Awesome Works of Christian Art and Architecture

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User Info: zachflash

zachflash
2 months ago#1
Welcome to the resurrected "Awesome Works of Christian Art and Architecture!" topic! May it move you and inspire you! But first, here are a couple things you should know. . .

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Having that taken care . . . enjoy!

***************************************
The Last Supper

https://i.imgtc.com/7GP8e3L.jpg

This mural or wall painting was originally done by Italian Renaissance man Leonardo da Vinci and was painted from around 1495-1498. The painting depicts the last supper Jesus had with His Apostles before His arrest and crucifixion, specifically the scene where Jesus predicts one of them will betray Him as told in Matthew 26:21–28. From left to right according to the positioning of their heads, the figures are: Bartholomew, James son of Alphaeus, Andrew, Judas Iscariot (clutching the purse), Peter (holding a knife), John, Jesus, Thomas, James the Greater, Philip, Matthew, Jude Thaddeus, and Simon the Zealot.

Leonardo's patron Ludovico Sforza, the duke of Milan, commissioned the work for the Dominican monastery Santa Maria delle Grazie (in Milan, Italy) which is where the 180 in. × 350 in. painting is located in a refectory (a dining room used in a monastery). However, due to damage (such as French soldiers throwing rocks or marking out the eyes of the Apostles) and numerous restorations, perhaps very little of Leonardo's original touches remain. In fact, in 1652 a doorway was cut through the painting which explains why the portion that would show Jesus' feet is missing.

Down below, you can see a copy done as an oil painting on canvas that was made around 1520 by one of Leonardo's assistants, Giampietrino. It was used as a major resource for its latest restoration.

https://i.imgtc.com/qqHuZJm.jpg
Sources: wikipedia.org, leonardodavinci.net, britannica.com
Philippians 4:13- "I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me."
http://www.gamefaqs.com/boards/1242-mount-zion (Christian Community Board)
(edited 2 months ago)

User Info: zachflash

zachflash
2 months ago#2
Sistine Madonna

https://i.imgtc.com/vWZ2mQZ.jpg

This oil painting on canvas (104 in. × 77 in.) was painted by Italian Renaissance artist Raphael Sanzio in around 1512-1513 after having been commissioned in 1512 by Pope Julius II to serve as an altarpiece (a work of art set behind the altar) for the church of San Sisto in Piacenza (in northern Italy). The town of Piacenza had recently joined the Papal States. The painting is now located today in Dresden, Germany in the Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister (an art gallery).

"Madonna" comes from the Italian (ma donna) which means "my lady". It is a type of art that represents the Virgin Mary commonly with her child Jesus. In Raphael's work, Mary and the child Jesus appear to have concerned looks. A possible reason for this is that in the place where the painting was originally intended it would have been straight across from a crucifix.

The old man on the left is Saint Sixtus who was a Pope that was martyred in 258 AD under the persecution of Roman Emperor Valerian. The lady on the far right is Saint Barbara who was martyred by her own father sometime around the third century AD.

You may also be quite familiar with the two cherubs at the bottom, which have been marketed in stamps, postcards, and elsewhere. One story has it that Raphael was inspired by seeing two children on the street looking into the window of a baker's shop.
Sources: wikipedia.org, italian-renaissance-art.com, artsandculture.google.com
Philippians 4:13- "I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me."
http://www.gamefaqs.com/boards/1242-mount-zion (Christian Community Board)

User Info: zachflash

zachflash
2 months ago#3
Credit to dark lancer

Our Lady of Guadeloupe is a picture easily recognizable for anyone who has been in Mexico or the southwest US, or is actually Mexican. It's the image that miraculously appeared on the tilma of San Juan Diego along with a pile of roses. The image is full of symbolism that would have meant a great deal to Aztecs. The Lady is clearly pregnant and doing a traditional victory dance over the sun--the deity to which countless people were sacrificed--but is also wearing signs of virginity and is called the source of the milk of virgins.

The image and the conversion of Latin America came at a time when many souls were lost to God through the Protestant Revolt in Europe, but more souls were gained in the Americas than were lost in Europe. Today however enterprising Protestant and non-denominational sects have been trying to appropriate the image for their own use, even though they disregard Mary's role in the salvation of humankind.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Our_Lady_of_Guadalupe


https://i.imgtc.com/k7Gv8sx.jpg
Philippians 4:13- "I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me."
http://www.gamefaqs.com/boards/1242-mount-zion (Christian Community Board)
(edited 2 months ago)

User Info: zachflash

zachflash
2 months ago#4
Penitent Magdalene

https://i.imgtc.com/WqV4wvo.jpg

https://i.imgtc.com/vGMgWzc.jpg

Italian (Florence) Renaissance sculptor Donatello (born as Donato di Niccolò di Betto Bardi) made this wooden sculpture of Mary Magdalene around 1453-1455. It stands at 188 cm (or just over 6 feet) currently in the Museo dell'Opera del Duomo in Florence, Italy. Earliest records indicate it may have been made for the Florence Baptistery ( a structure made to surround the baptismal font that is used for baptism).

Donatello's Penitent Magdalene is unlike some other images of Mary Magdalene in art which portray her as young, healthy and beautiful. In the Bible, Mary Magdalene is only directly identified as the woman who had seven demons cast out (see Luke 8:2) and who was the first person to see the resurrected Christ. But, through tradition and legend she has been known as a former prostitute tied in with other Biblical figures such as the sister of Lazurus and the sinful woman who anointed Jesus. One medieval legend, as told in Jacobus de Varagine's Golden Legend (a collection of saint biographies -known as hagiographies- originally compiled around the year 1260) tells of Mary Magdalene after the events of the Gospels spending 30 years in a wilderness as an act of repentance. She had no need of food for she had the help of angels or "heavenly meats".

However, Donatello's work (which depicts an emaciated and weak figure) may have been inspired by another Mary's story that may have become associated with Mary Magdalene- that being of St. Mary of Egypt who lived from around 344 – 421 AD. She, similarly, repented of her lustful ways and went into the desert as a hermit living only off of what she could find (after having only brought three loaves of bread). When Saint Zosimas saw her, she had been naked and covered in her hair (almost unrecognizable as a human) similar to what you see in Donatello's statue.
Sources: wikipedia.org, artway.eu, donatello.net, caravaggista.com, NEIU.edu
Philippians 4:13- "I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me."
http://www.gamefaqs.com/boards/1242-mount-zion (Christian Community Board)
(edited 2 months ago)

User Info: zachflash

zachflash
2 months ago#5
Pietà

https://i.imgtc.com/Q2zXVz4.jpg

Italian Renaissance artist Michelangelo Buonarroti made this marble sculpture of the Virgin Mary holding the dead body of her son Jesus Christ after the crucifixion (a common artistic subject) in around 1498–1499. It is 68.5 in. × 76.8 in. and is currently in St. Peter's Basilica in Vatican City. It was originally commissioned by French Cardinal Jean de Bilhères (who served in Rome) for his own funeral monument (at the Chapel of Santa Petronilla which was later torn down).

Michelangelo's Pietà (which means "pity" or "compassion" in Italian) is the only work of his to bear his signature. One account says that he had overheard someone saying that someone else had sculpted it which lead him to sign it. He regretted this action and swore never to sign another work. Michaelangelo's work is notable for showing a rather youthful Mary for a mother of a 33-year son (as to show her purity/chastity). Michaelangelo's work also notably shows little signs of Jesus' sufferings with the exception of tiny nail marks and an indication of a wound in the side. Michaelangelo said about this choice that he did not want to represent death but to rather "show the religious vision of abandonment and a serene face of the son of God."

In 1972 on Pentecost Sunday, the Pietà, however, underwent the ragings of a mentally disturbed man through the blows of a hammer. It took 10 months to restore it.
Sources: wikipedia.org, mentalfloss.com, musartboutique.com
Philippians 4:13- "I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me."
http://www.gamefaqs.com/boards/1242-mount-zion (Christian Community Board)
(edited 2 months ago)

User Info: zachflash

zachflash
2 months ago#6
Credit to dark lancer

Here's a huge photo gallery of the restoration of the cathedral of my diocese:

https://st-patrickschoolnorwich.smugmug.com/Cathedral-Restoration/


It took a couple years. They're still restoring some things, like the stained glass window above the organ, the large stained glass window depicting St. Patrick's conversion of the pagans on the right side, and the large stained glass window of the Nativity on the left. Wealthy, anonymous benefactors left a great deal of money to the cathedral parish for the purpose of restoring the art and architecture. For most of my life there was an ugly green carpet instead of the marble you see, and everything was pale white, even the Stations of the Cross.

I remember when all of the scaffolding was in place; it looked like a massive jungle gym. Many pews were inaccessible and ushers sat the elderly and disabled for Mass so that others often had to stand.


A sample:

https://i.imgtc.com/ujLxQrL.jpg

https://i.imgtc.com/pWYRRvj.jpg
Philippians 4:13- "I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me."
http://www.gamefaqs.com/boards/1242-mount-zion (Christian Community Board)
(edited 2 months ago)

User Info: zachflash

zachflash
2 months ago#7
Notre-Dame de Paris

https://i.imgtc.com/7kvsL0N.jpg

https://i.imgtc.com/youlCqa.jpg

Notre-Dame de Paris (French for "Our Lady of Paris") is a Roman Catholic Cathedral located in Paris, France, specifically on an island called Île de la Cité. It is an example of French Gothic architecture (which spanned from 1140 to the 16th century). Notre-Dame de Paris is also known for its large stained-glass windows as well as its creature statues (such as gargoyles which actually served to drain rainwater away from the building). It is also the setting for Victor Hugo's 1831 novel The Hunchback of Notre-Dame which helped spark interest in the cathedral's restoration.

The cathedral's origins come during the reign of King Louis VII of France. Maurice de Sully, who became bishop of Paris in 1160, set out to build a large cathedral built on the ruins of older churches which were predated by a temple to Jupiter. The cornerstone was laid in 1163. It would not be until 1345 that the cathedral would be complete, although the high altar was consecrated in 1182.

Even after its long construction, the cathedral endured vandalism such as in 1548 from Huguenots (a group of French Protestants) who damaged some statues deemed to be idolatrous. In 1793 during the French Revolution, it had been rededicated for the purposes of the Cult of Reason (an atheistic state religion) and then later the Cult of the Supreme Being (deistic). Many statues were beheaded or destroyed. It also had been used as a storage warehouse for food. In 1801, Napoleon Bonaparte signed an agreement which brought it back to the Catholic Church.
Sources: wikipedia.org, insideinside.org, wanderwisdom.com, britannica.com, traveltips.usatoday.com
Philippians 4:13- "I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me."
http://www.gamefaqs.com/boards/1242-mount-zion (Christian Community Board)

User Info: zachflash

zachflash
2 months ago#8
Christ the Redeemer

https://i.imgtc.com/11glj8X.jpg

https://i.imgtc.com/SHGyce7.jpg

Christ the Redeemer (or Cristo Redentor in Portuguese) is a statue of Jesus Christ consisting of reinforced concrete and soapstone made in the Art Deco style (a style that first appeared in France before World War I). Not counting the pedestal, the statue is 98 feet tall with the arms stretching as far as 92 feet. It is located on Mount Corcovado in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

The desire for a Christian monument on that same mountain dates back to the 1850s when Vincentian priest Pedro Maria Boss wanted to build one to honor Princess Isabel (daughter of Brazilian Emperor Pedro II), but it was not approved. With the creation of the Brazilian republic in 1889 (causing a separation of church and state), by the time after the end of World War I Brazilian Catholics wanted a symbol to go against the increasing "godlessness" they perceived in their country.

Through private funding and organization efforts, construction of Christ the Redeemer took place between 1922-1931. Heitor da Silva Costa was chosen as the designer who originally sketched Jesus holding a globe in one hand and a cross in the other. With the help of Carlos Oswald, the design was changed to the arms outstretched as a symbol of peace. Other collaborators (such as for the hands and head) include French sculptor Paul Landowski and Gheorghe Leonida. Restorations have been made in the years since its construction, due to wind, rain, and lightning strikes.
Sources: wikipedia.org, britannica.com, mentalfloss.com
Philippians 4:13- "I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me."
http://www.gamefaqs.com/boards/1242-mount-zion (Christian Community Board)

User Info: zachflash

zachflash
2 months ago#9
The Calling of Saint Matthew

https://i.imgtc.com/gIok0ZA.jpg

This oil on canvas painting (measuring 127 in. × 130 in.) was completed by Italian painter Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio in 1599-1600. Caeavaggio was an influential painter for the Baroque style which began around 1600 and lasted into the early 18th century.

The Calling of Saint Matthew, along with Carvaggio's other two works The Martyrdom of Saint Matthew and The Inspiration of Saint Matthew, was commissioned for the Contarelli Chapel in the church of San Luigi dei Francesi in Rome, Italy where it still remains to this day. Cardinal Matteo Contarelli commissioned with funds in his will (he died in 1585) that a series of paintings based on his namesake (the apostle Matthew) decorate the chapel. Carvaggio's patron Cardinal Francesco Del Monte helped Carvaggio land the job after original chapel artist Cavalier D'Arpino became too busy to do it.

The painting itself depicts the scene from Matthew 9:9 where Jesus Christ calls out to Matthew at the tax collector's booth and says "Follow Me". Interestingly, the setting in this painting is rather contemporary of its time (rather than that of the Bible) such as in how the men at the table are dressed, perhaps to make the scene more relevant to the audience.

At the right, Jesus, alongside Peter, is pointing to Matthew at the table. But which one is Matthew? Many say it's the bearded man with the surprised look pointing to himself (the other Saint Matthew paintings use the same model of the person). However, some people say that the bearded man is actually pointing to the young man with his face down (my own first impression). Some others say it is purposefully made ambigious. What do you see?
Sources: wikipedia.org, mentalfloss.com, learnodo-newtonic.com
Philippians 4:13- "I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me."
http://www.gamefaqs.com/boards/1242-mount-zion (Christian Community Board)

User Info: zachflash

zachflash
2 months ago#10
The Return of the Prodigal Son

https://i.imgtc.com/cbliJBZ.jpg

Dutch artist Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn made this oil on canvas painting (103.1 in. x 80.7 in.) in around 1668 just before dying in 1669. It is currently at the Hermitage Museum in Saint Petersburg, Russia after Catherine the Great (an avid art collector) acquired it in 1766.

Rembrandt is an important, dominant figure in art for the Dutch Golden Age which took place in the 17th century in the Netherlands. Unlike Catholic Europe which encouraged and financially-backed religious works, the largely Calvinistic people of the Netherlands frowned upon decorating churches with religious art especially art that focused on saints, angels, or the Virgin Mary. Rather, art was more focused on everyday living and secular subjects. However, for the paintings that were religious such as Rembrandt's here, they commonly depict a moment in a narrative or tell a moral, religious message.

The Return of the Prodigal Son depicts the moment (told in a parable by Jesus in Luke 15:11-32) where the son who had wasted extravagently (hence the term "prodigal") to the point of starvation his inheritance returns to his father with remorse asking to be hired like one of his servants. In this painting, the father receives him with gentleness and affection, but the other brother standing on the right (who had not acted foolishly like the other) appears to be cold, judgmental. Rembrandt did a series of works on this parable throughout his life.
Sources: wikipedia.org, rembrandtpainting.net, visual-arts-cork.com, dictionary.com, commons.m.wikimedia.org, musings-on-art.org
Philippians 4:13- "I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me."
http://www.gamefaqs.com/boards/1242-mount-zion (Christian Community Board)
(edited 2 months ago)
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