Dian Wei spinning twin halberds to deflect enemy arrows lol). There's a LOT of events that occur in the book that don't in the games, so I think you'll be more surprised than hearing pretty much everything you know already on a loop.
Ya iz russki bot

User Info: Xiahou Mao

Xiahou Mao
1 month ago#7
Rude Hero posted...
I would like to read the novel but I imagine there are many variations now. Which one do you think would be most relatable for someone whose ROTK knowledge comes from the DW series?


If you want to read a physical copy of the book, the translation by Moss Roberts is your best bet. Unabridged, of course.

If you're okay with reading it on the internet, you can go to http://threekingdoms.com where the novel is translated into English for you. The site is a bit wonky from what I remember, I believe the individual chapters are on cached Google pages, but it all still works. When I need to quickly double-check something from the novel as it was written, that's where I go.
Xiahou Mao, True Hero of the Three Kingdoms!

User Info: SiegvonWal

SiegvonWal
1 month ago#8
Skode24 posted...
Yeah I've said a few times it's the most accurate by far we've ever had. Game doesn't explain most of them well at all (so why am I going into the enemies capital to get an old man's letter for his son? Because it's a Guan Yu event inexplicably everyone in Shu gets access to) or why were chasing after some hand maiden only to have to kill some Cao random (it was a Zhao Yun event where he literally gets ones of Cao Caos famous swords) but they're covering the source (about 85% of it).


On the plus side though, there's events like battling Hua Xiong and Lu Bu (at Hu Lao Gate) which are left for the player to challenge, which I consider a plus because they're not only fun but historically (and this kind of merges history with fiction) Sun Jian was the man who broke through them, so playing as Sun Jian or one of his officers is, in a sense, "historical mode" compared to "book mode" Liu Bei. From what I can tell, many of the side missions are minor to the core story so it doesn't really detract from it to have them be available to everyone (except rescuing baby Liu Shan, I think that's such an iconic Zhao Yun moment that it's almost sacrilege to let anyone else do it lol), especially if it's either "side missions based on book" or "side missions based on filler for a quota".

Id wager the majority of the DW fans are not familiar with the novel itself though so the very praise worthy attention to detail in DW9 is completely lost to players. A massive shame personally as people actually are clueless on matters they have such loud opinions of so I'd shake my head at open whinging like "Why have they added Xun You/Han Dang etc in the game? they're nobodies who never did anything. They should have added Liao Hua instead".
I'd argue this is Koei's fault though, as it's a game's job to tell its story and not require players to have read outside material.

Granted, the Asian fanbase would be far more familiar with RotK so I understand the big events (at least) would be commonly known, but I'm sure even they aren't so familiar with the minor/seldom-spoken events and I think DW9 ought to put a little more into explaining why some of the side quests are occurring. Like, why am I rescuing Kong Rong? I think there may have been a line that said something like "so allies can move on to the final battle" but that's not telling me anything story-wise. Maybe if an NPC said something like "oh jee, we're kinda outnumbered by this Cao Cao guy! Hey, can you deliver a message to Kong Rong? He's got men and he's a cool dude" and then Kong Rong asks you to relieve his city and then once you've done that you get his troops helping you as a reward.
Ya iz russki bot

User Info: Skode24

Skode24
1 month ago#9
Yeah though there's tens of thousands of pages of dialogue to fit in so I imagine it's a nightmare covering it all as well as making it work on a game (where stuff like inner monologues won't work). It's easy to see it can be improved but equally easy to see its best adaption of the story yet.

They need to step up the "independent" story telling though so things at least mean more to appropriate characters. Even chapter 1 has you finding some old hermit in the north... He was a massive influence to Lui Bei story as he was his mentor, anything but some random hermit but the story tells you nothing using Liu Bei to find him and why is everyone else like Sun Jian and Xiahiu Yuan trying to find him? DW10 can take all this and make it even better.

User Info: selfpityingbuff

selfpityingbuff
1 month ago#10
I recommend watching the 2010 Chinese TV series. It's all available on YouTube with decent English subs. IMO it's pretty well done, the writing's mostly good and some of the performances are great. The guy playing Cao Cao is particularly brilliant, to my mind. Possibly my favourite representation of Cao Cao (who I consider to be a particularly interesting character) in any media so far.
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