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User Info: thesmark

thesmark
1 month ago#61
wetwillies posted...
I watched Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House. This is a weirdly lethargic comedy, a quality which actually serves it well in the film's opening sequence, where Cary Grant is woken up by his alarm clock and then slowly struggles to make it through his morning routine. The offbeat pacing and tone turns Grant's mundane domestic difficulties amusingly surreal. It’s like the audience has entered into a kind of domestic purgatory. But then the movie basically keeps this weirdly flat tone for the rest of its running time, as Grant and Myrna Loy make a series of bad - and unfunny - decisions about the rundown house they’ve purchased it Connecticut. It’s really a remarkably unfunny movie, considering how ripe the premise is for cartoonish gags and flailing screwball energy. I did like it when Loy tells Grant that he has a “ridiculous hole” in his chin.

I completely agree on it being extremely unfunny and it also truly wastes Myrna Loy which is an unforgivable sin-if you can't get a pulse out her in a movie, that's on you.
My unending quest to review all 554 Best Picture Nominees: https://gamefaqs.gamespot.com/boards/227-movies-at-the-theater/77413506
Duke/Stanford/GSW/A's/Raiders
(edited 1 month ago)

User Info: rockus

rockus
1 month ago#62
The Big Clock and Summer Holiday are up on Watch TCM to stream at the moment.
http://thetramp.filmaf.com/owned
http://ReelFilmTome.com

User Info: wetwillies

wetwillies
4 weeks ago#63
The Emperor Waltz - I think that, just as much as the later Love in the Afternoon, this film is Billy Wilder's attempt at making a movie in the style of his hero Ernst Lubitsch. The European setting, the many silly-sounding fake European names, the humor directed at royalty and the wealthy, and the out-of-place male protagonist bumbling his way through this new social circle all feel like distinctly Lubitsch ideas. The problem is, Bing Crosby is no Maurice Chevalier, and Wilder's direction is at its most stilted. The script has a few good jokes (I liked when the Austrian psychologist tries to psychoanalyze a dog) but Wilder's direction is so leaden that they generally land with a thud, as does the budding romance between Crosby and Joan Fontaine. The film's beautiful on-location color photography should lend itself well to a light romantic comedy, but it becomes subsumed by both Wilder's overbearing cynicism and Crosby's generally unlikable screen presence (admittedly this is only the second starring role of Crosby's that I've seen, and both this and High Society are not good films outside of his performance, so maybe I am unfairly placing the blame on him), and Wilder ultimately seems more interested in filming the dogs than he is in people - fair enough, I completely understand that impulse, but if forced to choose I am more of a cat person, and I found this movie interminably boring.
http://www.last.fm/user/wetwillies
We also would have accepted, "Tell me what you think of me."

User Info: wetwillies

wetwillies
4 weeks ago#64
Summer Holiday - This is quite a strange movie, even by the eclectic standards of the Freed unit. Its opening number suggests that this will be a wistful period piece in the style of Meet Me in St. Louis, but it doesn’t take long before the movie veers off into scenes where Mickey Rooney’s character is spouting communist rhetoric and a group of society women are singing about pickles at a picnic. One possible source of the film’s eccentricity is its attempt to turn Eugene O’Neill’s play Oh, Wilderness! into a musical. It preserves the play’s lighthearted look at family dynamics and small-town life (I assume this to be the case, anyway, having never read the play), which gives the film its earnestness and explains some of the sappier moments, but it also indulges in moments of camp that are closer to the Freed unit style. Of particular note is a hallucinatory scene where an older woman gets Rooney’s high school grad drunk and seduces him in an eerie bar. It's a scene that'd make much more sense if it starred Gene Kelly and Cyd Charisse instead.

Taking the film as a whole, I think I liked it? I definitely found things to admire. The dynamics between the characters aren’t particularly compelling, but the filmmaking often is. The “Stanley Steamer” number and the picnic sequence remind me of Rouben Mamoulian’s earlier masterpiece Love Me Tonight, where he expands upon the traditional ideas of choreography and filmed musical performance by having the numbers take place in multiple locations (often in the real world rather than contained to a set) and grow to include large assemblages of people. The use of cinematic conventions take the place of typical choreography. Similarly, the songs are weaved into and out of the dialogue, in a way that suggests that Mamoulian is deliberately trying to break down the musical genre's typical divided structure. If the non-musical scenes weren't so clunky, it'd be a more impressive film.
http://www.last.fm/user/wetwillies
We also would have accepted, "Tell me what you think of me."

User Info: rockus

rockus
4 weeks ago#65
Key Largo is up on Watch TCM to stream.
http://thetramp.filmaf.com/owned
http://ReelFilmTome.com

User Info: rockus

rockus
3 weeks ago#66
Jinx Money is up on Watch TCM to stream until the 28th (I think).
http://thetramp.filmaf.com/owned
http://ReelFilmTome.com

User Info: thesmark

thesmark
3 weeks ago#67
Re-watched The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (originally watched it for my Best Picture project a couple of years back), and I'm glad I did. I originally gave it a B (which is still a "I liked it a lot"), but I think back then I was stuck on me knowing exactly where everything was going from the very beginning-heck the film spells it out explicitly at the very beginning. This time, I just enjoyed the ride for what it was and got a lot more out of it. Not sure exactly where it places in my top 10 for Best Picture, but it will be all over my ballot as I would expect it would for most others.
My unending quest to review all 554 Best Picture Nominees: https://gamefaqs.gamespot.com/boards/227-movies-at-the-theater/77413506
Duke/Stanford/GSW/A's/Raiders
(edited 3 weeks ago)

User Info: rockus

rockus
3 weeks ago#68
Johnny Belinda and State of the Union are up on Watch TCM to stream for the time being.
http://thetramp.filmaf.com/owned
http://ReelFilmTome.com

User Info: thesmark

thesmark
3 weeks ago#69
rockus posted...
Johnny Belinda and State of the Union are up on Watch TCM to stream for the time being.

Recommend both, especially for their lead actress performances
My unending quest to review all 554 Best Picture Nominees: https://gamefaqs.gamespot.com/boards/227-movies-at-the-theater/77413506
Duke/Stanford/GSW/A's/Raiders

User Info: BigLargeHuge

BigLargeHuge
3 weeks ago#70
I look forward to rewatching Johnny Belinda. I was very pleasantly surprised by it the first time. I’m gonna start taking this 1948 project seriously in November, at which point I’ll probably clog the topic up with my writeups like I did last time.

Fun fact: Johnny Belinda and The Treasure of the Sierra Madre were both shot by the great Ted D. McCord, one of 1948’s secret MVPs. The next year, he would shoot his first of 9 films with Michael Curtiz, forming one of my favorite director/cinematographer partnerships. Then he’d go on to shoot some cool movies like Private Property and some gloriously uncool movies like The Sound of Music.
cabbage
(edited 3 weeks ago)
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