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  3. Was The Switch Designed With An Exclusive Japanese Gaming Focus?

User Info: grandabx

grandabx
1 month ago#1
I stumbled upon this video about the Switch recently and after watching it, I feel like Nintendo made most of their decisions based on what they understand about the Japanese market and forgot everyone else (read my quote from Iwata below). When you get the chance (its a little long, not for me, but you know), watch the video and give your thoughts.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wHbkHYneIEk
"in Japan, I can be my own antenna, but abroad that doesn't work". - Satoru Iwata

User Info: Dirak

Dirak
1 month ago#2
Nintendo (and many other japanese companies) never, not even for one second, think or worry about the world outside of japan.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BjrQEsqcvpM
Some music goes with everything.

User Info: grandabx

grandabx
1 month ago#3
Dirak posted...
Nintendo (and many other japanese companies) never, not even for one second, think or worry about the world outside of japan.

But how do you become a mainstay in a market that's heavily dominant in the West? Look at Sony. They released the PS4 in America first because they understand that's a far bigger market share. What's going on with Ninty? Why are they still not understanding what's required for a good online experience? How do you get 3rd parties to take you seriously when you're not holding up your end of the building process?

What happened to being fierce when it comes to making new IP? It's not like they don't have the resources (especially now). You cant just sit on your tail-bone and pump out the same thing and do minimalist things when you have competing platforms around you that are also getting ready to be updated. With the creating of a hybrid system, they've painted themselves into a corner.
"in Japan, I can be my own antenna, but abroad that doesn't work". - Satoru Iwata

User Info: Wesfanboynever

Wesfanboynever
1 month ago#4
grandabx posted...

What happened to being fierce when it comes to making new IP?


We're getting Daemon X Machina in the future. That's a new IP.
What's to say really?

User Info: kvmer

kvmer
1 month ago#5
New IP's would never sell nearly as well as a new Mario, Pokemon or Zelda.

Never got why so many people are so obsessed with new IP's that they didn't understand this. Especially for a Nintendo console. People buy Nintendo for the classics.

Whichever response you'll use to counter this will be invalid, calling it now. Nintendo knows what it's doing, it knows the numbers.

User Info: grandabx

grandabx
1 month ago#6
Wesfanboynever posted...
grandabx posted...

What happened to being fierce when it comes to making new IP?


We're getting Daemon X Machina in the future. That's a new IP.

Looks awesome. Hopefully Nintendo help with advertising it so it can have the best potential to sell. That's a start, but more attention-grabbing exclusives need to heading to Switch. The sooner the better. If that game doesn't sell well, expect more devs to take less risk on Switch. I can see it selling in Japan easily though.
"in Japan, I can be my own antenna, but abroad that doesn't work". - Satoru Iwata

User Info: grandabx

grandabx
1 month ago#7
kvmer posted...
New IP's would never sell nearly as well as a new Mario, Pokemon or Zelda.

Never got why so many people are so obsessed with new IP's that they didn't understand this. Especially for a Nintendo console. People buy Nintendo for the classics.

Whichever response you'll use to counter this will be invalid, calling it now. Nintendo knows what it's doing, it knows the numbers.

What did Zelda and Mario do for the life of the WiiU and even the Wii after the newness of their respective controllers wore off?
"in Japan, I can be my own antenna, but abroad that doesn't work". - Satoru Iwata

User Info: TheCaliNerd

TheCaliNerd
1 month ago#8
grandabx posted...
But how do you become a mainstay in a market that's heavily dominant in the West? Look at Sony. They released the PS4 in America first because they understand that's a far bigger market share. What's going on with Ninty?


Nintendo's market prominence in North America is largely thanks to former Nintendo of America VP and Chairman, Howard Lincoln. Lincoln worked tirelessly to present the Nintendo Entertainment System to an American audience. But your question has implications beyond Nintendo, and involves the greater shift in the Japanese approach to game development for foreign markets.

In the 80s and most of the 90s, Japanese games that were popular in the United States were based on American pop culture, Western mythology, or had American story settings. Capcom, SEGA, Tecmo, Nintendo, and Konami were producing titles such as Tecmo Bowl, Double Dribble, DuckTales, Castle of Illusion, Streets of Rage, Metal Gear, Final Fight, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Castlevania, Contra, Resident Evil, Kid Icarus, Puch Out, Silent Hill etc. All of the aforementioned games were based on milieu and IP familiar to American audiences. In short, Japanese studios had made a concerted effort to produce games that would attract American gamers.

By the late 90s and early 00s, Japanese publishers became comfortable with international releases of titles that were aligned with Japanese tastes. The American market was subjected to a rash of culturally idiosyncratic Japanese games such as Vib Ribbon, Shenmue, Stretch Panic, Katamari Damacy, Taiko Drum Master etc. The trend of Japanese publishers releasing Japan-centric titles continued alongside the time that Western publishers shifted their focus from PC to consoles. Suddenly, American console gamers were exposed to culturally aligned franchises and genres that were largely absent from the console space. Consequently, the cultural divide between Japan and the West became apparent in a way that it never had been in the 80s and 90s.

In summation, Nintendo became a mainstay because when they entered the American market in the 80s, Japan was focused on publishing games that appealed to Americans. Today, Japanese publishers have shifted their focus to international releases of niche titles, resulting in a very different landscape for the gaming market. Traditionally, American branches of Japanese publishers only existed to translate and market Japanese games: this is why Sony seems to be ahead of the curve. Sony Japan allowed Sony Computer Entertainment America sufficient autonomy to publish and develop whatever they thought would help the PlayStation succeed in America, which is why the best known Sony developed games are titles such as inFamous, God of War, Twisted Metal, Wipeout, Killzone, Syphon Filter etc.
Rolling on d20's, and my lightsaber is lit, O.G. like a PlayStation that's 32-bit.

User Info: Bat178

Bat178
1 month ago#9
I miss when Japan were the dominant force in gaming instead of the West...
"Sony's not a Japanese company anymore just America's dog."
http://blog.esuteru.com/archives/9212646.html

User Info: DreTam2000

DreTam2000
1 month ago#10
TheCaliNerd posted...
grandabx posted...
But how do you become a mainstay in a market that's heavily dominant in the West? Look at Sony. They released the PS4 in America first because they understand that's a far bigger market share. What's going on with Ninty?


Nintendo's market prominence in North America is largely thanks to former Nintendo of America VP and Chairman, Howard Lincoln. Lincoln worked tirelessly to present the Nintendo Entertainment System to an American audience. But your question has implications beyond Nintendo, and involves the greater shift in the Japanese approach to game development for foreign markets.

In the 80s and most of the 90s, Japanese games that were popular in the United States were based on American pop culture, Western mythology, or had American story settings. Capcom, SEGA, Tecmo, Nintendo, and Konami were producing titles such as Tecmo Bowl, Double Dribble, DuckTales, Castle of Illusion, Streets of Rage, Metal Gear, Final Fight, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Castlevania, Contra, Resident Evil, Kid Icarus, Puch Out, Silent Hill etc. All of the aforementioned games were based on milieu and IP familiar to American audiences. In short, Japanese studios had made a concerted effort to produce games that would attract American gamers.

By the late 90s and early 00s, Japanese publishers became comfortable with international releases of titles that were aligned with Japanese tastes. The American market was subjected to a rash of culturally idiosyncratic Japanese games such as Vib Ribbon, Shenmue, Stretch Panic, Katamari Damacy, Taiko Drum Master etc. The trend of Japanese publishers releasing Japan-centric titles continued alongside the time that Western publishers shifted their focus from PC to consoles. Suddenly, American console gamers were exposed to culturally aligned franchises and genres that were largely absent from the console space. Consequently, the cultural divide between Japan and the West became apparent in a way that it never had been in the 80s and 90s.

In summation, Nintendo became a mainstay because when they entered the American market in the 80s, Japan was focused on publishing games that appealed to Americans. Today, Japanese publishers have shifted their focus to international releases of niche titles, resulting in a very different landscape for the gaming market. Traditionally, American branches of Japanese publishers only existed to translate and market Japanese games: this is why Sony seems to be ahead of the curve. Sony Japan allowed Sony Computer Entertainment America sufficient autonomy to publish and develop whatever they thought would help the PlayStation succeed in America, which is why the best known Sony developed games are titles such as inFamous, God of War, Twisted Metal, Wipeout, Killzone, Syphon Filter etc.

This is a beautiful breakdown. However, allow me to simplify your deconstruction here.

I have said multiple times in recent years, that the problem with Japanese developers, is their approach to realizing their games. Games used to be filled with Japanese undertones. These days they're filled with Japanese overtones.

Someone once said that the Final Fanasy games were the Japanese artist's take on medieval Europe, while the Mother games were the Japanese artist's take on suburban America.

They have become too self-conscious and self-aware of themselves, especially in light of otaku culture's rise to popularity in the last ten-plus years. This has spoiled their approach. On the other hand, to contrast what another poster has said on this thread that is wrong: Japanese companies absolutely do think about what will make their product marketable outside of Japan. Nintendo just knows how to do both - pander to Japan and reach the west at the same time. They simply respect home more.
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