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  3. Any class tiers for this game?

User Info: UchihaX66

UchihaX66
10 months ago#1
I'm curious what stacks up?

User Info: red255

red255
10 months ago#2
Depends on the factors of things, like whats in the module. How much XP you will be getting and how high the magic is enhanted.

For instance in the basic campaign as I recall nothing casts Dispel magic on you, so something like a cleric is king if you don't mind spending a somewhat significant amount of time buffing after resting.

there are a few types of classes, mainly we split them by their Base attack Progression.

High Base attack Progression is your warrior classes, your fighters, your rangers, your paladins your barbarians. they get 10 or more HD per level and 1 Base attack per level.

Fighters are great for Taking a few levels out of and multiclassing into something else, Champion of torms are basically fighter classes without weapon specialization and since its a prestige class, no XP penalties for dabling in it if you need a few perks.

Rangers are for if you know what enemy types you'll be facing in the module. Paladins ... well they get turn undead. as well as Bless weapon spell which adds 2d6 divine damage vs undead.

Barbarians get 12 HP per level and faster movement speed.

Second type are the low base attack progression, your wizards and your sorcerers, they get a attack point every other level. they sling spells, on the lower difficulties where you turn off damage vs team mates they are pretty good but require resting constantly to replace their used spells.

and the Middle type are the 3/4 Base attack progression, which means if you take 4 levels, you get a base attack point on 2,3,and 4. (3 every 4 levels)

your Bards, your clerics, your druids, your monks.

Which serve a roll of being able to do tricks like spells without completely sacrificing their ability to hurt stuff.

Of these the Cleric is the most broken usually simply because you can take domains and use buffs to be both a competant fighter or competant caster depending on the situation of whats required.
If the next one is called, because of his MO, the underwear bomber, you'll know I'm on to something. Calvin Trillin June 16, 2006.

User Info: red255

red255
10 months ago#3
So lets do this,

Base Classes:
Hit stuff Tier:
Barbarian HP focus two handed weapon ideally.
Fighter Feat Focus (favored class of dwarves great for multiclassing)
Paladin -Holy warrior, Divine Focus, Strong though allignment restricted)
Ranger -Dual Wield/Favored Enemy

Of these I'd say Paladin is the best due to getting Greater magic weapon and Divine Favor. at least in a lower magic world.

Caster Tier.
Sorcerer - Cha Focus, Spell pool instead of memorized spell books.
Wizard -INT focus, bonus feats so it has more skills to spend due to high int, and more perks

Mix tier:
Bard -Mostly a arcane Caster, with some fighting abilities, If you wanted to qualify for Arcane Archer and or RDD, this works. the bardsong gives some minor bonuses to attack and damage.
Cleric - Divine Caster, Heavy armor. Can cast in armor. Takes two domains to add to spell list.
Druid - Divine (nature) caster. Worse healer better damage dealer.
Monk - Really a hit stuff class. Put it here due to the 3/4 Attack progression
Rogue - your skilled class. gets lot of skills per level

Prestige classes:
Arcane archer - Not really a fan of ranged combat, if you want to attack at range, generally use spells. you just don't do enough damage otherwise
Assassin- Like a rogue, except allignment restricted and getting less skills per level. not the biggest fan.
Blackguard- Fallen Paladin, No divine spells. gains a sneak attack. Paladin CHA to saves and Blackguard CHA to saves stack if you want to game your saves.
Champion of Torm - Its basically a fighter without weapon specialization and really good saves. If you take it post level 20 you can get Great Wisdom from the bonus feat list, allowing you to gain alot of WIS in a few levels, useful for qualifying for the larger Druid Shape shifting perks.
Dwarven defender- its a Dwarven Class. Really durable Fighter class. Focusing on HP and damage reduction.
Harper scout - Never saw the use. something of a Role Play Class. I think its a bard.
Pale master - Its for people who wanted to play as an undead. has some good immunities eventually, but not worth the hit to your caster level due to enemy spell resistance
Red dragon disciple - it grants a massive boost to stats, and also fire resistance. Requires bard or sorcerer. So if you take a warrior class, a bard/sorc class and this class thats your 3 classes.
Shadowdancer - For abusing Hide in Plain Sight.
Shifter - For playing with the wildshift forms. Which means it needs Druid, and Shifter as its two classes. people like combining with monk to add their WIS score to AC, but other people like taking Rogue to make an all rounder. Halfling Rogue I think he liked to go with.
Weapon master - Takes ALOT of useless feats, requiring you to spend stats and feats on things you might not actually want to use.

A popular mix was A Dwarven Fighter/weaponmaster 7/Dwarven defender. Not the biggest fan.
If the next one is called, because of his MO, the underwear bomber, you'll know I'm on to something. Calvin Trillin June 16, 2006.

User Info: UchihaX66

UchihaX66
10 months ago#4
Base Classes:
Hit stuff Tier:
Barbarian HP focus two handed weapon ideally.
Fighter Feat Focus (favored class of dwarves great for multiclassing)
Paladin -Holy warrior, Divine Focus, Strong though allignment restricted)
Ranger -Dual Wield/Favored Enemy

Of these I'd say Paladin is the best due to getting Greater magic weapon and Divine Favor. at least in a lower magic world.

Caster Tier.
Sorcerer - Cha Focus, Spell pool instead of memorized spell books.
Wizard -INT focus, bonus feats so it has more skills to spend due to high int, and more perks

Mix tier:
Bard -Mostly a arcane Caster, with some fighting abilities, If you wanted to qualify for Arcane Archer and or RDD, this works. the bardsong gives some minor bonuses to attack and damage.
Cleric - Divine Caster, Heavy armor. Can cast in armor. Takes two domains to add to spell list.
Druid - Divine (nature) caster. Worse healer better damage dealer.
Monk - Really a hit stuff class. Put it here due to the 3/4 Attack progression
Rogue - your skilled class. gets lot of skills per level


Good info-post but I'm somewhat confused. Aren't the divine casters also considered casters since they do much more than just heal? Bards are imo a hybrid melee-caster.

Should monks and rogues be considered hit stuff classes? Both classes prioritize either strength or dexterity instead of caster stats which overshadows the 3/4 attack progression somewhat not to mention monks having the most attacks per round which rogues are probably the best archers in the game cause of heavy sneak damage.

I'm just curious what class is better or worst or that multiclassing is the best or only way to go?

User Info: sibakruom

sibakruom
10 months ago#5
UchihaX66 posted...
I'm just curious what class is better or worst or that multiclassing is the best or only way to go?

As already said, the answer is not a simple one.

In high magic modules (which the official campaign and its two expansions are) the classes' respective power tend to vary with level. The general trend is something like: melee characters best in the early levels, then spellcasters best in the mid to pre-epic levels, then melee characters best in the early epic levels - which is the highest you'll get with the official content. The differences aren't insurmountable though, particularly at the highest levels, so all classes will be viable throughout the game.

If you really want a "best class" for the official content then it's probably Cleric or Druid: these are the classes best suited to switch between melee and spellcasting strategies along the levels. By comparison the Bard's spell selection lacks the necessary firepower to make a realistic offensive spellcaster.

As for multiclassing, that depends on which class we're talking about.
On one hand many classes benefit from stacking as many levels as possible (notably the spellcaster classes, but Monk and Ranger as well depending on the build). Missing a couple levels is not the end of the world - and can in fact be a net positive depending on what you're trying to achieve - but you don't really want to do a half/half split.
On the other hand some classes don't have much to offer past the first couple levels (notably Paladin and Fighter). These are better suited to reach a specific Prestige class and focus on it instead or as a secondary class to complement one of the class in the previous category.

Honestly, it's much easier to propose classes and builds if you already have a general idea of what type of character you'd like to play than it is to recommend a "best class."

User Info: red255

red255
10 months ago#6
UchihaX66 posted...
Good info-post but I'm somewhat confused. Aren't the divine casters also considered casters since they do much more than just heal? Bards are imo a hybrid melee-caster.

Should monks and rogues be considered hit stuff classes? Both classes prioritize either strength or dexterity instead of caster stats which overshadows the 3/4 attack progression somewhat not to mention monks having the most attacks per round which rogues are probably the best archers in the game cause of heavy sneak damage.

I'm just curious what class is better or worst or that multiclassing is the best or only way to go?


I was splitting them by the Base attack growth.

the classes that got 1 base attack every level were in the hit stuff tier,
the ones that get 1 base attack every even level, in the caster tier and the ones with 3/4 progression in the mix tier.

Hit stuff tier get additional main hand attacks at level 6, 11, and 16

Caster stuff get additional main hand attacks at level 11.

Mix tier get additional main hand attacks at 8 and 15

It was just a way to divide the classes based on how easily they can hit stuff.
If the next one is called, because of his MO, the underwear bomber, you'll know I'm on to something. Calvin Trillin June 16, 2006.

User Info: UchihaX66

UchihaX66
9 months ago#7
I'm actually looking for tiers in terms of power or playability. In the 3.x editions the magic classes completely blows the melee classes out the water. Is it also true in the comp games?

User Info: red255

red255
9 months ago#8
if you turn off friendly fire and don't mind resting after every fight sure. was told resting after every fight was cheesy.

and the cleric is god in NWN. it can scrap with the best of them and it can cast whatever it wants thanks to domains.

toss on some heavy armor like enduiku's enchant it with divine vestment to +5, give yourself some stoneskin you got 15 damage reduction and 14 AC.

So the cleric blows everything else out of the water. unless we are doing PvP or something.
If the next one is called, because of his MO, the underwear bomber, you'll know I'm on to something. Calvin Trillin June 16, 2006.
  1. Boards
  2. Neverwinter Nights
  3. Any class tiers for this game?
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