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  3. What's your favourite and least favourite part of writing?

User Info: Great_Khan

Great_Khan
1 week ago#1
I'm about to close up a review of a game I've been plaything through for over two damn months and it's dawned me that the part I find most fun about reviewing has dramatically changed from the past. I thought it'd be interesting to see what people like about the writing process since I imagine we're all just here for fun and not secretly getting paid for this bollocks.

Favourite: Editing/structuring.

In the past I haven't been interested in editing; I'd run it through Word to pick up typos and post away. My earlier stuff is unreadable train of thought walls.

Eventually I started structuring with segments. I was opposed to sectioning due to how inefficient/unreadable track by track reviews are in music (where I started), and how boring/useless/vague/poorly paced the graphics/story/gameplay/sound template is with games. While I still don't do those breaks, it's still good to have the review organised since games a huge, complex things.

Then I did a review so absurdly long that it broke the Gfaqs editor, so I started working on reducing redundant statements. Finally gfaqs added images which allows for amazing reductions in technical text, and lets jokes be snuck in frequently without needing to prolong paragraphs to sneak them.

So now that's the stuff I'm enjoying most. I pump out a 6000 word first draft monstrosity, vaguely sorted into the primary standout "things" I base segments on, and then I have an amazing time trying to cull 25-50% of it by finding the most word efficient way to phrase statements while maintaining flow, or moving paragraphs around to get the point made in a single spot instead of applying it to two or three "topics", or removing segments altogether since their points can be fed through more important ones organically. It feels so good finding the redundancy and merging these statements into one concise part.

I find this incredibly compelling and fun, more than actually writing the words themselves, it's like a jigsaw puzzle that you're also cleaning the pieces for at the same time. The Min/maxing of words haha.

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Least Favourite: Actually writing the words.

The victim is that first draft. I used to finish a game, put on some music, crack open a few beers and just blast out all my thoughts in an evening. Now because that thought blast is basically gonna be massacred for readability getting the interest to write out all the drab technical details about what the game is and what works and what doesn't drags like hell. Instead of taking a day, it takes weeks as I try to catch my thoughts as I play rather than just remembering at the end and it's boring.

-------------------------------------

So anyway tl;dr: What do you like/dislike most about making the wording about the game machine boxes.
(edited 1 week ago)

User Info: Eevee-Trainer

Eevee-Trainer
1 week ago#2
Favorite: Whenever I feel passionate about the topic, the words practically flow from my mind. If the game leaves big enough an impression on me, I'll be planning out how to write stuff about it (reviews or whatever) in my head, just absentmindedly.

Least Favorite: That passion rarely comes to me. I don't really feel passion for much of anything these days. :/
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(edited 1 week ago)

User Info: bouchart

bouchart
1 week ago#3
I love writing about obscure games that have very little information on them available online. A couple of months back I wrote a review for an obscure shareware game called Threat, and the only information online I could find about it was one longplay video on youtube and a page on Moby Games. It's good when my writing feels like original research and not just one review in a large stack of reviews. That said I do review more popular titles from time to time if I feel strongly about them.

What I don't like is that after writing so many reviews, they tend to sound and feel the same after a while. There's only so many ways you can explain a game's plot or controls or mechanics and make it sound new and fresh.
You can't stop Bouchart.

User Info: Great_Khan

Great_Khan
1 week ago#4
bouchart posted...
I love writing about obscure games that have very little information on them available online. A couple of months back I wrote a review for an obscure shareware game called Threat, and the only information online I could find about it was one longplay video on youtube and a page on Moby Games. It's good when my writing feels like original research and not just one review in a large stack of reviews.


That sounds pretty cool.

User Info: 16-BITTER

16-BITTER
1 week ago#5
My favorite part is actually playing the games I plan on writing about, but I figure that's not what you wanted to hear >_>

I'm definitely with bouchart on the pleasure of being able to say a few words about old or obscure games that don't usually get discussed. I also like when I have the opportunity to put forth a unique perspective on something established. And thanks to the update from a few years back, I enjoy taking screenshots and incorporating them into my text.

Least favorite part is definitely the opening/closing paragraphs, something I've struggled with since writing classes in high school. I can type for days when discussing the rules or describing enemies or framing the difficulty or discussing the things I like or didn't like about the game, but my intros and outros always seem to lack pizzazz imo.

I use a no-nonsense template for 95% of my opening paragraphs as a functional workaround. It's not particularly artful, but it helps me get started faster instead of struggling to get up and running. But my outros almost always sound weak or forced to me, like "well, that's all I have to say about that, you should(n't) play this game!". Might just be in my head, but it's rare that I feel I nailed either aspect and I spend longer on those paragraphs than the meat of the review.
The folks who know about frostiness stay frostiest the most.
I mostly like to write about obscure games. The words flow easier and there's no established review "standard" I feel like I'd be compared to. Were I try to review a game like Chrono Trigger, I feel like I'd just be shouting into the void -- some random guy's irrelevant ramblings.

I struggle immensely with opening and closing paragraphs too.

But the worst thing... noticing spelling mistakes AFTER a submission is accepted.

User Info: Great_Khan

Great_Khan
3 days ago#7
ImperialScrolls posted...
But the worst thing... noticing spelling mistakes AFTER a submission is accepted.


There's always a few that get through for me, it's irritating.

User Info: sull56ivan2010

sull56ivan2010
17 hours ago#8
I've never had an issue with writing an opening paragraph. To a certain extent, even the closing one, though it does take time for me on what to say without repeating.

I think one of the big problems for me that I will find down the road is trying to create enough material for sequels. Depends on the genre.
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