This is a split board - You can return to the Split List for other boards.

You're browsing the GameFAQs Message Boards as a guest. Sign Up for free (or Log In if you already have an account) to be able to post messages, change how messages are displayed, and view media in posts.
  1. Boards
  2. Final Fantasy VII
  3. Is the first Final Fantasy game to play?

User Info: Ojisan

Ojisan
2 months ago#21
4, 5, and 6 are a good place to start IMO. Unless you can't get any of thoes, then I guess 7 is as good a place as any. and don't forget Final Fantasy Tactics for PSX.
#22
(message deleted)

User Info: manmouse

manmouse
2 months ago#23
Peter_19 posted...
Calmlander posted...
Eevee-Trainer posted...
EgoKiller801 posted...
I always love seeing love for this specific game.

Same. I always see a lot of hate but I loved it.


Me too, FFV is always fun to replay.

To me, FF5 is like a huge playground.
It has lots of interesting stuff to find everywhere, and the Jobs are super-fun to mess around with.

I also always loved the 12 Legendary Weapons;
that room with all the sealed weapons that you knew that you would be able to grab one day felt like Christmas presents that were waiting to be opened.

Totally agree about the playground feel. It’s just like, all the good parts of playing a Final Fantasy game are wrapped up in that experience.

Another big thing that doesn’t get mentioned enough is how the pacing is elegant and keeps a great rhythm. Compared to many of its peers, it hardly has anything I would consider a “dragging” segment. Upon replaying FF4 for example, I always dread that I’ll have to play for a while with Edward in my party and there’s nothing I can do to make that fun, or in many RPGs I’ll dread long dungeons that just commit you to a huge timesink without a reward that even feels justified.

But FF5 tends to keep the story moving forward, gives you enough control over your party that you should always feel like you’re able to play like you want, the whole sequence of events itself moves at a great pace starting with the elemental shrines and the towns associated, to the new map screen, to the OTHER new map screen, etc.

The more I play FF5, the more I noticed it’s just “composed” with such a great pacing and progression.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-b18HMqJW5A
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nt1-XWiMveY
(edited 2 months ago)

User Info: Raiu

Raiu
2 months ago#24
FF5 is absolutely my favorite of the three SNES games.

Bravely Default and Bravely Second tried to bring that style of gameplay into the present day, and ... well, YMMV, but I think they primarily succeeded, though neither game is quite as clean as FF5 (by which I mean they're often a little too cutscene-heavy for me).
-Raiutaryuu-

User Info: Eevee-Trainer

Eevee-Trainer
2 months ago#25
Raiu posted...
FF5 is absolutely my favorite of the three SNES games.

Bravely Default and Bravely Second tried to bring that style of gameplay into the present day, and ... well, YMMV, but I think they primarily succeeded, though neither game is quite as clean as FF5 (by which I mean they're often a little too cutscene-heavy for me).

IMO the style of gameplay came in but the games were marred by other flaws. Default has Chapters 5-8 existing in the first place - otherwise it'd be a damn amazing game. Second has cringey writing and it's just so easy to get overleveled without even trying.
See me on Discord! ^.^
Eevee's Mystery Dungeon: https://discord.gg/fexbndS

User Info: Peter_19

Peter_19
2 months ago#26
manmouse posted...
Totally agree about the playground feel. It’s just like, all the good parts of playing a Final Fantasy game are wrapped up in that experience.

Another big thing that doesn’t get mentioned enough is how the pacing is elegant and keeps a great rhythm. Compared to many of its peers, it hardly has anything I would consider a “dragging” segment. Upon replaying FF4 for example, I always dread that I’ll have to play for a while with Edward in my party and there’s nothing I can do to make that fun, or in many RPGs I’ll dread long dungeons that just commit you to a huge timesink without a reward that even feels justified.

But FF5 tends to keep the story moving forward, gives you enough control over your party that you should always feel like you’re able to play like you want, the whole sequence of events itself moves at a great pace starting with the elemental shrines and the towns associated, to the new map screen, to the OTHER new map screen, etc.

The more I play FF5, the more I noticed it’s just “composed” with such a great pacing and progression.

Yeah, FF5 feels a little bit like a huge treasure hunt in that regard - kinda like you have been let loose in a region where you have been promised to find a lot of cool stuff everywhere.

FF5 also feels very "fleshed out" in lots of ways.
Not only does it have the addictive Job System, it also has all of the modes of transportation - chocobos, black chocobos, dragons, ships, airships, and the submarine - and it also introduces Blue Magic.
And it seems like you can find treasure chests almost anywhere you go.
...OR at least, that's what I think.
(edited 2 months ago)

User Info: Deganawidah

Deganawidah
2 months ago#27
I think FF7 can be a good introduction to the series, though I don't know if I can say definitively that is a better introduction than some of the earlier games. FF7 was the first Final Fantasy I ever played but know that I have more knowledge of and experience with this game in particular as well as the series as a whole, I think it can be beneficial to start off with one of the earlier games.

Among the earlier games, my recommendations to start with would be FF1, FF4 (originally titled FF2 in its North America release), or FF6 (originally titled FF3 in NA). I picked these because they all are strong games with good story but the systems for how to manage your party's skills and equipment and fight battles are a little more straightforward. FF7 is a game that allows for a great deal of customization, which is great, but it isn't always the best way to be introduced to a series and you can take better of advantage of it if you've played another FF game already and are familiar with the general concepts and rules in the series. This is the same reason I didn't include FF5 among my recommendations to start. To be clear, I highly recommend playing FF5 as it is a great game, but I wouldn't recommend it if you are looking for a good introductory game to the series, at least in terms of complexity of the system.

All that said, I did start on FF7 and became a big fan of the series, so it certainly isn't a bad choice. I can say, however, that I gained a greater appreciation for the game on replays of it after having played some other installments in the series.
"History is the road map and without it there is no way to navigate the future." - George Wunderlich

User Info: Peter_19

Peter_19
2 months ago#28
Personally I think that FF4 would probably be the most "ideal" FF game to start with;
partly because the gameplay is very simple, and also because it has a very traditional FF setting - castles, knights, white and black wizards, crystals, etc.
It also plays the two most iconic themes in the series very early - "Prelude" is played immediately when you start the game, and "Main Theme" plays right after the pre-title scenario, which helps with establishing the Final Fantasy atmosphere.
Also, pre-title scenarios were very common in the first FF games.
They are kind of like the pre-title sequences in the James Bond movies - short storyline events that happen before the actual title sequence.
...OR at least, that's what I think.
(edited 2 months ago)

User Info: ienzo105

ienzo105
2 months ago#29
Peter_19 posted...
Personally I think that FF4 would probably be the most "ideal" FF game to start with;
partly because the gameplay is very simple, and also because it has a very traditional FF setting - castles, knights, white and black wizards, crystals, etc.
It also plays the two most iconic themes in the series very early - "Prelude" is played immediately when you start the game, and "Main Theme" plays right after the pre-title scenario, which helps with establishing the Final Fantasy atmosphere.
Also, pre-title scenarios were very common in the first FF games.
They are kind of like the pre-title sequences in the James Bond movies - short storyline events that happen before the actual title sequence.

Why was FF7 the first game released on PS1 and they didn't release FF1-6 first? It would confuse newcomers such as myself who doesn't know where to start.
https://i.imgur.com/HbfKsMm.gifv

User Info: Eevee-Trainer

Eevee-Trainer
2 months ago#30
ienzo105 posted...
Why was FF7 the first game released on PS1 and they didn't release FF1-6 first? It would confuse newcomers such as myself who doesn't know where to start.

Usually the implication is that you've somewhat followed the series a little. Devs shouldn't have to rerelease everything in the event of minor mishaps.

Notably, though, several PS1 compilations were released that had FF1-6 on them. Granted, which were available in your region all depends. Some were released in some places, and others elsewhere. FFIII I think somehow managed to not get out of Japan
See me on Discord! ^.^
Eevee's Mystery Dungeon: https://discord.gg/fexbndS
(edited 2 months ago)
  1. Boards
  2. Final Fantasy VII
  3. Is the first Final Fantasy game to play?